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Old 12-20-2012, 06:11 PM   #271
backdrifter OP
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Thanks for the suggestions.

The cleanliness of the engine isn't quite up to my standards yet, but it will be. I can't say if it will meet your standards or not though. I need to get a small wire brush for my Dremel to reach some of the tight areas. Neither my larger wire brush attachment or my hand brushes can get into the spots I have left. I used an engine degreaser, but it was messy and I got tired of it.

As for the insulation, it has tape on the ID of it and it sticks to the frame. I played around with it, and it won't move. The few zip ties that are there were just to cover my OCD.
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Old 12-21-2012, 04:51 PM   #272
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Sometimes there's so much gunk on these old bikes it's easy to confuse restoration with archaeology. I think you are doing a fabulous job and you seem to be getting excellent advice. You've trained your readers to expect scrupulous attention to detail so when we spot dirt on a part about to be re-installed, we jump all over you. Yours is clearly a concours restoration - mine is just a simple rebuild by a shade tree weekend mechanic. Really enjoying this thread. Let's see who fires up his bike first!
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Old 12-23-2012, 06:36 AM   #273
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Disston and Tin Woodman:

Thanks very much for the words of inspiration and motivation. I do believe that I was 75% likely to go back and do a better job on my own, but if there were any doubt, your posts ensured that I would do a better job. Like so many things, motivation for me waxes and wanes during a project like this, and after cleaning the engine for an hour or so and ending up with what you saw in the previous pictures, I was frustrated, tired, and at the time willing to say "screw it" and walk away.

Last night your posts had resonated with me enough that I was determined to work in the garage until I made it right after putting my daughter to bed. Want to know how serious I was? I didn't even have a single drink when we went to dinner (Mexican) because I knew it would make me tired when I got home!

So I finally hit the garage at 10pm last night and got started. The goal was to do whatever it took to get the engine to where I, and hopefully you too, would be proud of it.

I started cleaning out the starter tray. You can see in the photos before that it was really, really gunky, and I hadn't planned on removing the starter at all, but was forced to in order to remove the timing chain cover. Things happen for a reason, and I'm glad that I didn't cut corners here.

The starter tray after a wire brush:



Starting to go around the engine with a scotch brite pad to get the spots that I had missed or skimped on before:





Starter tray looking better after scotch brite:



Sides looking better too:













Finally happy that it was about as clean as I was going to get it, I went ahead and applied Rub N' Buff. I had thought about doing this after the engine was in the frame, but I'm gald I didn't - there are so many little nooks and crannies that there's no way I could have done as thorough of a job once mounted.





I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this stuff! It goes on so easy, spreads forever, and it really soaks into the aluminum. I understand that a lot of people think it's silly to spend so much time on engine aesthetics, but I don't think it's any different than waxing the paint. It protects the aluminum and prevents oxidation. Awesome stuff.



Yes, there is still some dirt where the starter engages with the flywheel. I ran out of break cleaner and all the other solvents and cleaners I had seemed like stuff that I didn't want near the clutch pack. I'm hoping to remedy that today or tommorow.



And then onto the transmission. I didn't get any pictures of cleaning it with the scotch brite pad, but I went over it again pretty thoroughly, and then moved on to the R'N'B here as well:





Installed all new gearbox cover bolts and washers:



And mounted the gearbox back up:





Side by side. Hopefully the last night these two will spend apart!



It was just after 1AM when I had reached this point and I was tired and cold. But I knew that I could go to sleep with a clear conscience knowing that if you bastages didn't approve of this, then nothing would make you happy!

Thanks again for the motivational nudges!

My father-in-law is coming over this morning to help me put the engine back in the frame. More photos to follow soon.....
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Old 12-23-2012, 09:39 AM   #274
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Got the frame all ready before my father-in-law came over. As disston suggested, I added some duct tape to the padding for additional protection. I also covered some additional areas, and added a few "alignment" strips in silver duct tape so we could see where the engine mounts were located.





Then I got the engine as close to it's destination as I could, but putting it on this "stand":





Then, with a bit of help, in five minutes it was mounted:



I put one small scratch in the back of the swingarm from the bolt on the clutch lever , but otherwise it went very smoothly. I was so happy that I had to wheel the bike out into sunlight for a few photos.









And that's where she currently sits! I promised the wife I would help shop some and then hang out with our daughter while she does more shopping, so no more progess today unless I feel motivated after 10pm again (which I doubt I will). Hopefully more soon though, I'm really getting excited now.

Merry Chrismtas and Happy Holidays, all!
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Old 12-23-2012, 09:54 AM   #275
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I had your share of drinks last night.

Gosh. Don't know about Disston but I'm feeling a little guilty about ruining your evening! And in a cold mid-west garage. Good thing you had all the doors and windows open with all that brake cleaner flying around. You did, didn't you? . . .

And thank you for teaching me a new word. I'm liking it.

Your Humble Bastage
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:39 AM   #276
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Extremely entertaining. I'm about to begin a thorough restoration of an R100GS-Paris Dakar and a lot of what appears on here is very helpful. Now where to buy Rub'n'Buff?
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Old 12-23-2012, 12:47 PM   #277
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Woodman View Post
Gosh. Don't know about Disston but I'm feeling a little guilty about ruining your evening! And in a cold mid-west garage. Good thing you had all the doors and windows open with all that brake cleaner flying around. You did, didn't you? . . .

And thank you for teaching me a new word. I'm liking it.

Your Humble Bastage
Ha, thanks for the nice sentiment, but don't feel too bad for me! Did you see the photo of my beer fridge on page 7? Don't you worry, I rarely restrict myself from drinking!

Now about that brake cleaner - ummm, of course I ventilated the garage!

No wonder my lungs feel funny today....
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Old 12-23-2012, 12:50 PM   #278
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_Rochdale View Post
Extremely entertaining. I'm about to begin a thorough restoration of an R100GS-Paris Dakar and a lot of what appears on here is very helpful. Now where to buy Rub'n'Buff?
I found mine at a local hobby and craft store called Michael's. Barring that, I'd check eBay, or just about any online hobby shop. They have many colors, I went with "silver leaf" and love it. Others have used "pewter" for a more road-worn look and it looks nice too. The package looks like this:



By the way, don't be fooled by the small tube. I bought two and I'm not even half way through the first - and I've covered just about every piece of aluminum on the bike!

Good luck!
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166

backdrifter screwed with this post 12-23-2012 at 01:00 PM
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:44 PM   #279
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Is this too good to be true?

Starting to suspect this thread is really a cover story for a Rub 'n Buff promotion. Gotta buy me some of this wonder product. How did you originally hear about it? Is it commonly used within the airhead community? If it doesn't wash off in the rain, I'm a new convert.
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:57 PM   #280
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I originally read about it here on Advrider, but I can't remember where exactly. I was skeptical too, and maybe I'm not the best person to sing its praises yet since I haven't even ridden my bike yet , but I sure am sold. I tried it because I was inches away from painting or otherwise coating the engine. Although I didn't want to go that route, I also knew I didn't want to fight aluminum oxide on a continual basis. This is the perfect solution for me.

I've had solvents, grease, and all other means of chemicals on the finish, and just like a good wax (that's really all it is - wax with coloring pigments in it), it helps repel everything. Just like wax, I suspect it will indeed wash/erode away over time and need to be reapplied, but not after one or two rainfalls.

A tube is under $5 and will damn near cover your entire bike twice - what do you have to lose?

EDIT - And, no, I am not in any way affiliated with Rub N Buff!
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Old 12-24-2012, 03:30 AM   #281
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Thanks for the info, I've just ordered a tube on eBay. I can't say I've ever heard of the stuff before and it does look too good to be true. Clearly it works a treat though.
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Old 12-24-2012, 07:59 AM   #282
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My comment about cleaning the bike was not intended to indicate any thing was wrong, just noticed some grease in the corners is all. Turns out some of that was shadows I think.

I have never used Rub n Buff. I don't know what it is. I have heard various theories but still don't know. It does look good. I have been amazed at the look it achieves. You say you think it is "wax". Maybe. I would hope so actually. What I have heard is it is paint. That may be not so good but time will tell. It has been around for awhile and I have never seen a report of somebody that put it on 4 or 5 years ago and what their experience was at that point.

I wash my bike once a year. I spray it with WD-40 sometimes. I clean and wax individual parts when I have them off. I would like to have some nicer looking spokes but the wheels don't look to bad if I put a few hours into them.

Your build is impressive. It is a lot of work.
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Old 12-24-2012, 10:23 AM   #283
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No need to explain, disston, as I said, you were 100% right and I appreciatd the input.

Rub N' Buff is advertised as a wax (look at the photo of the package above) and it certainly acts like one in every way. It definitely does not seem like a paint. You apply it, let it sit for a bit, and then buff it out - just like a wax. When you get it all over your hands it can take a bit of scrubbing to get off, but not because it "sticks" like paint would, but rather because it fills in every single nook and cranny in your skin, just like a good wax. It also feels like wax - it has a light paste consistency and spreads for miles and miles.

You can adjust the appearance based on how much you buff it after you apply it. The more you buff, the more shiny and metallic looking it becomes. You could just apply it and leave it alone, and it would result in more of a dull grey finish.

I have yet to hear anyone who has tried it complain, but the biggest complaint I have heard from those who have not tried it is that it seems like a cosmetic waste of time - like make-up for a motor. Again, I would counter by saying that it protects the finish and keeps it clean and free of dirt. Most people don't think waxing the painted areas of the bike once in a while is a waste of time, so I don't know why applying Rub N' Buff to the engine to keep it from oxidizing and looking like crap is any different. You can coat the entire engine in an hour and for my uses, I suspect it will last a whole riding season. It's absolutely a no brainer to me. I'm normally not this anal, but after putting this much work into making a bike look new again, I find that I would like it to look that way for a while.

The other complaint I hear is that it looks unnatural and doesn't look like raw aluminum. Here's a photo I just took - the engine has Rub N' Buff and the valve cover is freshly cleaned raw aluminum that I have not yet applied the Rub N' Buff to. There is a very slight difference in hue, but I sincerely doubt anyone would be able to tell that my engine has Rub N' Buff on it without a piece of perfectly clean raw aluminum next to it.



OK, stepping off of the soapbox now. I fear Tin Woodman is right - this is starting to look like an infomercial for Rub N' Buff, but that's only because I'm so impressed by the stuff!

Merry Christmas guys and gals!
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Old 12-24-2012, 03:48 PM   #284
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Waiting with baited breath.

As a special treat to your loyal viewers, consider whipping one of those freshly waxed valve covers into the oven tomorrow after the turkey is removed (and no one is looking) and crank it up to about 375 for an hour or two - if the finish doesn't discolor or create a disgusting stench, I'm buying stock in the company. Imagine your wife's approval for being so being so thorough. You'll let us know, won't you?

Merry Christmas.
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Old 12-25-2012, 07:27 AM   #285
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I have a very understanding wife, and she has patiently watched me work on engine parts in the kitchen and bake painted parts such as the engine badges in the oven. She's actually really excited about the project since the bike belonged to her grandfather. BUT, we recently found out she's pregnant and I don't think the possibility of filling the house with potentially noxious fumes, especially right before we host a family Christmas breakfast, is the best way to get on her good side.

Sorry, if you want to buy stock in RNB, it will have to be without insider information!

Merry Christmas!
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