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Old 01-06-2013, 03:04 AM   #2206
Tirpse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colebatch View Post
Mongolian is nothing like Kazakh or Chinese. Its pretty unique. Mongolic is a language group all of its own. Its closest relatives are languages as diverse as Korean, Hungarian and Finnish - but they are very distant cousins. Kazakh is a Turkic language and closely related to all the other Turkic languages.
Well actually Mongolian language is currently considered to belong a group of Altaic languages where main groups are Turkic, Mongolic, Tungusic, Koreanic and Japonic languages. Hungarian and Finnish languages belongs to group known as Uralic languages or Finno-Uralic which is another language group.

"For much of the 19th and early 20th centuries, many linguists who studied Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic regarded them as members of a common Ural–Altaic family, together with Finno-Ugric and Samoyedic, based on such shared features as wovel hamony and agglutination. While the Ural–Altaic hypothesis can still be found in encyclopedias, atlases, and similar general references, it has not had any adherents in the linguistics community for decades. It has been characterized by Sergei Sarostin as "an idea now completely discarded"."

There is more information of this in here anyone interested http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altaic_languages

Good ride report as usual and i really like pictures so keep going on :) I am expecially interested to see how your bags are doing as i am considering them as one possible option as i sold my previous Wolfman luggages which served me well twice in Central Asia and Mongolia total time nealy 10 weeks.
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:32 AM   #2207
ROD CURRIE
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Oooooow!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tirpse View Post
Well actually Mongolian language is currently considered to belong a group of Altaic languages where main groups are Turkic, Mongolic, Tungusic, Koreanic and Japonic languages. Hungarian and Finnish languages belongs to group known as Uralic languages or Finno-Uralic which is another language group.

"For much of the 19th and early 20th centuries, many linguists who studied Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic regarded them as members of a common Ural–Altaic family, together with Finno-Ugric and Samoyedic, based on such shared features as wovel hamony and agglutination. While the Ural–Altaic hypothesis can still be found in encyclopedias, atlases, and similar general references, it has not had any adherents in the linguistics community for decades. It has been characterized by Sergei Sarostin as "an idea now completely discarded"."

There is more information of this in here anyone interested http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altaic_languages

Good ride report as usual and i really like pictures so keep going on :) I am expecially interested to see how your bags are doing as i am considering them as one possible option as i sold my previous Wolfman luggages which served me well twice in Central Asia and Mongolia total time nealy 10 weeks.
Thanks for that Tirpse...I think.
Now my head REALLY hurts, So maybe I'll post a little and we do a little riding. You all up for it?

ROD CURRIE screwed with this post 01-06-2013 at 04:47 AM
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:59 AM   #2208
ROD CURRIE
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Sponsorship

Treadless: Touché on the towrope comment.

Sponsorship: Sponsorship my arse! W gets to recoup a little of the expenses of these trips from DVD sales but I promise you he isn't about to retire to Mustique on the proceeds. He's approached lots of people but almost invariably gets the "bums rush" or is ignored. He approached a company selling outdoor-adventure meals last year and asked that they send him a couple to try?..........they sent him...a price list as they would you or me.
I'll go further, none of the guys selling these or their own DVDs -Adventure-Spec/Austin Vince/Neduro is getting fat on sales profits. They do it to evangelise this thing we all love so much.
A/Spec give us the clothing at cost as they are truly interested in testing the gear they promote in real world long term overlanding and the information we feed back is sent on to Klim to further improve their gear.
I promise you the support we get is so little its insignificant and we certainly aren't trying to promote anything.
Walter, put your Gin and Tonic down, step off the yacht and confirm please.
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:12 AM   #2209
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Day 60-I think (?)

It was a glorious sunny morning so we all had a little breakfast, packed our gear and hit the trail.
Today we were to see if Walters Google Earth-made trail would in fact glue together.
We'd only ridden for half an hour or so when we stopped to snap this snow-covered peak in the distance.

Photobucket

We rolled on just a mile or two more and one of us stopped to snap this little ger grouping

Photobucket.

Whilst we were doing this, a youth in traditional gear galloped over to us on his pony and we tried to say hello and chat. Sorry the pic's a little dark-this was an iPhone pic with the attendant camera limitations.
Photobucket
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:29 AM   #2210
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Ger life

We talked as well as we could for a few minutes and I realised as he was gesturing towards the ger group he was also saying "ger"..."ger" mixed up in all the rest if the dialogue. I had a light bulb moment (I don't get many) and realised he was asking us to go back to the family ger.

I pointed and gestured in the direction he was indicating and he nodded.
I'm always one to keep steaming on if possible but this was an offer too kind to refuse.
We scooted over to a pair of gers standing separately from the others and dismounted. The family came out to greet us and his cousin came over to inspect the bikes. One of them climbed on to Bas' airhead and though he couldn't touch down-he was maybe 14 years old-it looked like he knew his way round the bikes controls.
Bas had clearly made a competence judgement watching the kid so after a minute he pressed the started and pointed across the landscape. Christmas for that kid!!
He popped it in gear and we ran along beside the bike until he was rolling, then he rode off, kicking it up the through a couple of gears and climbed a long hill. I though he might bin it on the turn ( about a Km away but he was fine. I said to Bas.." but what if he wrecks it?"...he replied "if he wrecks it he wrecks it and we'll sort it". It was a very generous act with someone he didn't know.
Actually the kid was fine and he rode very steadily back towards us and we stopped him on the run-in the same way we'd held it on the way out.
We got him off the bike and the Mother came out of the ger and asked us in for tea. Lovely people.
We all trooped and and she bustled round doing what Mums do.

Photobucket.

As W has said, inside was a laptop and other consumer electronics , outside was solar panel, Uazik van and a moto.
She made us the milky salty tea they drink-it looks like it has dead flies in it but its some lumpy black stuff and some wee doughnuts without sugar.

I'm not quite sure of the domestic arrangements as there was a couple of lads about 14 and a girl about the same age. The Gers are pretty small inside so maybe the girls and Mum sleep in one ger and the guys in the other?
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:38 AM   #2211
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Ger life 2

The tea wasn't too unpleasant but if you empty it, its the custom that they refill your bowl immediately, so if you're not careful you'll be there all day until your back teeth are floating.

Here's Bongo Boy looking to score another doughnut-again, sorry about the pic. Being a baldy I get used to jokes about glare from my head-in this case it seems to have been true.

Photobucket

The boy with a portly gentleman.

Photobucket


Watch your head on the way out.

Photobucket
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:45 AM   #2212
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.......that's when the truck will arrive with the bikes".
So the truck arrived, the bikes were unloaded and all the Bad Boys ...Sales managers, dentists, lawyers, accountants, flew in, checked into the hotel,...donned their denim, bandanas and leather chaps and went down to the car park at the alotted time. Soon the air was shaking with the sound of 40 Harleys and Mean Dudes revving them up.....then they all set off down Duval..pulled in to Sloppy Joe's about 200 yards away...(the bar where Hemingway drank)...had a couple of beers each but then couldn't ride as they'd be over the limit. So the bikes stayed there 'til the next day when they were loaded back on the truck and carried back whence they came. You truly couldn't make it up.......
OMFG
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:56 AM   #2213
ROD CURRIE
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The days cools

We thanked the family for their kindness and rode away.

As we rode off a couple of riders on 2 stroke bikes joined us-one of them 2 up, so we wicked it up a little. These guys were flying on their little Russian bikes with budget 90/10 tyres, the guy who was pillion was standing on the pegs and holding on the the rider's coat shoulders -absolutely fearless. As we'd blast past on a wider bit they'd wave...but when we slowed down to check where we were going they'd scoot through.
We think riding offroad is an adventure ..they do it every day and though they've probably never been over 60 they can get those little bikes anywhere. Brilliant.

Photobucket

The sky was starting to cloud over a little and the temperature dropped considerably.
We came to the first river crossing of the day. This was the first of maybe 40 crossings, most of which were in fast flowing water, many with rocky bottoms so the bikes were pushed across on the clutch, sometimes with 3 guys supporting the bikes. Occasionally we get to one we could ride normally,and others were very deep but fortunately slow moving.
I think this is B -again, apologies for the Ipic. I'm hoping P will step in with some good pics of the day.

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Old 01-06-2013, 06:21 AM   #2214
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Up North ... Day 59 continued

After I left the Russian guy on his 990, the brutal thrashing I had given the bike began to take its toll. The track was particularly rough at this moment in time. I checked over the bike and noticed I was missing a bolt from my bashplate mounting. A close inspection also revealed the beginnings of a crack in my front subframe, the subframe that was welded up just before entering Kazakhstan.

If you missed that part, the front subframe holding the front fairing, instruments and lights cracked earlier in the trip. The info was passed back to Erik at Hot Rod who had made it and he redesigned the subframe on his CAD machine and would give me the new improved version when I got back to Europe, but for the remainder of this trip I would have to continue watching and repairing when necessary, the subframe I had.

There was obviously nowhere to repair it here. So I strapped it up with luggage straps and cable ties, strapped the bashplate up with cable ties, and rode on. By now it was after 5pm. I had 150 odd km left of this brutal rough road (before the asphalt started), which was now mostly dried mud. Mud that had been shapen while drying by numerous vehicle tracks. It was now like very rough cement and the bike was taking a beating. I would have to stop regularly to check the bike, check the front subframe bracing etc. I rode even slower to minimise the load on the patched up bike. Everytime I stopped to check the crack, it had grown larger. By 7:30pm it began getting dark. By now one side of the subframe was cracked through. More cable ties came out to act as additional bracing. I still have 70 km of horrible rough earth to ride. For the first time in the trip, instead of thrashing the bike, I was nursing it like I was carrying a cargo of eggs. It was pitch black and 9:30 pm when I reached the start of the asphalt. At least now the front subframe should be safe. I turned my wicked high beams on and powered down the unfenced Mongolian asphalt towards Bulgan.

From the quiet darkness of Bulgan to my destination, Erdenet was another 60 km. I reached Erdenet about 11:30pm and checked straight into a hotel. Erdenet is a big town (2nd in Mongolia after the capital UB), and home to the worlds 4th largest copper mine.

I was now just 2-3 hours from Russia.
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:38 AM   #2215
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Day 60 - Up North

I woke up knowing I had to be in Irkutsk tomorrow night and I had a bike being held together by cable ties.

But the distance was all on asphalt now, from Erdenet. I woke late. Yesterday had been a mammoth day, beginning at 7am and finishing almost at midnight. I had done 700 km yesterday, mostly on crappy tracks, not the nice fast smooth ones. And I had manage to keep the bike together and not let the front fall off. Now I could relax.

It was 600 km from Erdenet to Ulan Ude in Russia, where I would overnight. I crossed the border at lunchtime. I had pretty much done what I wanted to do, cross Mongolia in 2.5 days, despite losing 7 hours of riding time due to my wheel bearing problem. I enjoyed a long slow lunch on the Russian side and cruised slowly into Ulan Ude mid afternoon and checked into a Russian motel and went to bed early.

Tomorrow Irkutsk.
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Old 01-06-2013, 07:57 AM   #2216
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Nice nice nice!
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:13 AM   #2217
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Question for anyone of the group and thank you in advance if you have time to answer...hope its not a repeat question that I missed: I have several pairs of boots that are still decent to wear and one has a gortex liner. I have my opinions on this but I have never been in such a situation as any of you where your feet are wet daily and boots constantly full of water for this long. I have only had this happen for 3-4 days at most. For this ride and weather, are there advantages to gortex or similar liners in your boots or disadvantages. What about the health of your feet/skin?
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:26 AM   #2218
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Originally Posted by Aarrff View Post
Question for anyone of the group and thank you in advance if you have time to answer...hope its not a repeat question that I missed: I have several pairs of boots that are still decent to wear and one has a gortex liner. I have my opinions on this but I have never been in such a situation as any of you where your feet are wet daily and boots constantly full of water for this long. I have only had this happen for 3-4 days at most. For this ride and weather, are there advantages to gortex or similar liners in your boots or disadvantages. What about the health of your feet/skin?
Well gore tex will help your feet breath and won't let the water come in. At the end of the day they won't stink the hell out of your tent and will still feel light. Remember that you sweat at least a half whisky glass of sweat just out of your feet per day. I think having wet feet is the worst feeling you can get when you're walking. Imagine the kind of bacteria you'll have at the end of a 1 week trip without letting them breath. You know the feeling of you hanging around in Ski socks all day, that moisty thing around your toes...

Well that's my opinion, now let's here from the pros
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:28 AM   #2219
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Originally Posted by Aarrff View Post
Question for anyone of the group and thank you in advance if you have time to answer...hope its not a repeat question that I missed: I have several pairs of boots that are still decent to wear and one has a gortex liner. I have my opinions on this but I have never been in such a situation as any of you where your feet are wet daily and boots constantly full of water for this long. I have only had this happen for 3-4 days at most. For this ride and weather, are there advantages to gortex or similar liners in your boots or disadvantages. What about the health of your feet/skin?
Waterproof liners or socks are only useful for keeping out rain.

They are useless for keeping out water in water crossings that you might have to walk across or put your feet down in. And they are a major pain in the ass to dry once they get wet from watercrossings.

I carried a pair of seal skins for rainy days on asphalt / gravel roads. But on rainy days where you have water crossings, or even sunny days where you have water crossings, I just go for the normal socks.
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:32 AM   #2220
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Waterproof liners or socks are only useful for keeping out rain.

They are useless for keeping out water in water crossings that you might have to walk across or put your feet down in. And they are a major pain in the ass to dry once they get wet from watercrossings.
Ah...thank you and such has been my experience! We do have streams here in WNC where its smart to wade in before an attempt and my lined boots take forever to dry!
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