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Old 01-14-2013, 01:56 PM   #16
everycredit
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If your problem is a second bike, get something that's rather inexpensive (compared to the GS), fun, and good looking. I'm looking to buy a Moto Guzzi V7. Although I can go around town just fine on the GS, I think the MG would be more fun and the thing is beautiful. My GS is uglier than shit.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:12 PM   #17
ryan0708 OP
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Originally Posted by everycredit View Post
If your problem is a second bike, get something that's rather inexpensive (compared to the GS), fun, and good looking. I'm looking to buy a Moto Guzzi V7. Although I can go around town just fine on the GS, I think the MG would be more fun and the thing is beautiful. My GS is uglier than shit.
Yeah GS is very ugly but it is nicely ugly.
Unfortunately there is no moto guzzi here. If I was in US, I would get ducati sport classic which we don't have either.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:20 PM   #18
everycredit
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Originally Posted by ryan0708 View Post
Yeah GS is very ugly but it is nicely ugly.
Unfortunately there is no moto guzzi here. If I was in US, I would get ducati sport classic which we don't have either.
Of course it's nicely ugly. It's as pretty as concrete, but functional as concrete as well. :)

I'm sad to hear there is no Moto Guzzi in Brasil. Perhaps this might be a good business opportunity to import and sell them? :)
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:32 PM   #19
lukeinlondon
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Hey Ryan, I myself would say have a scooter as a second 'bike' The ease of no clutch jumping on and off and being in cruise mode the whole time for me is alway enjoyable!
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:55 PM   #20
kellymac530
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Ryan,
I was probably harsh on Retro myself. I can not totally blame him for being doubtful. With a couple of hundred thousand members, there are alot of people that are full of bologna. Some come on here just to flame and brand bash.

You say you just moved to Brazil {Brasil there}, where did you move from?
I am gonna laugh if you say southern California....

Still +1 on some kind of scooter...they just scream MAN!!! Confidant man.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:39 PM   #21
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Ryan,
I was probably harsh on Retro myself. I can not totally blame him for being doubtful. With a couple of hundred thousand members, there are alot of people that are full of bologna. Some come on here just to flame and brand bash.

You say you just moved to Brazil {Brasil there}, where did you move from?
I am gonna laugh if you say southern California....

Still +1 on some kind of scooter...they just scream MAN!!! Confidant man.
I was born in South Korea. Lived in USA and Canada. Served in US Army based in Korea.
Went to Brazil 8 years ago as a staff of YWAM and met my wife.
And that is how I moved to Brazil two years ago.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:06 PM   #22
SR1
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I understand not being into dirt.

You are looking for a complimentary bike. I've tried a few. The only thing that really seems to compliment it properly is a dual sport with knobbies and an SM wheel set for twisties.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:17 PM   #23
JustKip
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Originally Posted by kellymac530 View Post
+1 on some kind of scooter...they just scream MAN!!! Confidant man.
Another vote for a scooter, as the GS does well in every other category.

For the city, small, light, and twist-n-go is the only place the GS is "lacking"
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Old 01-15-2013, 12:06 PM   #24
Geografo
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What part of Brazil?

Ryan,

What part of Brazil do you now live in? If in one of the larger cities (i.e., Sao Paulo, Rio, or Brasilia, or any of the other large coastal cities), I would get a scooter or one of the Honda 150s that everybody seems to ride down there. They should be cheap, especially if bought used. They are also more maneuverable in the traffic, and will take up less space while lane-splitting. If you live in one of the less populated regions on the Trans-Amazon highway system, you will probably want to go with the advice on a smaller dual-sport, since even commuting often involves long stretches of unpaved roads, or paved roads with car-sized potholes.

How do I know? I just came back from Porto Velho in the north, and took a rental car over BR 364 to Cacoal, and saw plenty of both types of bikes, as well as plenty of unpaved and/or unfinished or poorly-maintained roads (the previous mayor of PV was indicted for stealing about $120 million from the city, which probably explains a lot of it--he was the last in a long line of similarly ethically challenged public figures in the region). Personally, I would want something with a high ground clearance and rugged for those roads. I am thinking of getting a Yamaha 250 dual sport or something similar for getting around next time, unless I move there for an extended period as we hope to do in the near future. In the latter case, I might try to import the GS, although it appears that that might be rather costly, due to the 60% import tax they impose down there. Btw, what did your GS cost, in Reais, if you don't mind my asking?
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Current Rides: 2007 R1200 GS

Past Rides:

1972 Yamaha 60 Mini-Enduro
1971 Yamaha 125 Enduro
1974 Suzuki GT 750 "Water Buffalo"--like a true water buffalo, big and heavy, but deceptively fast
2006 Harley-Davidson XL 883 (traded-in on Corolla...)
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Old 01-15-2013, 12:19 PM   #25
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Welcome Ryan.

Terry
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Old 01-15-2013, 03:02 PM   #26
def
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Originally Posted by ryan0708 View Post
I don't have any problem with it.
I just have to wait for another month to get it back because stupid dealer registered my bike as a BMW X1 car by mistake. Documentation came out as a car and I can't have any insurance on it.
Wow....sell the BMW X1 and pocket the profits and buy anything you want.

Ciao
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Old 01-15-2013, 03:17 PM   #27
ryan0708 OP
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Originally Posted by Geografo View Post
Ryan,

What part of Brazil do you now live in? If in one of the larger cities (i.e., Sao Paulo, Rio, or Brasilia, or any of the other large coastal cities), I would get a scooter or one of the Honda 150s that everybody seems to ride down there. They should be cheap, especially if bought used. They are also more maneuverable in the traffic, and will take up less space while lane-splitting. If you live in one of the less populated regions on the Trans-Amazon highway system, you will probably want to go with the advice on a smaller dual-sport, since even commuting often involves long stretches of unpaved roads, or paved roads with car-sized potholes.

How do I know? I just came back from Porto Velho in the north, and took a rental car over BR 364 to Cacoal, and saw plenty of both types of bikes, as well as plenty of unpaved and/or unfinished or poorly-maintained roads (the previous mayor of PV was indicted for stealing about $120 million from the city, which probably explains a lot of it--he was the last in a long line of similarly ethically challenged public figures in the region). Personally, I would want something with a high ground clearance and rugged for those roads. I am thinking of getting a Yamaha 250 dual sport or something similar for getting around next time, unless I move there for an extended period as we hope to do in the near future. In the latter case, I might try to import the GS, although it appears that that might be rather costly, due to the 60% import tax they impose down there. Btw, what did your GS cost, in Reais, if you don't mind my asking?
Thanks for your advice.
I don't mind telling you the price. Be ready to be shocked.
R1200GS triple black premium package is 80,000 reais which is about 38,000 us dollar.
Now it has 5,000 reais discount, so it is about 36,000 us dollar.
It is twice as expensive as the price of USA.

And more sad thing is that people steal only cheap bikes. Those cheap scooters and 150 hondas are robbed all the time.
They steal cheap Japanese bikes because they are easy to sell. They steal and break into parts and sell parts to the market.

BMW, ducati and triumphs don't get robbed because of this.

FYI, vespa gtv300 and triumph t100 are 30,000 reais which is about 14,000 us dollar.
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Old 01-16-2013, 02:20 PM   #28
Geografo
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That's What I Thought.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan0708 View Post
Thanks for your advice.
I don't mind telling you the price. Be ready to be shocked.
R1200GS triple black premium package is 80,000 reais which is about 38,000 us dollar.
Now it has 5,000 reais discount, so it is about 36,000 us dollar.
It is twice as expensive as the price of USA.

And more sad thing is that people steal only cheap bikes. Those cheap scooters and 150 hondas are robbed all the time.
They steal cheap Japanese bikes because they are easy to sell. They steal and break into parts and sell parts to the market.

BMW, ducati and triumphs don't get robbed because of this.

FYI, vespa gtv300 and triumph t100 are 30,000 reais which is about 14,000 us dollar.
Yep, that is what I thought. My stepson, who works for the place we rented the car from, showed us a used R1200GS (don't remember what year) in Porto Velho that he said was for sale for around R$55,000-60,000, if I remember correctly. The high import taxes that they charge down there are unreal, and probably account for a large part of the mark up. I also believe you when you say that the cheaper small bikes are stolen more often, since they appear to be very popular. Every year we go down, PV's streets seem to have more of the smaller bikes on the road, mostly due to the high gas prices (R$2.95-2.98/liter for common gasoline as of last week), I am told.

I have always thought that, if someone had the capital, they could try to convince BMW (or any of the other major motorcycle manufacturers) and the Brazilian government that setting up an assembly plant in Brazil would be in the best interests of both--Brazil and other Latin American governments instituted the high import taxes as part of an "import substitution" strategy to help kick-start local industries back in the 50s, 60s and 70s. I also think that, if they are not making a similar product in Brazil, they should lower the taxes on particular products.

Does anybody know if any of the motorcycle manufacturers have assembly plants in Brazil? Fiat must, because their cars are much cheaper than other brands (R$25,000-41,000, or about $12,500-21,000 US), although I also understand that they are also of somewhat lower quality (our rental was a Fiat, and it had some issues, especially on those roads).
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Current Rides: 2007 R1200 GS

Past Rides:

1972 Yamaha 60 Mini-Enduro
1971 Yamaha 125 Enduro
1974 Suzuki GT 750 "Water Buffalo"--like a true water buffalo, big and heavy, but deceptively fast
2006 Harley-Davidson XL 883 (traded-in on Corolla...)
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Old 01-17-2013, 01:09 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Geografo View Post
Yep, that is what I thought. My stepson, who works for the place we rented the car from, showed us a used R1200GS (don't remember what year) in Porto Velho that he said was for sale for around R$55,000-60,000, if I remember correctly. The high import taxes that they charge down there are unreal, and probably account for a large part of the mark up. I also believe you when you say that the cheaper small bikes are stolen more often, since they appear to be very popular. Every year we go down, PV's streets seem to have more of the smaller bikes on the road, mostly due to the high gas prices (R$2.95-2.98/liter for common gasoline as of last week), I am told.

I have always thought that, if someone had the capital, they could try to convince BMW (or any of the other major motorcycle manufacturers) and the Brazilian government that setting up an assembly plant in Brazil would be in the best interests of both--Brazil and other Latin American governments instituted the high import taxes as part of an "import substitution" strategy to help kick-start local industries back in the 50s, 60s and 70s. I also think that, if they are not making a similar product in Brazil, they should lower the taxes on particular products.

Does anybody know if any of the motorcycle manufacturers have assembly plants in Brazil? Fiat must, because their cars are much cheaper than other brands (R$25,000-41,000, or about $12,500-21,000 US), although I also understand that they are also of somewhat lower quality (our rental was a Fiat, and it had some issues, especially on those roads).
Haha guess what!
Brazil already has assembly plants for most of motorcycle brands.
Bmw, ducati, triumph, mv agusta, honda, suzuki, yamaha, harley davidson, sym and so on...
Premium models such as bmw' 1200 and ducati's super bikes are still 100% imported but many of other bikes and even cars are ressembled here. But the price is still crazy.
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Old 01-17-2013, 01:36 AM   #30
fallingoff
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you like duc's
how much for a small monster
ie 696
lots of fun
cheers
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