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Old 12-24-2012, 02:17 PM   #1
Kokopelli OP
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Rain suits

Either I've been cursed with rain gear or my expectations are just to high. Am I asking to much to actually want to stay dry while wearing these things? Last time I rode in serious rain, I considered stopping so I could cut a hole for the water to get out again.

I've have a BMW rain suit and the bloody thing leaks now I have a Revit and also got wet. However, I just went and tested it, not very scientifically, but still a test. I put a bucket under the crotch area and poured enough water over the offending area until it formed a nice little pond. There was no sign of a leak. I repeated it, where the zipper ends, that's the area that has a large flap behind it, with the same result.

Now last time in the rain, it took a few minutes before I was wet, yet there are no obvious holes. So, what's the likely cause, apart from having peed myself and not noticed? Did I not fold the flaps over the zipper properly? Did it run down my neck? Will the water only push through, if I am sitting on that area?

It's an overall by the way. Maybe a two piece suit would be better? Since I am doing the DB1K I don't want to end up wet at altitude and then end up freezing to death. I hate the cold, by the way.

What do you guys use?
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Old 12-24-2012, 02:52 PM   #2
Pete-NZ
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PVC coat & leggings..
I had a rain suit..drama to get in/out of and
was no dryer..
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Old 12-24-2012, 04:29 PM   #3
DaveStockwell
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Aerostitch all the way! Keeps me dry year 'round here in the rainy pacific northwest. I've also stayed dry through midwest downpours. http://www.aerostich.com/suits

I run a Roadcrafter jacket and Darien pants.

Make sure you get the pants long enough below the knee to cover your boots all the way when sitting on the bike.
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Old 12-24-2012, 04:56 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveStockwell View Post
Aerostitch all the way! Keeps me dry year 'round here in the rainy pacific northwest. I've also stayed dry through midwest downpours. http://www.aerostich.com/suits

I run a Roadcrafter jacket and Darien pants.

Make sure you get the pants long enough below the knee to cover your boots all the way when sitting on the bike.
Thanks Dave, I just need a light rain suit for Adventure riding. Because of where we're riding, temperatures can got from plus 35 degrees (95F) to snow sleet within the same day. An Aerostitch suit would be too bulky and probably not ventilated enough. I'll be wearing my BMW Rally 1 suit and will be packing a few thermal layers, with the rain suit somewhere handy. Hopefully it won't be needed at all.

I wear a BMW coverall suit for commuting, but I don't want to ruin it on an adventure ride, because there is a faint possibility that I might fall off........several times.
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Old 12-24-2012, 11:55 PM   #5
cooneyr
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May I offer an alternative perspective. Rain suits have two functions , the first being to keep the wind out and the second to slow down rain. The is for little old NZ i.e. this is for NZ context, I know from first hand experience that things in Sweden about the Arctic circle in the middle of winder are a little different. There wind protection is everything as the "rain" is white and dry.

Anyway back to story, the wind function is the most important. This is because this is the bit that makes you really cold. Even if you are saturated through, with thermals, wind protection and mild exertion to keep you warm you can be comfortable. The more extreme the temperature the more important the wind protection and thermal layer become. I did the 'Long Way Around Taupo' ride mid year and the -6 degrees C temps (no rain) were pretty good test of gear. Far more than the +10 and raining.

I'm not convinced there is any such thing as light weight waterproofs. I've done a fair bit of alpine climbing and tramping (along with riding bikes) and concluded that you will get wet eventually, no matter what you wear. PVC you get wet from the inside out, same for Goretex (though less so) and nylon etc from the outside in. Basically we all sweat so even the most waterproof thing out there just traps the sweat. I know Goretex is suppose to overcome this but given it relies on heat and moisture pressure to work you still get damp.

The hardest thing to deal with is rain or snow at about 0 to +4 degrees. Unfortunately this is exactly what we had (snow and +4ish) last year. Colder than this and the snow tends to be "dry" (like -30 in Sweden) so you can basically wear canvas, warmer than this and you can generally handle the temp (though +4 to +10 can be uncomfortable).

I've ridden a KTM 950 Adventure for 5 hours from Ranfurly to Chch in the pouring rain with a Revit overjacket, normal riding jacket and couple of layers of thermals. Legs were over nylon trou, MX pants, MX knee guards, and polypro. I wear old alpine climbing mits over my gloves though the rain off mits are probably the best go for riding a bike. Got home to Chch dripping wet on the outside, and had damp legs, crotch and where my back pack staps went over my shoulders. I was a little chilly but pretty good.

In short, thermals and wind protection are the key and add in as much water protection as you can but don't stress about it.

HTH
Cheers R

P.S. the other thing about the Dusty is that you are only ever at altitude for about an hour and very often in the SI once you drop down things improve. If its rubbish at 1600m get down to 600-800m and it will often be tolerable. This is true for the DB route as well (snow was only about the tops and was just an overcast day at lower levels last year).
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Old 12-25-2012, 12:14 AM   #6
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Thanks for putting that in perspective, Ryan. I suppose another thing in my favour will be be the slower speeds I'll be travelling on gravel. At 120km/h on the road, rains tends to get in, no matter what. I am not stressing about it, but I am over wet and cold, I've done that too many times and I am also familiar with -20 degrees (don't touch metal with bare hands).

You'll never find me at a Brass Monkey or Cold Kiwi or at the Elephantentreffen for that matter. I don't even like my beer too cold.
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Old 12-25-2012, 12:54 AM   #7
1Waipukbiker
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Re weather protection, I rode on the "long way round" ride back in June around Lake taupo, It was about -5 when we left Taupo and along with a few others I had a lightweight, windproof tramping Jacket over the top of my normal jacket and it made a huge differance because it took all the initial load off the jacket and allowed it to do its job much more effectively.
With elastic cuffs and a high neck which went up over the bottom of the balaclava and could be velcroed snug around the neck OVER the bottom of the balaclava.
Ive ridden snowmobiles in Antarctica so have a fair idea of what works and what dousnt, A good set of thermals to trap the body heat against the skin is the first priority and whatever it takes to keep the wind out.
As to rain, the lightweight tramping jackets are showerproof at best but again, they will still take a lot of the water load away from the jacket. Lightweight overtrou over your normal pants will do the same thing.
Ive met a few riders now that wear lightweight gear over the top of the Armoured stuff and they all swear by it.

Hope this has helped

Cheers
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Old 12-25-2012, 08:51 PM   #8
Steve in NZ
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Aerostitch has been tested in NZ by 2 Americans I know.

West Coast of the Sth Island.

fail

yip they got wet

they did not even go into the high country where they get 16 metres rainfall a year
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:13 PM   #9
Aj Mick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete-NZ View Post
PVC coat & leggings..
I had a rain suit..drama to get in/out of and
was no dryer..
I endorse PVC.

Those ugly yellow industrial weight leggings are cheap'n'cheerful, but they are easy to pull on when needed, and work well for a year or two. When they eventually do leak at the crutch they don't cost an arm and a leg to replace.

I am not keen on the PVC coat though. I have found nylon over a leather jacket keeps most rain at bay. Wearing a woollen base layer takes care of any seepage while retaining warmth and comfort.

Living in Thailand for now..... I'm a Kiwi who has also ridden in UK & Europe.
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Old 12-30-2012, 05:36 PM   #10
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I have never had my nylon 2-piece rain suit leak on me. A very cheap set from a sporting goods store, I wear it over my regular riding gear and it works well enough in the Florida summer showers. I averaged commuting in the rain 3.5 days a week this past summer.

Maybe I'm just lucky so far?

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Old 01-01-2013, 03:58 AM   #11
driftinglobo
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Hi Guys,

I never had the pleasure to own a real motorcycle rain gear. For a while now I m using a blue colour 2 piece gear, made out of nylon and pvc mix, fully seam sealed. And it is from the Warehouse. I wear it over my riding gear when needed. The last one i bought (1 or 2 years ago) was under 30$ for a legging.They not always available so have to hunt for it, but keeps the rain and wind out. Proven in many rides some in all day rain. It has condensation in the inside after some wearing time, but I just turn it inside out to dry our after wearing it. They last for a year or two, but cheep to replace when it is worn out or lost, and packs into a small space.
Just an other option.
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Old 01-02-2013, 08:05 PM   #12
kiwipeet
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I agree with most of the comments above. Being wet is one thing, being dry is another.

Someone mentioned you get wet from the inside wearing nylon/PVC. Absolutely true. But are you more worried about wet or warm?

I have lightweight leggings, and a thin nylon rain suits that I put over my riding gear. Mainly to do the bulk of the work keeping the water out and also to stop the wind chill. But yeah, ride in the wet long enough and it finds it's way into my gloves and boots and through zips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kokopelli View Post
Since I am doing the DB1K I don't want to end up wet at altitude and then end up freezing to death. I hate the cold, by the way.
The other thing to think about is that all this gear is trying to trap your body heat and stop the wind chill from sapping it away. You might want to consider something that actively heats you instead. If you are seriously concerned about being cold, have you considered heated grips and/or a heated vest?

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Old 01-04-2013, 08:24 PM   #13
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I have two heated vests, for winter commuting, I am very happy with those.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:34 PM   #14
Steve in NZ
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Originally Posted by Kokopelli View Post
I have two heated vests, for winter commuting, I am very happy with those.
what r ya soft
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:48 PM   #15
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what r ya soft
If I was soft, I'd have heated grips :-) But I guess, the only believable answer is "YES, I am"
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