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Old 01-16-2013, 02:56 PM   #14146
2bold2getold
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spina View Post
Hi guys! Second post for me! I got a 1992 transalp at the first of october, I waited to get my driver license to post, it would have been awkward if I didn't get it after having bought the bike!
Anyway, this afternoon I got the license, so I'm here! I only have to repair the famous CDI problem and maybe some problems with high gas consumption, and then I can return on the road!
I have to say, this is my first motorbike and vehicle ever, and first two wheels vehicle apart for a bicycle! I was a little scaried at first but now it feels great! I hope to do a lot of kms on it! : ) I'll post photos as soon as possible, see you on the forum!
Welcome Spina. The Transalp is a great bike. There is lots of help here. Get all of the training and advise that you can. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. Be careful, and ride safe.
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Old 01-16-2013, 03:24 PM   #14147
GSPD750
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spina View Post
Hi guys! Second post for me! I got a 1992 transalp at the first of october, I waited to get my driver license to post, it would have been awkward if I didn't get it after having bought the bike!
Anyway, this afternoon I got the license, so I'm here! I only have to repair the famous CDI problem and maybe some problems with high gas consumption, and then I can return on the road!
I have to say, this is my first motorbike and vehicle ever, and first two wheels vehicle apart for a bicycle! I was a little scaried at first but now it feels great! I hope to do a lot of kms on it! : ) I'll post photos as soon as possible, see you on the forum!
I read excitement and youth in your post meaning good times ahead. Ride safe and far....and we await your pic
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:19 AM   #14148
Dr E
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Always cool to read in words someone experiencing the period in their life when a motorcycle is a new freedom. As you go out and begin to find out about the world that exists off the asphalt make sure that you are prepared. I don't just mean with gear, tools, and back up items to get you out of a jam...but make sure you take a camera for pictures that you will have for a life time; a video camera if you are wanting to capture a trail ride that is breath taking; a notebook if you like writing as there is nothing better than capturing the feelings as you are in the moment and a friend or two. Nothing better than after a day of riding then sitting around eating and laughing about the things you just did.

When you do get a moment, post up some pictures of your bike as it would be cool to see what you have!
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:16 AM   #14149
Ladder106
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Hiya Spina

Welcome to motorcycling.

You will likely get a fair bit of advice from most of the grey-beards here...listen to that.

But we all secretly envy you since we all remember what this felt like when we were doing it a few (or more) decades ago.

So here is some advice:

For yourself.....swallow some of that youthful pride and find at least two training courses.

One for street/road riding

The other for trail,dirt and off-road riding.

These two courses will pay for themselves very quickly since they will allow you to learn in a few days what would normally take a few months of falling off and bending stuff to learn if you do it the "hard way".


You might also consider finding a local riding club that does off-road riding, joining with others with more experience will save you time and money.



For the bike:

If there are no crashbars fitted. Get some and put them on.

Install "barkbusters" or some form of handlbar/lever protection.

There is not "if" about falling off....just "when". If you are just starting to ride off-road, you will fall. The crashbars will pay for themselves in saving the Transalp's expensive plastic and the bar-ends will save bent and broken levers and allow you to pick the bike up and continue riding rather than pushing it home with a broken clutch lever.

On the mechanical side:

Look for cracked and leaking fuel lines first.

If the fuel lines are OK...make certain the "choke" cable is not sticking and that the two choke plungers are moving freely in the carburators.

Be CAREFUL when removing the choke plungers from the carbs. The plack plastic hex nuts are SOFT and easily rounded off if you are not careful. They are also placed in an area that is difficult got get a wrench into.

Keep us posted on how you're doing
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Old 01-17-2013, 11:59 AM   #14150
Spina
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Location: Milano, Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSPD750 View Post
I read excitement and youth in your post meaning good times ahead. Ride safe and far....and we await your pic
You're right for both excitement, as I watched bikes out of the car windows since I was little, and for youth, as I'm 22-23 years old!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr E View Post
Always cool to read in words someone experiencing the period in their life when a motorcycle is a new freedom. As you go out and begin to find out about the world that exists off the asphalt make sure that you are prepared. I don't just mean with gear, tools, and back up items to get you out of a jam...but make sure you take a camera for pictures that you will have for a life time; a video camera if you are wanting to capture a trail ride that is breath taking; a notebook if you like writing as there is nothing better than capturing the feelings as you are in the moment and a friend or two. Nothing better than after a day of riding then sitting around eating and laughing about the things you just did.

When you do get a moment, post up some pictures of your bike as it would be cool to see what you have!
I really like photography even if I have a lot to learn about it, I will sure bring my reflex with me on my future road trips!
Here are the photos. Unfortunately one of the two ex owners dropped the bike, so the fairing was a little damaged. I have repaired it with some bi-component, but aesthetically it's still ruined, maybe in the future I will repaint it! The fall also damaged the radiator fan, it was stucked so I had a little overheating problem in the traffic, now it's ok!

60.000kms, 1500 euros, included transfer of property. And, as I bought it from a Triumph dealer, I have 1 year of warranty, I called them today to pick it up because it runs on 1 cylinder ( as I said, CDI problem :\ ) and I hope they will fix it under warranty, and soon! : D
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Hiya Spina

Welcome to motorcycling.

You will likely get a fair bit of advice from most of the grey-beards here...listen to that.

But we all secretly envy you since we all remember what this felt like when we were doing it a few (or more) decades ago.

So here is some advice:

For yourself.....swallow some of that youthful pride and find at least two training courses.

One for street/road riding

The other for trail,dirt and off-road riding.

These two courses will pay for themselves very quickly since they will allow you to learn in a few days what would normally take a few months of falling off and bending stuff to learn if you do it the "hard way".


You might also consider finding a local riding club that does off-road riding, joining with others with more experience will save you time and money.



For the bike:

If there are no crashbars fitted. Get some and put them on.

Install "barkbusters" or some form of handlbar/lever protection.

There is not "if" about falling off....just "when". If you are just starting to ride off-road, you will fall. The crashbars will pay for themselves in saving the Transalp's expensive plastic and the bar-ends will save bent and broken levers and allow you to pick the bike up and continue riding rather than pushing it home with a broken clutch lever.

On the mechanical side:

Look for cracked and leaking fuel lines first.

If the fuel lines are OK...make certain the "choke" cable is not sticking and that the two choke plungers are moving freely in the carburators.

Be CAREFUL when removing the choke plungers from the carbs. The plack plastic hex nuts are SOFT and easily rounded off if you are not careful. They are also placed in an area that is difficult got get a wrench into.

Keep us posted on how you're doing
Crash Bars are already on the plan. For the moment I haven't money, but I hope to find some job during the summer and buy something! For the levers I have the standard handguards for the moment.
I haven't the skills to check for carburators o mechanical problems, I hope the dealer will help me; for fuel problems I asked to check for the air filter. As soon as I have the bike back I will see if the consumption will get better, maybe the low mileage was due to the overheating, will see :\

For the courses: it's not a problem of pride, trust me! I have no problem to admit that I have a lot to understand and learn before saying to myself that I have learned how to drive, and I think that even at the moment I will always have something to learn. In the future I think I will search for some courses here near Milan! For the moment I plan to ride with my motorciclyst friends, even if they have on road bikes. I'm thinking to go offroad to, but it's a plan for the future; I know about some groups of transalp entusiast here in Italy, I will check on them!


Anyway:
thanks for the welcome guys! I will listen to every advice possible, as I said i have a lot to learn!

PS: As I said in the first post, english is not my mother tongue and I would really like to improve it, so every correction is really appreciated, even from the grammar nazis! : P

Spina screwed with this post 01-17-2013 at 11:16 PM
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:08 PM   #14151
Dr E
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Update on my build...

Well it has been over a month since I started into the project so I figured it was time to at least update where I am on the build. After getting the bike into the studio I started pulling off the parts and breaking her down to the motor and frame. Having never worked on a Honda before, I decided to divide the bike into systems and focus on each system, one at a time until it was complete and then move onto the next. My goal is to go through the bike and at the end, have a next to new a bike as possible thereby trusting it to do well in the field, it costs a bit more on the front end, but I prefer to rebuild now rather than when it’s not so convenient.


With the bike stripped, the first thing up was cleaning the frame up, which I was surprised was relatively clean for as old as it is. The worst area was a bit of spilled batter acid at some point which had eaten the paint away. With the frame clean I was able to paint the frame using Rust-Oleum Aluminum 7515 which (Showkey) had pointed out earlier in this thread is a perfect match. Boy he wasn’t kidding, this stuff went on like butter and when cured is some of the most durable paint I have ever worked with.



I was then able to cleaned out the stem mount and pulled/drove the bearing races out which had thoroughly rusted in place. Of all the components that I have come across, these bearings had fully failed. Once out, I installed the new bearing race for the XR650 front end that I will be mounting which I got from (Ladder106). Stem clean and the races in place, the triple tree was a snap followed by the front forks. Talk about difference in height, she is going to sit very nicely for me.



With the front end installed, it was time to work on the swing arm. After sanding it down and cleaning chips and other debris, I pulled the sleeves out and checked the needle bearings…dang those things can get away from you in a hurry if you’re not careful. Well, they were in good shape so after cleaning, they were filled with new grease and the sleeves installed.



Next it was time for the rear shock. I got lucky and found a good condition XR250 shock on EBay for $25.00 shipped and a rebuild kit for $20.00. In talking with a friend at work, turns out there is a former KTM race mechanic who opened a shop a mile from my home and is looking for business on all dirt/dual sport bikes. He got tired of doing the whole factory race scene and wanted to come home and do what he loved in a more quite pace and be with his family. After meeting him and his wonderful Australian Shepherd Sandy (I am a sucker for that breed having raised them for 30 years) I felt comfortable in bringing him some work. For $60.00 Tom rebuilt the shock, charged with nitrogen and for an additional $60.00 he installed a new heavier spring that came in at 11.5kgm in load. Right on the mark for what I was looking for and he did it in a day for me.



Got the shock home and got it installed nicely. I can see why the XR250 shock modification is the way to go, perfect fitment and matched ride height to the 650 front end as well as having a remote reservoir and dampening adjuster, this will work out great for modifying the ride based on loading.



Without going into gory details about the other components, as there are plenty of detailed writings on those I will simply list what else I have done as of today:


Wheel bearings on both wheels, XR650 bearings on the front wheel
New XR650 speedo mechanism and speedo cable
New rear break shoes
Modefied rear drum from push operation to pull
New 50” front brake braided steel line
New water pump
New thermostat (original was still in and eroded to just the spring
Rebuilt clutch pack (you really have to watch how the judder spring is placed!
All new cooling hoses
New foot pegs
Reupholstered Corbin seat
Welded PIAA light bar onto Givi crash bar
Used the Ladder106 engine mount upgrade to grade 8 bolts
New 16 tooth sprocket
IMS foot front foot pegs installed
Cleaned instrument cluster and modified light bulb shroud to improve gauge illumination
Completed Ladder106’s fuel gauge modification (all that’s left is to install)
Replaced both CDI units
Replaced starter solenoid
Air box modification
New tires and tubes and I was able to cleanly fit a 150 tire without issue
Painting of various pieces parts

I still have quite a bit to go, but this is where I am at as of tonight. Given the current pace I am going I am hoping to have this wrapped up maybe by mid February. I promise I will post some pictures of progress as I know a wall of words does not do justice to anything.

Take care,

Eric
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:14 PM   #14152
klausdorth
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So, a welcome from Japan, too!!

You definitely found the forum for our TAs ....
... and the experts come with it .... for free!!!

If you have any questions, just sit down and ask.
I am sure the answers will come!!
Concerning your bike - you made a good choice!!

Again, welcome on board of Adventure Riders!!!
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:00 PM   #14153
Ladder106
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Eric

PHOTOS



.............please
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Old 01-18-2013, 01:54 AM   #14154
Kromedome
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I think this is what you are talking about. PM me and I will give details........[/QUOTE]

What size wheels did you go for?
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Old 01-18-2013, 07:07 AM   #14155
cnf
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Hey guys

I'm looking into getting a 2nd set of wheels for my transalp

it's from 1993, would these fit? http://www.2dehands.be/motoren/acces...105252202.html

Or if anyone know where I can get an affordable set in Belgium, please do let me know :P
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Old 01-18-2013, 07:44 AM   #14156
Ladder106
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Difficult to be certain from the photos.....but likely they would NOT.

Playing with different wheels on my bike taught me that the TA uses a rather "unusual" size for the front disc. It's larger than those for most off-road bikes but small than those for most street bikes.

It's important to have the new wheel match the disc size/diameter and also very important to be aware of the spacing of the disc from the centerline between the fork legs.

It's not impossible but you will most likely spend some money finding a machinist to build adapter blocks for the disc calipers and possibly changing the wheel bearings (the TA uses a fairly small diameter front axle). Then that would defeat the concept of quickly changing between the two wheels.

I'd advise physically trying to fit them into the actual bike rather than buying from a photo.

However, there should be quite a good supply of TA wheels in europe if you want a set of dirt wheels for a quick and painless change.
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Old 01-18-2013, 09:06 AM   #14157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Difficult to be certain from the photos.....but likely they would NOT.

Playing with different wheels on my bike taught me that the TA uses a rather "unusual" size for the front disc. It's larger than those for most off-road bikes but small than those for most street bikes.

It's important to have the new wheel match the disc size/diameter and also very important to be aware of the spacing of the disc from the centerline between the fork legs.

It's not impossible but you will most likely spend some money finding a machinist to build adapter blocks for the disc calipers and possibly changing the wheel bearings (the TA uses a fairly small diameter front axle). Then that would defeat the concept of quickly changing between the two wheels.
Not the idea :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
I'd advise physically trying to fit them into the actual bike rather than buying from a photo.
That is good advice...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
However, there should be quite a good supply of TA wheels in europe if you want a set of dirt wheels for a quick and painless change.
I thought so, but I can not find any so far :/
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Old 01-18-2013, 03:15 PM   #14158
Blackbert
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Location: Belgium, wrong side of the river
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cnf View Post
Hey guys

I'm looking into getting a 2nd set of wheels for my transalp

it's from 1993, would these fit? http://www.2dehands.be/motoren/acces...105252202.html

Or if anyone know where I can get an affordable set in Belgium, please do let me know :P
I do have a second set, including the rear sprocket carrier. No discs. They are not being used, PM me if you're interested.
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:03 PM   #14159
ferretface
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Location: Wellington, NZ
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Overland ready Transalp

Not sure if this will be of any interest for peeps on this thread, but we might be selling our UK registered Transalp at the end of our trip in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Anyone thinking of doing an overland trip through the Americas (but in reverse!) drop me a message.
(I can add it to the flea market with all the specs if there is enough interest).

Cheers
Dan

http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...red-sale-68403

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Old 01-19-2013, 01:56 PM   #14160
Belgian Waffles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferretface View Post
Not sure if this will be of any interest for peeps on this thread, but we might be selling our UK registered Transalp at the end of our trip in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Anyone thinking of doing an overland trip through the Americas (but in reverse!) drop me a message.
(I can add it to the flea market with all the specs if there is enough interest).

Cheers
Dan

Pretty! What kind of seat is that?
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