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Old 01-08-2013, 06:48 AM   #16
74C5
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Maybe these. No wires and fuses and seasonal.
http://www.dryguy.net/BootGlove.html

http://www.rei.com/product/679011/bootglove
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:04 PM   #17
dddd
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drymax socks may help, if you have a humidity problem that aggravate the situation.

otherwise, I have never been in a better setup than with my heated insoles. I still have cold toes and the heat should come from the top of the boot, imho. But I do ride near 0 celcius. Its expected. So I will look for actual heated boots, but no great hopes to find the perfect model. I will have a look a heated socks for sure...

For now, I'm not going back. The heated insoles stay in the boots (under the existing insole). The Y cable is running in the pant leg between the shell and the liner, so I never fiddle with it. The plug is exiting by the crotch then runnigg to the side. In a nutshell, the pants hide the cable well. The 9 levels dual port PCM controller is in the jacket pocket on the side where the plug is coming out. In have heated gloves too, which heat the outside of the hand, much more efficient than heated grips, less expensive and can use on other bikes provided the socket.
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Old 01-09-2013, 05:45 AM   #18
Jeff B
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From experience,

Nothing beats heated socks. Period. And connecting thru heated pants, is more convenient than extension wire. But all in all nothing else even comes close to the performance. You wear them over a thin pair of non cotton socks to avoid getting hotspots from the wires. Thin liner or dress socks will work fine. Just avoid cotton.

My only issue, [but I've accepted] is that if there is a failure in your heated gear. [it has happened] and your in a position that will matter, you need to carry a backup pair of heavy wool socks.



I tried heated insoles. They did not work nearly as well as the socks. I wouldn't reccommend them.

I've also used Dryguy Bootgloves for 3 years and they do help, but if you get the fabric strap wet and walk on it, it will wear thru very fast. If you have a stitching awl and means to keep, [and don't mind] repairing the strap then it would be cost effective. If you think this will be a problem, then you might spend to much $ replacing them as needed. Eventually the shifter wears thru any way. They extend the comfort zone enough to notice, but not a large margin.



I just bought a pair of each of these Neos Overboots to try over my Garne Oiled Balance boots. A pair of insulated, and a pair on uninsulated. I have not had the chance to try them out yet though. My concern is that they might be bulky enough to make shifting a problem. [especially the insulated version] And I'm not sure how long it'll take for the shifter to wear the instep. If they don't work out, I'll keep them for non riding use I guess.


http://www.overshoe.com/Pages/default.aspx



I'll post up how these work out.

Like I said earlier, nothing is like heated gear.
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:22 AM   #19
bmac
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You mentioned pant liners but you may still need something to keep the wind off of your legs. If your chest is not well insulated will first notice it that your hands get cold. If you do not keep your legs warm you will first notice it in your feet. Make sure you do everything possible to keep the wind off of your legs. They have a large amount of surface area and it is often neglected by the average rider.

My experience comes from working in a freezer for over 20 years and seeing every new guy have the same problem. Their hands and feet get cold first so the first thing they look at is better gloves and boots. In most cases better gloves and boots may help but they should take a much closer look at what they are doing to keep their chest and legs warmer.
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Old 01-09-2013, 12:28 PM   #20
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http://www.thermacell.com/heated-insoles-foot-warmers
these work and you can adjust the heat from your seat.
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:25 PM   #21
mattgw86
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Chemical foot warmers and wool socks. They won't make your feet "warm", but they won't be miserably cold.
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:41 PM   #22
Irish John
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Using plastic bags to create a Vapor Barrier Lining

When I know the ride is going to be very cold, I put a plastic produce bag over my foot, then a wool sock, then another plastic bag. The first one acts as a vapor barrier to keep your insulating layer/sock dry. Water in any form in an insulating layer draws heat away by conduction. The second layer over the sock, acts a an air barrier which allows the air trapped in the insulation to retain it's heat better. Used this trick in the military with good result.

You foot will sweat a little to start, until the moisture level reaches an equilibrium. After that it won't feel sweaty, clammy or cold until you stop for the day and remove the inner bag. When air reaches the skin at that time, it will feel damp and cold.
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Old 01-17-2013, 04:12 PM   #23
UncleDirt
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SealSkin socks.
Insulated boot.


Badda-bing.
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:14 PM   #24
Gham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmac View Post
You mentioned pant liners but you may still need something to keep the wind off of your legs. If your chest is not well insulated will first notice it that your hands get cold. If you do not keep your legs warm you will first notice it in your feet. Make sure you do everything possible to keep the wind off of your legs. They have a large amount of surface area and it is often neglected by the average rider.

My experience comes from working in a freezer for over 20 years and seeing every new guy have the same problem. Their hands and feet get cold first so the first thing they look at is better gloves and boots. In most cases better gloves and boots may help but they should take a much closer look at what they are doing to keep their chest and legs warmer.
Never would have thought that! Very interesting observation,thanks
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