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Old 01-11-2013, 03:30 PM   #31
The Savage Rabbit OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowwhat View Post
Sell the KLR for a couple grand....put that money into the perfectly good low mileage 950..and ride the hell out of it...That bike looked great.....
That would be the easiest thing to do. I could use the money for the KLR to pay for a new fuel pump and some of the other suggested fixes. I have no mechanical skills or experience so doing this type of stuff myself is waaaay over my head. Then I just have the guilt of the 950 being slightly duplicative of the Harley in that the 950 can do everything the Harley can do on the road.
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Old 01-11-2013, 04:51 PM   #32
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[QUOTE= Then I just have the guilt of the 950 being slightly duplicative of the Harley in that the 950 can do everything the Harley can do on the road.[/QUOTE]

I think this is technically correct in a general sense.. The 950 is taller, handles better and stops faster (without knobbies). You can see over traffic while lane splitting and react to idiots much quicker. If you commute and value safety you'll learn to appreciate these qualities. Of course the bikes height is a liability in the wind but it's also a much cooler bike......
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Old 01-11-2013, 05:02 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by ykrweb View Post
I think this is technically correct in a general sense.. The 950 is taller, handles better and stops faster (without knobbies). You can see over traffic while lane splitting and react to idiots much quicker. If you commute and value safety you'll learn to appreciate these qualities. Of course the bikes height is a liability in the wind but it's also a much cooler bike......
Cooler? Oh, dude, you must not have seen my chaps, fingerless gloves, the bitchen leather tassles I have comin' off the grips, and my 1/4 helmet with the Kaiser spike on the top. You don't know me! You don't know my crew! Sorry, I get carried away when in "harley guy" mode.

Ya, I commute on my bikes. I have a facebook page called Motorcycle Commuter. Started it because the webforums usually didn't talk about commuting issues.
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Old 01-11-2013, 05:52 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Savage Rabbit View Post
Cooler? Oh, dude, you must not have seen my chaps, fingerless gloves, the bitchen leather tassles I have comin' off the grips, and my 1/4 helmet with the Kaiser spike on the top.

Got pics?

Glad to here that KTM stepped up.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:43 PM   #35
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Keep the 950!!!

Hey TSR,

Dump the other bikes and keep the 950. Owning an early Adventure is the best way to get introduced into the product line. 8k miles is break in for that bike. There are nuances to these bikes that as everyone has suggested you need to familiarize yourself with in the HOW. You will need to get several good service resources/ mechanics if you don't trust yourself with a wrench. Service on these bikes is not cheap. Basic oil and filter changes require a shop to bill you for tank removal. There is a series of part upgrades that keep this bike reliable... it's the price of admission here. You just have to bite the bullet and pay to play.

But the ride experience it well worth the fees. Once you get caught up on upgrades you will reach a point where the overhead goes down and the fun factor goes through the roof. And the Adventure is a bike you'll continue to grow into. The best part is when you are dialing in your preference of travel bags and multi day camping trips. Then you'll know you've truly arrived!!!



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Old 01-12-2013, 05:36 AM   #36
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Laugh

I feel your pain. I bought a black 2005.5 with 6500 miles in 2011. Since then, I have replaced the water pump seal, battery, fuel pump, and clutch slave. I'm pretty sure my next project is the starter torque limiter. She clacks a little on start up. I did all the work myself but the $$$ for parts adds up fast. The ex girlfriend couldn't understand why I kept a motorcycle that needed so much work but then again she never drove it I would suggest learning how to work on the bike. You will save some money and more importantly gain some knowledge that could save your ass if you ever take her off the beaten path. Good luck.
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Old 01-12-2013, 06:33 AM   #37
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Basic repairs and maintenance, and side stand switch...

I tend to agree with learning to service wear items yourself. I have a small shop and restore old Hondas and Yamahas to control my ADD or whatever it is called when you can't sit still or watch TV.
I replaced the clutch slave cylinder which was leaking on my 2004 KTM 950 ADV and various other wear type items.
Obviously I don't have electronic equipment or "special" tools so would leave any major repairs to my local KTM shop.
I've been dealing with them and KTM for over 25 years. (1986 KTM 250, evil and wicked machine).
Oh, and there is a video of how to replace nearly anything on You Tube. Spend a few minutes watching it and then go out and do it.
It's also good to learn what to do when you rip the wires out of the kickstand safety switch while accidentally taking a hero section with the wife on the back, in the rain, at the Hancock Dual Sport.
Hint: at least two of the three have to be stripped and wired together or your bike will start and run great until you let the clutch out.
Thank you dirt bike rider who stopped to help us with that basic knowledge. I was ready to push pull or walk but we were in an extreme location with deep mud and huge rocks, thus the initial hit.
Which two wires? He said try these two, "it will either work or catch on fire" more likely blow a fuse, lol.
It worked. I've kept it taped up with the same electrical tape since then. No safety switch.
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Old 01-12-2013, 10:33 AM   #38
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There are three kinds of KTM owners. Group 1: Those with abundant disposable income to let a dealer do all the work. Group 2: Those who are comfortable wrenching on a bike so do just about everything themselves. Group 3: Those who know the way to get knowledgable friends to help them involves offering beer and possibly some steaks on the grill.

Moral of the story is if you are not currently a member of Group 2 or 3 I suggest you become a member.

Outside of a complete engine rebuild requiring machining and/or ridiculously expensive speciality tools there is nothing mysterious or out of the ordinary about working on a 950. I have rejetted, performed valve adjustments, done the H2O pump etc. Nothing to it that a little bit of mechanical skill and patience will overcome. Only thing to date that I have had done outside or my own garage is the suspension, simply due to the fact that my lovely wife does not like hearing me cuss that much.
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Old 01-12-2013, 09:25 PM   #39
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I'm leaning towards keeping the 950. i have zero experience in working on anything mechanical and the leople i know who do, know nothing about motorcycles. Presently, it sounds like the only way to be able to trust the bike is to have a shop preemptively replace the fuel pump, check the bolts on the clutch pressure plates, and replace (?) the clutch slave cylinder. Clearly, doing it myself would be ideal. But I am so clueless about working on machines that it seems impossible to do myslef. I don't even know what a clutch slave cylinder is. I accept that I may get flamed for that. My dad taught me to hunt. We never did anything mechanical. He didn't even change his own tires. I think I'm the only one in my family who has ever changed their own oil. So, paying a shop to get this 950 on the road and reliable now seems to be my only option.

Pay the money to make the 950 reliable or simplify my stable of bikes by replacing the 950 and the Softail with a 990? That's my current quandary. Which, is of course a nice problem to have. Would be nice to reduce my insurance and registration costs. I rode the Softail 400 miles to Tonopah today. Bike just isn't as fun as the 950/990 platform. It's 10 degrees here right now, by the way. Last 30 miles were on a frozen highway.

Are the new 990s generally more reliable? Seems like 90% of the known problems on the HOW pertain to the 950s. Granted, they're older. But the 990 has been around for awhile.
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Old 01-13-2013, 08:32 AM   #40
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Decisions decisions...

Savage rabbit, consolidate and update. I'm all about reducing the amount of vehicles that require inspection and insurance. I have a ton, (several dozen vintage bikes) but have no regrets about keeping them around as they aren't costing me anything or going down in value. It drives me crazy to see a bike unused and depreciating at the same time!
Having a shop do your work is great if you know them. They will do the work in a clean, well lit environment with the correct factory tools and manuals. It's best to recognize that you are not mechanically inclined and not screw stuff up or make a mess in a shop or garage you may not even have. I have a well lit shop with a wood stove and air lift table. I have only basic repair skills but enjoy light maintenance: changing chains and sprockets, fluids, certain seals, accessories, etc... I love working on the bikes. If you don't have the set up for it just take it into the shop.
I'm all in and rolling the dice with my new 990 R. One of the last of the breed. My 950 was great after working out all of the 2004 problems. It was a beast. We had water pump issues ( I think the shop said the impeller may have actually been in backwards or something, I forget but they finally sorted it out.) I like the idea of EFI and staying updated, thus the 990.
For ME: Harley's are one of those bikes that you don't really love to ride or own but miss them when you don't have them. I keep buying them and selling them. I've sworn off buying any more because I know I will just want to sell it then.
Now your Ducati, that's another story. I have a sweet spot for track bikes and recently got my racing license and competed in my first few CCS races. That's the best thing ever, besides dual sporting and road trips.
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:10 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Savage Rabbit View Post
Presently, it sounds like the only way to be able to trust the bike is to have a shop preemptively replace the fuel pump, check the bolts on the clutch pressure plates, and replace (?) the clutch slave cylinder.
The only way to 100% trust any bike is to leave it in the garage. No bike is totally reliable. It sounds like you're doing a good job of worrying too much. reading too many posts here and talking yourself out of the 950. The fuel pump filters on the 990 have issues leading to fuel starvation and replacing those, would it sounds like, be beyond your skills also.

I was clueless about working on my bikes once, I started by changing the oil on my 1989 CB-1 and worked up from there. You have to start somewhere and if you never do, you'll never improve. If you have to start paying the dealer to do your 9x0 oil changes, the cost of ownership is going to start adding up fast.

Checking the clutch pressure plates would be a good thing to do (TSB), they are easily accessible and it shouldn't cost much. You could add a Dr Bean electronic switch to the fuel pump (someone local to you would help you I expect, if you ask). I'd leave the clutch slave alone, it's the least likely item to fail.
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Old 01-13-2013, 10:21 AM   #42
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I've changes the oil on my KLR, changed the cs sprockets on the KLR, and fz1, and sync'd the throttle bodies on the fz1 u see supervision (didn't do any good). But never lifted a tank off or opened an engine up.

When I bought the 950, I read the HoW page and assumes the chances or those things going wrong in my bike were low because only some units displayed each problem. Then bam, 2 biguns in a month.
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Old 01-13-2013, 10:59 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoTiredRiders View Post
Which two wires? He said try these two, "it will either work or catch on fire" more likely blow a fuse, lol.

great signature line....
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Old 01-13-2013, 11:33 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Savage Rabbit View Post
I've changes the oil on my KLR, changed the cs sprockets on the KLR, and fz1, and sync'd the throttle bodies on the fz1 u see supervision (didn't do any good). But never lifted a tank off or opened an engine up.

When I bought the 950, I read the HoW page and assumes the chances or those things going wrong in my bike were low because only some units displayed each problem. Then bam, 2 biguns in a month.
The oil change on the 9x0 is much more complex than the KLR, there are ways to reduce this extra complexity but not to completely remove it. True your 950 could be cursed but statistically this is unlikely, you're already committed to doing the water pump so a second failure here is just as likely as with a new 990. KTM is going to fix the generator side, assuming that this implies ever other issue in the HOW is now certain to occur isnt logical.

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Old 01-13-2013, 01:45 PM   #45
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KTM, dealerships, TSBs

Sorry to hear about your bike. It's well worth the time & frustration if you have an ounce of adventure in your veins!

KTM North America is actually a bunch of really good people- they do "Goodwill Warranty" work more often than not once they hear the story & it is reasonable. There are bad customers too- a friend finally had Kawasaki NA swap an abused 2010 KLR650 for a 650 Versus just to end his 5-year warranty. He was just that loud (and hard on stuff) that they rebuilt his engine a couple of times and even given him a complete engine once. KTM NA doesn't suffer fools, as the old saying goes. They'll also have a serious discussion with the dealership if a problem exists.

A good KTM service manager will plug your bikes VIN into the KTM NA corporate web interface as he takes your bike in & can provide you with data on your bike- when it was made, when it was sold, where, and to whom. Any open (uncompleted) TSB's that are applicable to your bike should show up on the history. It's a good way to let the customer know you're looking out for them, and helps develop a good relationship on both ends- cause your trying to help the guy ride & his mount happy. The ownership list isn't kept up to date on all bikes unless someone along the way updates the owner information, which is one way KTM NA can keep track of bikes and (where applicable) mail or email any safety issues that (might) pertain to your bike. Saftey recalls are handled through a combination of KTM, DOT & the US government. TSB's don't warrant a certified letter to your house.

The Technical Service Bulletins which are the factorys way of letting dealerships know that certain bikes need updates or changes that have been noted by KTM Austria either from warranty/field experience or factory technicians rigorous testing. CPModem has them available through the HOW, and there are a lot over the years. The service manager should thouroughly search the database to make sure your bike doesn't have any outstanding. Some of the older TSBs that are uncompleted don't show up so it takes a bit of research. When the dealer starts a claim on your bike if they enter the VIN & then the TSB recall number the computer will immediately kick back any aren't valid or have already been paid on by KTM NA. I have definitely worked on bikes where other KTM NA dealerships did not do the work but the customer was told it was- hopefully that isn't the case but people are people. Again, KTM NA welcomes cutomer input on relevant issues- they want us to have fun riding their bikes!

The dealer only gets paid for TSBs when the proper computer work is completed. In some cases the TSB was performed and the service manager/technician didn't log work performed- in which case the dealership paid for the work & your history is dubious at best. Many TSB parts are sent to dealerships as regular (superceded perhaps) inventory so the mechanic simply pulls it & does the job. Like warranty work (in general, all manufacturers) the time alotted a job is for a clean, unmodified bike that you are familiar with. A mechanic that is "learning" on your bike or encountering rusted/stripped fasteners is going to take longer and the chance of something being overlooked, a hose or electrical wire pinched increases. But the dealer by no means makes a bunch money on TSBs or the parts. Some TSBs are so fast you can do them in a few minutes once you're familiar with them.

any TSB parts are either to be kept with the bikes VIN information for a certain number of years or sent back to KTM NAfor verification for reimbursal and in some cases examined at KTM NA or sent back to the KTM Austrian factory.

Next time you go into any KTM dealership provide them with the last 6 numbers of your VIN and they can look your bike up for you!
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