ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-11-2013, 04:37 PM   #91
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
Hey Wander thanks for commenting. It's really nice to get feedback!

I'm not sure if Randy was recording at the time (he does have a helmet cam) so I'll ask him about it and maybe we'll even look at some of his videos (harder now that his laptop is broken ) and perhaps post one or two (although I probably won't edit them as I hardly even edit my photos).
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 05:49 PM   #92
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
01/06/2013 Goodbye coast: Heading inland.

The night before I was browsing the web and noticed that Puebla looked like a great city to visit. So after discussing it for about 30 seconds we agreed to go there the next day. It's really great not having a set schedule or route. Conveniently there is a narrow, curvy road that heads directly north out of San Marcos and eventually hooks up with a major road towards Puebla.The road was under construction in San Marcos so we had to take some back alleys down to the river, cross it (my first river crossing in Mexico [and nothing to speak of]) and find some back alleys back to the road on the other side.

Into the mountains.


The narrow curvy road took us up into the mountains, through tiny, remote villages (over topes and around potholes) and past farming land. I doubt many people travel through here as we were stared at by everyone we passed. An aside: It seems like this is the season of baby animals (although I didn't get any pictures). We saw baby cows, horses, burros, dogs and many, very cute baby pigs.

Local life.


Drying flowers?


Trying a behind the back shot.


Burros. They're stubborn. We had to go around.




Road quality.




Once we hit the main road the going got faster, but not less interesting. As we crossed the mountains, the climate once again changed from coastal forest to high desert. I randomly spotted a “Zona Archeologica” sign and we decided to investigate. We found what turned out to be the Tehuacalco Ruins, of the Yope people (my first ruins on this trip).

The daily shot. You know it!


It's good that I started exploration of ruins here as these are small (in comparison to many) and that leaves room to be further impressed. If I visited the very biggest and best ruins first, all others would be a disappointment. Now, when I see the next Zona Archeologica I may still be thrilled and amazed.

Main temple.


Did they really play with human heads?


Me, next to a stelae.




After spending a couple of hours exploring the ruins, we continued north to Puebla. The riding was a mix of slower back roads and fast, major highways, some of them with tolls. In fact, unlike in some of the more northern states that charge half price tolls for motorcycles, Puebla (the state) charges the same amount as for cars. Just one of the tolls (and there were several) close to Puebla cost me 117 pesos!! That's more than I pay for a room some nights!



Into the desert.






It turned dark before we arrived in the city, and at one of the entrance ramps to a toll road I was stopped by the police for the first time in Mexico. The officer who came to check me out spoke no English (Randy got the English speaker) so it was a bit difficult to converse. He was looking for drugs and was surprisingly thorough in his search. Not only did I have to open all my cases (expected), but he made me explain (or at least try to explain) what each item was. For some reason he did not recognize an electric razor OR a disposable razor for what they were. I had to mime the use of the razor on another cops face for him to understand (the same held for many other items). Strange. He also thoroughly searched my wallet which seemed a little odd (but he didn't take any cash). After not finding any contraband he let me continue on my way.



As I peaked the hilltop overlooking Puebla I was surprised by the shear size of the city. It was a bit intimidating looking down and the expanse of lights in the valley below. “Navigating this place may be a bit of a challenge” I thought to myself. It was, in fact, not bad at all. The previous night I GPSed some hostels and set way-points so they wouldn't be too hard to find. After a few wrong turns and one way streets we found the place we were looking for. It turned out to be more of a “room for rent” than a hostel, but it was late, dark and I was tired so we stayed the night at Hostel Popocatepetl. For the record, the proprietor was a really nice man and he was very organized.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 11:38 PM   #93
Pete_Tallahassee
Out Standing Member
 
Pete_Tallahassee's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Tallahassee. FL. USA
Oddometer: 126
I am really enjoying your ride report.
I've had the military do some thorough searching at check points but never the police and never my wallet.
Stay cool.
Pete_Tallahassee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 07:05 AM   #94
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete_Tallahassee View Post
I am really enjoying your ride report.
I've had the military do some thorough searching at check points but never the police and never my wallet.
Stay cool.
Great to hear from you Pete. Yeah, the cop went a little overboard I think. And I guess having all my clothes in sealed plastic bags didn't help his suspicions any But at least he didn't dig through those too. I would have been there all night.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 07:31 AM   #95
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
01/07/13 Exploring Puebla

Hostel Popocatepetl.


There was nothing wrong with the hostel we were staying in (well, the vicious dog barking at [and slobbering on] us from the roof maybe), however, hostels are for social interaction and that wasn't happening at Popocatepetl, as we were the only ones there. I had two other hostels GPSed so I decided to leave my baggage (Randy kept his) and explore Puebla while looking for another hostel. We rode to the town center, passing monuments, cathedrals, museums and all manner of cultural wonders. Puebla is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Main Cathedral.


The streets of Puebla.


We found the hostel we were looking for a mere 4 blocks from the Zocalo (main central square). Hostel Santo Domingo has a large courtyard, a small cafe and both private rooms and dorms. They found us parking in a small courtyard at the back which required us to ride through the courtyard/cafe. I really liked the look of the place and suspected that there would be other travelers here (eventually) so we decided to move in.

Not the hostel (didn't take photos) .


A couple of blocks from the original hostel I was forced to do some lane splitting (no luggage) to get on the right street and lost Randy (luggage, no splitting). Now normally this wouldn’t be a big deal, but with no communication in a strange (to us) city and with Randy's troubles navigating (in cities only [for the most part]), this was trouble. I doubled back, but he was already gone. After waiting for him at the last known location for a while, I returned to the hostel and there he was waiting. Luckily we wandered the area the night before and enough was familiar that he found his way. I think I'm supposed to learn a lesson from this...

Mexican Pro-wrestling Arena


We moved into the new hostel, but were currently the only guests. Hopefully social interaction will ensue at some point. Apparently you pay a premium for it. We checked a few hotels nearby and it was cheaper for us to get our own private rooms (each) then it was to sleep in the bunk bed in a dorm at the hostel. Strange. Anyway, it was time to explore the city on foot for a while.

Puebla sites.






We wandered the streets looking at sites, smelling smells, hearing sounds and tasting the gastromonica. Puebla is beautiful. At one point we wandered into the tourist info office to get a map and met a guy named Roberto. He gave us an interesting tip: If we went to the main cathedral at 4pm, asked for Mr. Felix, maybe he would take us up to the top of the towers (tallest towers in Mexico [they say], where tourists are not permitted [they say] with amazing views of the volcanoes [they say]). Unfortunately, when we showed up at 4-ish and asked for Senior Felix, either something was lost in translation or he didn't exist, or he wasn't working that day. The conversation was very hushed (inside the cathedral) and there was no satisfactory explanation. Perhaps we'll try again tomorrow.

Tallest towers in Mexico?


More sites.




Deep fried potato pie thingy...




Back at the hostel a few backpackers moved in. I met some interesting people and had some interesting conversations. Got some interesting tips on where to go and what to do.

__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 07:38 PM   #96
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
01/08/13 Puebla surrounds.

As most museums are closed on Mondays, I had a few more spots to check out in town before heading to Cholula, where the Spanish built a church (in 1594) on top of the biggest pyramid in the Americas (which was buried and looked like a hill at the time). The plan was to see some cathedrals, visit a neighborhood of murals, check out the fort to the north with supposedly good views of the volcanoes, see the smallest volcano in the world (located in a neighborhood of Puebla to the north), then ride to Cholula, 15 Kms to the west to see the ruins and finally ride up to the saddle between the 2nd and 3rd largest mountains (volcanoes, one active) in Mexico via a dirt road. Needless to say, I bit off more than I could chew, but with no adverse affects, as there is lots of time to get to everything.

The following was accomplished:

Saw the Cathedral and library. Tried to interpret some art. Beautiful and interesting.









Visited the neighborhood of murals. Nice example of modern urban art revitalizing a poverty stricken area.









Checked out the fort to the north. The views were not so great as it was hazy.







Saw the smallest volcano in the world. It was closed for renovation so we could only see it from behind the fence. We did go into the market next door and ate some incredible mushroom quesadillas. We must have been a novelty there as people stared at us, tried to help us and would not leave until they saw us eat. People are so nice here!



Tortilla machine.


Rode the Cholula to see the largest pyramid in the Americas and the church sitting on top. There are 8 Kms of tunnels running through the pyramid. Some parts of it are exposed, but most of the structure is underground. Search as I might, I could not discover the reason for why it was under so much dirt (maybe as much as 4 meters in places)! Volcanic eruption? Build up of soil over time? Intentional burial? All I can do is speculate.



Entering via the tunnels.


The church.


Views from the top.




Some other site we didn't visit.


The pyramid ruins.




An alter.






Randy chillin after the climb up.


Parting shot.


After Cholula is was getting late so we headed back to Puebla and the hostel. It was getting dark by the time we got back so the decision was a wise one. The hostel was filling up with travelers and we met a cool guy from Florida who quit his job to travel the Americas indefinitely. It was the first time I went to a bar in Mexico. Fun. Tomorrow we ride across the saddle and towards Teotihuacan (established around 100 BC!), a large pyramidal complex just northeast of Mexico City. The navigating aspect of that adventure should be a fascinating experience.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 04:30 AM   #97
Sunday Rider
Adventurer Wanabe
 
Sunday Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: North of T.Ho., Ontario
Oddometer: 613
Wow, what great pictures.

The Cathedral ceiling is impressive craftsmanship.

Thanks for posting, as I am sure this takes so much time and effort after a long days adventure.
__________________
'97 Honda ST1100
Sunday Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 09:26 AM   #98
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunday Rider View Post
Wow, what great pictures.

The Cathedral ceiling is impressive craftsmanship.

Thanks for posting, as I am sure this takes so much time and effort after a long days adventure.
Thanks for the feedback Sunday! The RR gives me something to do when it gets dark It does take quite a bit of time (as can be witnessed by how far behind I am) but it's great to have a daily "journal" for memories in the future. I'm usually bad at keeping a good record so seeing the RR slip to the second or third page motivates me to update
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 10:17 AM   #99
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
01/09/2013 Over the saddle and through the woods...

It was time to bid Puebla farewell and head north again (Panama will have to wait) to cross the saddle and see Teotihuacan. Also, there are a couple of towns (Zacatlan and Cuetzalan [Spoiler: the area between them is perhaps the most beautiful place on earth?]) slightly northeast of there that have some impressive waterfalls (I heard) that I might as well see while I'm in the area. (Sorry that was a very convoluted sentence made over several edits)

We retraced our steps to Cholula and headed west via some small, local roads. Eventually we reached San Nicolas de Los Ranchos and shortly after that the road turned to dirt. The entire time after leaving Cholula we had one of the two volcanoes in our view and I was quite excited to climb to higher elevations and have a better look.

Cholula again.


Aiming in between.






San Nicolas de Los Ranchos.




Daily bike shot (1).


Daily bike shot (2 on dirt). Had to do it...


The dirt road was in good repair and very fun to ride. I actually got to air down the tires (it's was rather rocky with areas of soft sand) which made it seem all the more like a real adventure. As the road climbed higher, the climate changed from high desert, to my favorite: conifer forest! It was a beautiful ride through pine, fir and even spruce (I think) and the smells were amazing. Perhaps my favorite area of Mexico so far. The saddle between the mountains is at 12,000 ft. and the bikes were definitely feeling it.

Randy shot.


Me.


I look to my left:


I look to my right:


Elevation.


The dirt road ended at a visitor center, and was replaced by a paved road going down the other side, by which most guests arrive. I met a Swedish guy there who was trying to summit the smaller of the two peaks (17,160 ft., the taller [17,802 ft] is off limits due to volcanic activity). He was staying at a cabin there as the weather did not permit him to make the ascent that day.

Okay, one more


A nice spot to re-inflate tires and do some chain maintenance.


After re-inflating the tires once on pavement, we rode down the fun, curvy, paved road to a highway heading towards Mexico City. Once again I though that this is perhaps the most fun road I've ridden to date. There are so many of those here, it's really quite amazing. This area is breathtakingly beautiful!

I love mountains and forest!!






Towards Mexico City.


The rest of the ride was via larger roads that were not as much fun except in their complexity of navigation. Construction, lack of signs and roads that looked like they headed towards our destination, only to curve towards a completely different direction made for some wrong turns and turn-arounds. Luckily I laid out a series of waypoints on the GPS to keep me on the right track. I think it's more fun that way then to let the GPS route me to where (it thinks) I'm going, especially since whenever I try, it takes me via some illogical (and rather inconvenient, not to mention indirect) way.



Upon arrival at San Martin de las Perámides and going through the usual tour of hotels looking for a cheap one (a tradition I am particularly not fond of) we found a hotel (Hotel San Martin) for the night. As it wasn't too late yet, we sauntered down to the town center for some street food. While trying to order tacos I met a Mexican man who spoke a little English that tried to help us out. He later left and came back with his sons so that they could practice speaking English with us. I could tell the sons were embarrassed (and fully empathized with them) as it brought back memories of having to translate for my dad when we first moved to the USA. Why is it that parents expect you to speak good English (and immediately forget that they speak some too) if you just happen to know a few more words?

Hotel San Martin.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 11:40 AM   #100
OldPete
Be aware
 
OldPete's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Los Alamitos, CA
Oddometer: 3,174
Very enjoyable read Otheories.

Many of your posts bring me into the moment, just like being there.
OldPete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 12:12 PM   #101
Hevy Kevy
ADDRider
 
Hevy Kevy's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Elora Ontario
Oddometer: 159
IN!! Great ride, great read!
Hevy Kevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 04:48 PM   #102
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldPete View Post
Very enjoyable read Otheories.

Many of your posts bring me into the moment, just like being there.
Thanks for the kind words Pete! oh and for the record its 0theories (zero) as in "I have no idea"
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 04:51 PM   #103
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hevy Kevy View Post
IN!! Great ride, great read!
Welcome Hevy Kevy!
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 05:02 PM   #104
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
01/10/2013 Teotihuacan - "where man met the gods"

Woke up to a beautiful, sunny day and decided to get an early start on exploring Teotihuacan. When the sun reveals her true strength, I want to be moving fast, on a bike, carving some twisties, not wandering around solid stone, baking ruins tempting heat stroke. I packed up and we rode the 2Km or so to the entrance. The cost to get in was reasonable and the cost to park was about as much. No discount for motorcycles, but this is a pretty touristy area so, se la vie.

The pyramid of the moon.


The pyramid of the sun (or perhaps water).


Looking down the Avenue of the Dead.


Teotihuacan is one of the largest temple complexes in Mexico. It's OLD with several (I think they discovered eight) layers of buildings stacked one on top of the other. There was a sign that said something in Spanish and then showed Russian nested dolls (Matroyshkas) and an onion. The illustration spoke for itself.

It actually stretches quite a ways past the Sun pyramid.


Jaguar-Bird-Lizard (or something... [Damn you South Park! You ruin everything!])


Well preserved carvings.


Layer upon layer...


For the first time in over two weeks there were plenty of gringo tourists to be seen. It was strange really, not being the only gringos around. I like to play a game where I try to guess where the other tourists are from by their appearance and whatever I can catch them saying (without being too intrusive). As I explored the complex I met several people, including a small group of students from Yale (except for Mike, I thought they were from Korea or China, but their English was excellent which confused me), on their last stop in Mexico before heading home to start a new semester of classes. It was actually kind of nice to speak English with someone other than Randy for a change.

Sun (or water) pyramid.


You can see some people at the top. It's big.


Temple of Quetzalcoatl.






Done. Lunch in San Martin de las Perámides.


Once we thoroughly explored the ruins, it was time to ride to Zacatlan, a “Pueblo Mágico” in the mountains to the east (and slightly north). There is a series of towns around Mexico designated Pueblo Mágico(s) to promote their beauty, culture and history. I was going there primarily for the waterfalls, but what I discovered was so much more.

Mex 132.






Coffee break with some caballeros.


The road there was mostly straight forward two-lane highway (Mex 132) with sections of sharp curves thrown in to break up the monotony. The ruins took longer to explore then I originally anticipated and since we managed to avoid all the tolls (and thereby went slower than we could have), we arrived at Zacatlan just as the sun was beginning to set. As I pulled up over the last hill towards Zacatlan, my breath caught in my throat from the beauty I witnessed. I could barely breathe, and if it was the last site I ever saw, I would not regret it! Zacatlan sits on the edge of a huge cliff dropping off into a gorge. That late in the evening the gorge was full of clouds (below us) with the peaks of mountains projecting like islands in a sea. No pictures could do that view justice, and especially none taken by me with my camera.

Use your imagination...


Riding into the clouds.




In the town zócalo (central square) we stopped by a tourist info office to ask for directions to some hotels/hostels. There was one young woman there that spoke some English and she tried to help us. Alas, as everywhere else we tried in Mexico, the directions were worse than no help at all and after riding around town until well after dark, we finally found a hotel (Hotel San Pedro) with reasonable rates, if higher still than we would have liked to pay. It was a long day with lots of sun, so after wandering about town for a bit I crashed out for the night.
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2013, 07:24 PM   #105
0theories OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Eugene, OR
Oddometer: 291
01/11/2013 Waterfalls, gorges and some dirt.

What brought me to Zacatlan were the waterfalls, and to the waterfalls I went. There were three on my list: The San Pedro, a small waterfall just south of town, the Quetzalapan, further south of town, and the Tuliman waterfall, which actually turned out to be the bottom part of Quetzalapan. Of the three, the most impressive by far is Tuliman. The park which contains it actually has all kinds of things to do and see (like hiking, camping, zip lines etc.) and one could easily spend the whole day here. Quetzalapan has its own entrance (and entrance fee) and although nice, I would have skipped it if I didn't see it before continuing to Tuliman.

Leaving Hotel San Perdro in the morning (sans baggage).


Zacatlan on the edge of the gorge.


Bridge to San Pedro waterfall.


Daily bike shot.


The little falls.




After seeing San Pedro, we took a random road that wound its way into the gorge and up the other side to a small town. The town of San Miguel Tenango is lovely and dirt roads continued further down the gorge in several directions, but we turned around to go see the other waterfalls before completely committing to the gorge.

One of several roads into the gorge.


The river runs through it.


Up the other side.


You can see the road leading away from Zacatlan.


The ride from Quetzalapan to Tuliman involved descending into the gorge along a very steep dirt road, around many hairpin bends. It was fun and we were greeted by a nice Mexican man about ¾ of the way down who showed us the trail to the waterfall. It wasn't a long hike, but very pretty. After the waterfall, he also showed us the cabanas where people stay if they prefer lodging outside of town. It wasn't that much more expensive than the hotels in town, and had a wonderful, tranquil ambiance.

Quetzalapan (accessible only from the top).


View into the gorge.


Trail to Tuliman.






Tuliman (at least three levels).


You get a free mist shower with your entry fee.


Portrait.


After the waterfall trail, the road continued its descent to the bottom of the gorge with camping and hiking at the confluence of two rivers. It was very pretty and I would have enjoyed camping there, but I already paid for another nigh at the hotel, so was committed to returning to town. Randy and I hiked around for a while, crossing the rivers over boulders and exploring upstream for a bit. I would have liked to spend more time there, but we still had a dirt road that wound it's way through the gorge to explore.

Dos Rios.






Some wildlife (don't think it's venomous).


Gorge view riding out.


After the waterfall, we took a dirt road south and made our way around to the town of Chignahuapan. There we stopped at a small restaurant owned by a fellow bike aficionado who just sold his 800GS to get a Harley (he's a member of the Puebla BMW Club he said). We ate a great lunch and headed back north to Zacatlan.

Chignahuapan zocalo.


From there we took a road to the east that ran out of town, down into the gorge and then wound it's way to the north. To date, this was perhaps one of the most challenging roads I have ridden. I'm sure it's nothing compared to the descent into Copper Canyon, but it sure felt like how it was described to me. The road was smooth and hard in the straight sections, but littered with loose gravel and baby-head rocks in the corners. It was very steep and very sinuous! And very fun! I only almost dropped the bike once, so it couldn't have been too bad. I took almost no pictures as the riding was intense and I was concentrating.

The cool bridge (photo by Randy):


We made our way to the bottom, crossed the river (via a very cool bridge) and slowly, over many double-backs climbed up the other side. I think this road would have been a perfect candidate for airing down the tires, but I neglected to do so. Still, no harm done so it was all good. The road continued around the other side of the gorge and eventually brought us to a small town (Ahuacatlan) where pavement began once again. There appear to be endless dirt roads to explore here, leading to some of the most beautiful views I have seen to date. I highly recommend this area to anyone visiting central Mexico.

Coming out of the gorge.


Ahuacatlan.




Another incredibly curvy (but this time paved) road brought us back to Zacatlan as it was getting dark. The roads here are so curvy that the GPS can't keep up with them. As I review my tracks, there are points all over the place, forward, back, to the side; I'm trying to fix some of them, but if anyone ever sees these tracks, take note that it's just too much curves for a GPS to handle. That should tell you something about the level of fun they are. This makes the coast road seem almost like a straight line in comparison (scraping baggage and all)!
__________________
Enthusiastically skeptical...
KLR650, VFR800

Oregon to Panama RR (Guatemala actually...)
KLR Build Thread
0theories is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014