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Old 01-14-2013, 05:28 PM   #16
ThumperStorm
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Maybe this - "Warn® Industries has come up with a great solution for adventure riders seeking the most grueling of terrain, and another tool to make their solo rides more successful. With their new XT17 Portable Winch, mud bogs, deep sand areas, and swampy terrains become non-issues. (Of course it’s not just for solo rides, but also for those who’s companions aren’t a big help when pulling and pushing bikes out of mud!)

Weighing in at just 8.5 lbs., the XT17 can either be mounted to your motorcycle or stored in a sidecase, luggage bag, or wherever you see fit. Once needed, the winch quickly plugs into the included wiring harnesses (you would have previously installed) and operated by handlebar controls, uses it’s 1,700 lb. pulling capacity to get your motorcycle or ATV out of whatever situation you’re in. If the included 40 feet of synthetic rope isn’t enough, just add-on extra luggage straps you brought along after having learned how to pack for your adventure ride."
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:43 PM   #17
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Old trick I read for a winch anchor was a danforth type boat anchor. Once in the ground then the more you pull the better they dig in. It wouldn't take much of one, but whether there is one small enough or light enough for a motorcycle, I don't know.
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Old 01-14-2013, 07:15 PM   #18
Wallowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThumperStorm View Post
Maybe this - "Warn® Industries has come up with a great solution for adventure riders seeking the most grueling of terrain, and another tool to make their solo rides more successful. With their new XT17 Portable Winch, mud bogs, deep sand areas, and swampy terrains become non-issues. (Of course it’s not just for solo rides, but also for those who’s companions aren’t a big help when pulling and pushing bikes out of mud!)

Weighing in at just 8.5 lbs., the XT17 can either be mounted to your motorcycle or stored in a sidecase, luggage bag, or wherever you see fit. Once needed, the winch quickly plugs into the included wiring harnesses (you would have previously installed) and operated by handlebar controls, uses it’s 1,700 lb. pulling capacity to get your motorcycle or ATV out of whatever situation you’re in. If the included 40 feet of synthetic rope isn’t enough, just add-on extra luggage straps you brought along after having learned how to pack for your adventure ride."
I looked long and hard at this option. First I am a proponent of not adding any more weight to a GSA for off road use and secondly to load all added weight as low as possible to help the CG. The Warn winch at first blush is great, but it has a shortcoming that must be understood. You must have the motor running to use the winch, the battery alone will not sustain the winch and allow you to restart the motor....too much power pull on a battery if the motor is not charging it..wish I had a kick starter!

So for off road, bike down...I can't run the motor and must be able to stand the bike upright and start it before a winch could be used.

I called the Warn people and talked to the techs...they verified that the motor on a GSA would need to be running to power the winch.

Close but no.....
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Old 01-14-2013, 08:24 PM   #19
BeachMoto
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BestRest sells a motorcycle recovery system. I have no first hand experience with it but the concept is sound.

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Old 01-14-2013, 08:47 PM   #20
Wallowa
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Good Kit...

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Originally Posted by BeachMoto View Post
BestRest sells a motorcycle recover system. I have no first hand experience with it but the concept is sound.

This demonstrates why I carry two double pulleys...basically what is described on this video...but with double pulleys you gain even more mechanical advantage...

There was or is another kit out like this one in video, can't remember the name.

Advantages are light weight and can be used solo....still, like the person in the mud above; you need an anchor close enough and stout enough to tie into.

Oh yes, at $179 I think that is very expensive...you can put it together for less.
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Old 01-14-2013, 09:01 PM   #21
rboett
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UAS View Post
Old trick I read for a winch anchor was a danforth type boat anchor. Once in the ground then the more you pull the better they dig in. It wouldn't take much of one, but whether there is one small enough or light enough for a motorcycle, I don't know.
used to have a Fortress Anchor on my boat, these knock down and stow nicely. never thought I'd need it on my bike.

they really dig in.

http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs...3#.UPTTdG8715I
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:01 PM   #22
JimVonBaden
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Took me an hour, and laying it down several times, to get it out. Branches and sticks. Helps with traction for me and the bike.

Jim

PS I avoid this by not taking unfamiliar dirt roads after a rain these days.
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:17 PM   #23
LaurelPerryOnLand
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Riding alone has it's consequences...NO HELP FROM FELLOW INMATES!

Even the 'bears' knew this:

If you go down in the woods today you better not go alone
It's lovely down in the woods today but safer to stay at home
For every bear that ever there was will gather there for certain
Because today's the day the Teddy Bears have their picnic.

Great memories...long ago.
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:18 PM   #24
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double pulleys and a LOT of 1/8" amsteel or Vectran line. Doesn't take up much space/weight and is very useful.
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Old 01-14-2013, 11:14 PM   #25
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Would some burlap and or a tarp have helped gain traction in your situation?

I like the pulley system idea.

I got stuck in some suction mud once. It held the bike upright with no kick stand or center stand. It was winter, mid 30s clear skies the sun was setting and I was in the middle of nowhere 100 miles from home.

I got off the bike accessed the situation and my first thought is this pig (R1200GSA) is heavy and I am screwed. I got behind it and tugged it back a few inches at a time until I was in harder mud. I rested, put my gear back on, avoided mud and high tailed it home.

I was torn between labeling it a successful Adventure or a dumb ass move.
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Old 01-15-2013, 01:47 AM   #26
RichBMW
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Just do what Ewan and Charley do, and take a support crew in a truck with you
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Old 01-15-2013, 01:56 AM   #27
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What methods are you using? The only two methods I'm accustomed to are lifting and pushing. I can understand pushing is traction-dependent, but lifting is not, except theory and real-world applications don't always mesh. That said, my limited knowledge might be more or less expansive than yours and "common sense" and "common knowledge" never really applies.

I can squat lift quite a bit of weight, but I've been blessed with strong legs. Because of that, I may not have pursued other avenues of lifting my GS.

Think of mechanical advantage. Can I use a lever or a pulley?
i can lift my r100gs quite easily.But i can assure you it is quite a different proposistion if the ground you are standing on is not flat AND is slippery.As you lift the bike up you push with your feet to get it from mostly horizontal to mostly vertical.If the ground is slippery you cant.
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:27 AM   #28
PeterW
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Not a GS, but yeah, similar problem with my bike.

Get some seatbelt webbing (ebay or car wreckers) and some large D-rings (ebay). Get the D-rings sewn into one the end of the webbing so it's like a helmet fastener.

Rolls up to about the size of a ciggy packet.

Unroll, thread one end through the frame or crash bars, adjust the length, slip the loop over one shoulder, cinch it up and stand using the loop of belt material and your leg strength to lift the bike, makes it a LOT easier. It can also be used to drag one end of the bike around though I've never needed to do that.

I have a slightly lighter bike than a GS, but it falls over further without the jugs sticking out the sides. Getting old, office job, so not particularly fit or strong and that makes it relatively easy to lift the bike solo.

Pete
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:00 AM   #29
tagesk
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Not mud, but the problem is similar: No grip.

I carry a 20 meter high-tensile rope. By attaching to a tree, and inserting a stick to twist, I can get enough
pull to help me drag the bike out of "tight spots". Ropes used by climbers is what I use; light weight, "soft" and
easy to work with when the fingers are cold, and very strong.

Yeah, yeah, I'm not proud of the judgement that landed me here, but that's the issue of another thread.

[TaSK]
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:02 AM   #30
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650GS stuck in river mud consistency of pudding. Past ankle deep no leverage to pick up the back out of the rut. Eventually got out by building a solid base from downed branched and logs.

My point is - does not matter what size bike it can still get stuck; getting there is the fun part, getting unstuck is rewarding.
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