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Old 12-27-2012, 09:26 PM   #16
Chat Lunatique
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larryboy View Post
Except that it's not. Safety Seal plugs are self vulcanizing, Walmart rope plugs from China are not.

Self vulcanizing?

Any vulcanizing I have done in years past involved patching a tire from the inside and lighting a compound on the patch with a match. When the compound had melted to the inside of the tire you blew out he flame. This made a bullet proof seal! Vucanizing involves the application of heat. How does a plug self vulcanize?
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:56 PM   #17
Multiplicity
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Originally Posted by billdonna View Post
Self vulcanizing?

Any vulcanizing I have done in years past involved patching a tire from the inside and lighting a compound on the patch with a match. When the compound had melted to the inside of the tire you blew out he flame. This made a bullet proof seal! Vucanizing involves the application of heat. How does a plug self vulcanize?

With the special glue/goop they use on the rope and tire heat from running it.
The rope type plugs will vulcanize with the tire fairly easy.
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:14 PM   #18
morerpmfred
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I have had good luck with both rubber plugs that where vulcanized and the rope style plugs. Fixed a pinhole leak on a sidewall ( no repair shops would touch) with rubber plug. Pay attention to instructions to get a good bond. Trimm of excess on either style and lite repair on fire then blow out to get a good seal. Stay away from wally world tire repair crap.
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:14 PM   #19
WeazyBuddha
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a belated vote for the sticky strings. Have a stop and go and tried it once but the plug let go after 15 or so miles. I don't trust it. My friend had some sticky strings that worked great and got me all the way to san antone for a new tire.
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:36 PM   #20
Multiplicity
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Originally Posted by WeazyBuddha View Post
a belated vote for the sticky strings. Have a stop and go and tried it once but the plug let go after 15 or so miles. I don't trust it. My friend had some sticky strings that worked great and got me all the way to san antone for a new tire.

As long as the tire only requires 1 rope, I run it until the tire needs replacement from wear. I've been doing this for years
and have never had a problem
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Old 12-27-2012, 10:38 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by morerpmfred View Post
I have had good luck with both rubber plugs that where vulcanized and the rope style plugs. Fixed a pinhole leak on a sidewall ( no repair shops would touch) with rubber plug. Pay attention to instructions to get a good bond. Trimm of excess on either style and lite repair on fire then blow out to get a good seal. Stay away from wally world tire repair crap.
Been using them for the last five years and have never had a problem. I always buy the red ropes. They're similar to the Safe T Seal brand.
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Old 12-28-2012, 06:44 AM   #22
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I will gladly part with my compact and full size stop and go plug kits if someone wants them, I have had poor results from them both, though I suspect they may work fine on car tires. What is especially annoying about them is that you can have a perfectly sealed repair let go at speed on the road, which has happened to me more often than not. OTOH, the flats fixed with goopy rope repairs usually last the life of the tire.
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Old 12-28-2012, 07:33 AM   #23
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I am a big fan of the mushroom Stop n Go plugs, as well as the patch/plug they make. I have run plugged tires to their end several times and never had an issue. Get the smaller tooled version... no need for the big gun looking version. Both are super easy to use.

On the road I plug.
If I am at home I go ahead and break it down and use the patch/plug.

I carried the ropes when riding off road as a backup, when I rode off road. Now the 650 is gone and I stick mainly to the highways. Helga is a big girl to be leaving the pavement.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:03 PM   #24
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^^^ you should consider buying some lottery tickets.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:41 PM   #25
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Love the ease of use of Stop n Go, but last time I would lose a couple psi a week. Acceptable, IMO.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:46 PM   #26
Multiplicity
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The Stop N Go rubber plugs don't vulcanize with the tire. It start as a plug and remains a plug.
I know of people that have had the plug come out shortly after repairing it. The ropes are low tech and
simple. You can use more than one, if necessary. Can't do that with the rubber plug system.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:50 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by eric2 View Post
I will gladly part with my compact and full size stop and go plug kits if someone wants them, I have had poor results from them both....
Heck. I'll take them off your hands if you can't find them another home. I have some buds that might want a kit.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:54 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Multiplicity View Post
The Stop N Go rubber plugs don't vulcanize with the tire.
Nor do any other plugs. They just don't get hot enough unless they are heated like in the olden days. Previous poster mentioned this also.
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:57 PM   #29
Multiplicity
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Originally Posted by erkmania View Post
Nor do any other plugs. They just don't get hot enough unless they are heated like in the olden days. Previous poster mentioned this also.
It's a chemical vulcanization, not heat. It's in the goop on the ropes.
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Old 12-29-2012, 05:08 PM   #30
Farmer Palmer
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Used my Stop and Go today for the first time on my farm quadbike(Honda TRX420 Rancher)

Had a 4" nail stuck in the rear tyre and all i did was load the plugger as per instructions, pulled the nail out quickly, stuck the plugger in the hole and wound the allen key then pulled the plugger off the plug and pulled the plug a bit with pliers i dont think i even lost a psi in the process.

Only mistake was pulling the plug too much when i trimmed it so it pinged back in the tyre........DOH!

Stuck another plug in the tyre and didn't pull it when i trimmed it and it seems to have worked fine..........There's only 5psi in the quadbike tyre but it's holding pressure so far after a couple of days use.

I carry a 'de boxed' compressor aswell but i'm making a wee cover for the drive incase i trim my fingernails with it!

Haven't used the strings so i can't comment but i'm no stranger to repairing tyres on my tractors and other farm machinery.

My only concern so far is that there isn't sufficient pressure in a quadbike tyre(5psi) compared to a motorbike tyre(38-42psi) to hold the mushroom head against the wall of the tyre but time will tell..........I can always take the tyre off and patch the hole.

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