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Old 01-01-2013, 08:47 PM   #16
MrBob
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Originally Posted by PunkinHead View Post



Very nice idea.
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Old 01-02-2013, 12:22 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Canuman View Post

For this job, a good compound miter saw with a good, sharp finish blade is worth its weight in gold. Attempting the job with a hand-held circular saw will have you tearing your hair out and wasting valuable material.
I do a lot of treads. gotta disagree with that, there is a lot of room for error across an 11 1/8" tread. Even with new skirts, there will be lot of variation as it follows the contours of the wall, even in the width of a tread. For putty-less (there should not be putty between the tread and the riser- it happens but it's sloppy) treads, a good jigsaw is the ticket.

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Yes to using construction adhesive and screws on the treads. This is your best chance to not have a squeaky stairway.
I've always installed the skirt board first. It's a lot easier and if you ever need to replace a tread you'll be glad you have that setup.
For the tightest joints between tread and skirt board you can use a sliding bevel square. Lay one edge against the riser and the other against the skirtboard. If that angle isn't square you'll grab the true angle.
Using a tape measure to measure the distance between skirt boards is iffy. I have an old-style wood, folding ruler with an inlaid brass sliding ruler. This will give you very accurate inside measurements and the tool isn't expensive.
I am going to pick up one of those rulers, I've long wondered, never saw one witht he slide. I have one of those stair wizards, it's been sitting on my shelf for about 15 years because it has waay too much room for error. I use 2 sticks and a needle nose vise grips for inside measurements. you can use your fingers if you're too cheap for vice grips. Like you said, find the square(ist) side and work off it, front and back, it can't go wrong, (except for countour). Cut the line using a good jigsaw. Then go back and angle cut that just below the suface for the bulk of the tread, only straightening up for the nosing where it can be seen. The angle has several benefits, Im too tired to write now.
For circullar stairs or skirts with dips and dives or both ends not square, I made a measuring jig using Harbor Freight contour guages as a base.
Since I needed 3 of them to span the treads I was doing, I sandwiched their plastic red bits between my own boards for an 18" width. I glued a few rare eatrth magnets into routed holes in my boards so it sticks to a steel framing square. Now I can put the square against the back riser and easily scribe both ends should everything be whacked.
Theres a few other tricks, shimming the riser out to prevent dips and dives along the back of the tread. staining and coating the treads before install leaving just the final. I have a pic of a staircase in the Things I Made thread.

Oh yea, have you measured all your rises? Codes usually say no more than 3/16" difference over the entire flight. Often, there are problems at the top and bottom tread in this regard. Plan ahead.

Tweaker screwed with this post 01-02-2013 at 12:30 AM
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:46 AM   #18
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better to screw and put in wood plug, as putty will not darken with age the same as wood. If you putty is should be a little darker than the wood.


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Old 01-02-2013, 07:17 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
better to screw and put in wood plug, as putty will not darken with age the same as wood. If you putty is should be a little darker than the wood.
Depends on the wood. Cherry will darken a lot. Walnut will get slightly lighter with age. I'd try to avoid putty with those. Oak and ash don't really change over time.
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Old 01-02-2013, 08:54 AM   #20
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a good jigsaw is the ticket.



Cut the line using a good jigsaw. Then go back and angle cut that just below the suface for the bulk of the tread, only straightening up for the nosing where it can be seen. The angle has several benefits, Im too tired to write now.

Theres a few other tricks, shimming the riser out to prevent dips and dives along the back of the tread. staining and coating the treads before install leaving just the final. I have a pic of a staircase in the Things I Made thread.

Oh yea, have you measured all your rises? Codes usually say no more than 3/16" difference over the entire flight. Often, there are problems at the top and bottom tread in this regard. Plan ahead.
Making a long and straight cut like that with a jig saw sounds like quite a challenge but, YMMV. I use the belt sander with a #80 belt to adjust for small variations after using my circular saw.
Like the angle cut on the treads, I give the risers a slight back cut so a finer edge meets the skirt board.
If you lay your treads from bottom to top you have access to the backs of the risers so they can be fastened to the edges of the treads. Plus, you have something to kneel on when working. The downside is that you're loading an area with fresh glue so everything had better fit tightly.
It goes without saying the your stringers have been checked to be certain their surfaces are on the same level so the tread lays flat.
I could see using putty on nail heads but that's it on a stairway.
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Old 01-02-2013, 12:57 PM   #21
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Depending on access underneath, I put pocket screws in the bottom of the treads and pull the skirt up tight. Some times you have to make some clearance notches in the stinger for the driver.
Notching the wall skirt over the kicker and butting the tread to skirt also seeems to work best for me.
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