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Old 11-02-2011, 03:47 AM   #16
concours
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The fastest, easiest, lasting repair

is right here. I've used these for years, recently on a Honda tractor differential. Reusable and leak free. I have machine shop skills, love Heli-Coils and STILL choose these when I can. A brilliant design. First oversize solves most all problems. Can be shortened. http://www.dormanproducts.com/p-25749-090-174.aspx available at fine auto parts stores everywhere. Ask for Dorman P/N 090-174.
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Old 11-02-2011, 05:21 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concours View Post
is right here. I've used these for years, recently on a Honda tractor differential. Reusable and leak free. I have machine shop skills, love Heli-Coils and STILL choose these when I can. A brilliant design. First oversize solves most all problems. Can be shortened. http://www.dormanproducts.com/p-25749-090-174.aspx available at fine auto parts stores everywhere. Ask for Dorman P/N 090-174.
Yeah, they seem like an easy solution. I also stumbled across this: http://www.cgenterprises.com/drain_p...ize_repair.htm

I think I'd go with the piggy back.
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Old 11-02-2011, 05:34 PM   #18
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The piggy back style is what I was describing, whether homebuilt or bought as the kit.

I had forgotten about the straight oversize like concours posted in the link.

Either choice has merits. Most important issue will be not to exceed the "bury depth" of the original plug. If either style repair exceeds that depth, it should be simple enough to grind or mill off the offending mm without sacrificing the self-tapping characteristics.

I would be stuck in indecision for days trying to choose which way to go.

Oh yeah, the comments about punching something new in there square to the original threads to get sealing at the crush washer is true. The workaround on good quick and cheap fixes would be to set the threads in epoxy like JB Weld. And that would seem to limit the choice to the piggy back option for absolute certainty of a good seal.
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Old 11-02-2011, 05:56 PM   #19
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Plug in a plug didn't work out so well for me. The tap broke in the plug. So I just red loctitied it back in and now there is a definate weep from the tap. Shit. I wish i could just find a piggy back plug with the proper thread pitch and length. Oh well.
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Old 11-02-2011, 06:30 PM   #20
One Less Harley
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Big please don't do the JB Weld "fix" you want to do it once and do it right don't ya??? JB will be temporary at best!! I'd go next size bigger, or thread insert. Most likely the thread insert as this would allow the stock drain plug to be used.
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Old 11-02-2011, 06:35 PM   #21
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I'll say it again...
tap it to the F/D drain plug size, then grind down a F/D plug shorter .
I bet I've done it 30 times in my shop days (other peoples F up's)
NEVER had one leak!
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Old 11-02-2011, 07:06 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by trophymoto View Post
I'll say it again...
tap it to the F/D drain plug size, then grind down a F/D plug shorter .
I bet I've done it 30 times in my shop days (other peoples F up's)
NEVER had one leak!
My understanding is that I would need to take the FD apart in order to tap the threads. I do not have the knowledge to do that otherwise I would.
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Old 11-02-2011, 07:14 PM   #23
concours
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concours View Post
is right here. I've used these for years, recently on a Honda tractor differential. Reusable and leak free. I have machine shop skills, love Heli-Coils and STILL choose these when I can. A brilliant design. First oversize solves most all problems. Can be shortened. http://www.dormanproducts.com/p-25749-090-174.aspx available at fine auto parts stores everywhere. Ask for Dorman P/N 090-174.
$3 and 3 minutes. Dry, removable, reusable, looks orig, etc....
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Old 11-02-2011, 07:54 PM   #24
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You said the drive shaft drain plug, all you need to do is separate the drive shaft housing from the final drive. Easy to do. Once separated the drain plug is visible and no further dissassembly is needed. Look again at wireworker's post/picture.

Only thing is that you may have to remove some material from the 10 mm boxed end of a wrench to remove the four bolts attaching the FD tot he drive shaft housing.


For the FD (looky here) all you need to do is pop the inner cover off, that is only removing the perimeter bolts around the inner housing then using long 5x30mm bolt in two holes in the housing and tightening them to pop the housing loose.No further dissassembly to get rid of shavings.
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One Less Harley screwed with this post 11-02-2011 at 08:15 PM
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:09 PM   #25
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Hardwaregrrl, wondering what you ended up going with and how it's worked? Looks like I'm also going to be dealing with this issue... While getting my /5 gussied up for its first outing, I noticed the FD drain plug not tightening up and, sure enough, the threads are stripped.
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Old 01-21-2013, 05:00 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by brocktoon View Post
Hardwaregrrl, wondering what you ended up going with and how it's worked? Looks like I'm also going to be dealing with this issue... While getting my /5 gussied up for its first outing, I noticed the FD drain plug not tightening up and, sure enough, the threads are stripped.
I took it off and ran it out to Boxwerworks, and they walked me through the drill and tap, and then insert. Pretty boring....now wishing I had sent it to Wirewrk to have a little of his DNA in my bike.

Sorry it wasn't a more exciting fix.
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Old 07-23-2013, 06:54 PM   #27
benthic
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i'm kind of resurrecting an old one, but I found this thread to be pretty helpful as I had to fix a stripped shaft drain too.

I got one (actually 2 since i didn't understand how they worked) of the Dorman self-tapping oversize drain plugs. it mostly went alright, but i bent a part of the final drive (crap!). i did exactly what I was afraid of doing. the length of the oversize plug hit the FD and pushed it in. you can see it in the pictures. luckily it is not a problem any time soon. on the plus side I think it is sealing pretty good though.
in the pics, the large plug is a 14x1.5 which i bought first because i didn't understand that the oversize was built in. I thought I had to buy a larger size plug. the little one is an oversize 12x1.75 (which is not the correct plug of 12x1.5, but i figured it would work) that I used to tap the hole (i had to keep shortening the plug) and then cut down to the correct length.










thanks for the help all!
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