ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-20-2013, 07:57 PM   #73081
JagLite
Studly Adventurer
 
JagLite's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Oddometer: 931
Cool2

Quote:
Originally Posted by trailrider383 View Post
The $498 includes a new spring. If you get the shaft assembly only from Racetech it's $399.99 minus %15 = $339.99

http://www.racetech.com/page/title/S...t%20Assemblies

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...76&postcount=1
Yes, and if you noticed in my post, the Cogent shock shaft assembly without spring is only $295.
Still a better deal than $339.99.

I do not know what the differences are between the Raceteck and the Cogent assemblies are.
Since Cogent is an authorized Racetech shop, they would be able to explain the differences.
One big advantage is that Rick at Cogent rides a DR650 so he knows the bike well.

Either way you can't go wrong, they will both make a huge improvement over stock.
__________________
Attitude ~
The difference between
Ordeal and Adventure
James
JagLite is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:36 PM   #73082
neo1piv014
ADV in training
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Oddometer: 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by motolab View Post
Yes.It's good that some force is required to get the spacer all the way against the clip. This will help prevent the needle from spinning during operation, which otherwise causes needle wear (see the needle on the left here: www.moto-lab.com/gallery/view?itemid=306).Leave it out.Indeed.

Remind me though, how many miles are there on the carb, and have you already inspected the slide guide, emulsion tube, slide and float needle for wear/damage?

Regards,

Derek
As of today, there's 12,445 miles on the bike, and I'm assuming that the factory carb is the one on there. The PO had stated that he put a DJ kit on the bike, but the needle definitely wasn't a DJ needle. The plug for the mixture screw had been removed, and the airbox had been opened up, however, so something had been done to it. I didn't notice anything that immediately stuck out as being worn out compared to the pictures on the BST Bible thread, but I've also not seen any brand new ones in person either.

Assuming I get the spacer forced up to where the the clip is, I would raise the clip position to lean things out a bit, correct?
__________________
_________________________
Ride videos
'01 DR650
"The impossible often has a kind of integrity which the merely improbable lacks."
neo1piv014 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:40 PM   #73083
acesandeights
Asperger
 
acesandeights's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: So. Oregon
Oddometer: 3,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
...
I do not know what the differences are between the Raceteck and the Cogent assemblies are.
Since Cogent is an authorized Racetech shop, they would be able to explain the differences...
I just measured the Race Tech shock shaft assembly and it is larger in diameter than the stock shaft. I was told that before buying, but didn't know until I measured it myself. So, it's a larger, stronger shaft with more bearing surface. I don't know what other difference(s) there might be.
__________________
http://breakingbooks.wordpress.com
http://www.kenmarshallmetalworks.com/
I may not be Rainman, but I'm not stupid eighter. Like Bartek on a taco.

I'll die with this hammer in my hand.
acesandeights is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:49 PM   #73084
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper Dan View Post
Actually, I've got the exact same one and find it great. I saw it on special for $99 a few months back but nonetheless is still worth the $150. I can actually move the bike around whilst its jacked up, up have never had an issue of it toppling off. Great for turning the bike around!

Have fun.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrepower View Post
That looks shit hot exile730, now all you need is a Safari tank, some Wolfman racks, Wolfman Saddle bags and you will be ready for the Canning Stock Route in July....

Cheers Richo.
Swan View.
Thumper Dan and Richo ... waste of band width to quote back all the photos from the original post. We've all seen them ... no need to RE-POST them.
Might I suggest you go back and EDIT them out of your posts?
Bad internet manners. Leave the pics OFF on replies ... especially when they are 4- X Large ones.
Cheers!
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:54 PM   #73085
Mambo Dave
Backyard Adventurer
 
Mambo Dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
Oddometer: 4,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by canoli View Post
What are you using to flush/bleed the system and how long did it take? Local dealer wants $99 p/hr for service and I'm not about to get ripped off so I was going to try and do this myself.


Thanks,
Canoli
Like Jaglite just said... it's too easy for that if you know to just not let air get into the system.

The only tools I used were the vice grips to loosen the bleeder screw, and some old piece of clear tubing/hose I found to guide the dripping fluid down into a oil catch pan (and to keep the fluid off of the rotors).

The rear - bleeds itself. Unbolt the rear brake reservoir to have easy access, loosen the bleed screw until it's dripping out, and just keep adding fresh fluid in the resevior to make sure it doesn't get low enough to suck air in. Toward the end tighten up the bleed screw/bolt/nipple, then top off the fluid and replace the reservoir.

The front - it wouldn't all just gravity-drip out, so I would pump the brake lever with my left hand while loosening and tightening the nipple/bleeder with the right hand to push old fluid out (the brake lever pushed the fluid out, close the bleeder, pump the lever, loosen the bleeder, hold lever down, tighten the bleeder, repeat a bunch of times).

Really only took the minutes that Jaglite says it does.

I used blue loctite on the two front top reservoir screws as an anti-seize since I have had those screws seize on another bike of mine (and since I couldn't find my real anti-seize), and ... ooh yeah ... most imperative - blue loctite on the 10mm bolt that holds the rear reservoir on since it was way loose! It would have fallen out soon.

---

It takes probably 15 minutes, total, from gathering the tools to finishing it up. Pay me ... $50 and I'll do it for ya

That's damned near a 49.5% discount!

-----

for more of an idea of all my special bleeder tools, here is a shot of the rear while it was gravity-bleeding itself:



Here the vice grips that I used on the bleeder are gently holding the tubing down to keep the tubing's end from falling out of the catch-basin. I didn't want brake fluid on my walk way.
__________________
"After reading through this thread I've come to the conclusion
that more people cruise the internet looking for reasons why
X bike won't work in Y scenario rather than actually riding
their motorcycles
." --
RyanR

Mambo Dave screwed with this post 01-20-2013 at 09:02 PM
Mambo Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 08:59 PM   #73086
Adv Grifter
on the road o'dreams
 
Adv Grifter's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
Oddometer: 6,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob.G View Post
New question... how do you guys go about deburring these holes? I got 'em all drilled, but now they have sharp edges, which the instructions say are a no-no.

I have a Dremel... suppose I could use that.

Rob
I used a Rat tail file and emery cloth. It takes a while. Make sure you clean all metal debris out. Rinse out well.
Adv Grifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 09:15 PM   #73087
motolab
Beastly Adventurer
 
motolab's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Oddometer: 2,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by neo1piv014 View Post
As of today, there's 12,445 miles on the bike, and I'm assuming that the factory carb is the one on there.
I would definitely recommend verifying that the depth of the indentations concentric with the bore in the bottom corners adjacent to where the slide bottoms are still at least .010" deep. If they are not, the emulsion tube is at risk for wear, which will cause an excessively rich mixture at low to low mid rpm.
Quote:
The PO had stated that he put a DJ kit on the bike, but the needle definitely wasn't a DJ needle.
Has the slide lift hole area been increased by drilling? If so, slide guide, slide and emulsion tube wear will have accelerated as a result.
Quote:
I didn't notice anything that immediately stuck out as being worn out compared to the pictures on the BST Bible thread, but I've also not seen any brand new ones in person either.
Measuring the the indentations concentric with the bore in the bottom corners adjacent to where the slide bottoms is key.
Quote:
Assuming I get the spacer forced up to where the the clip is, I would raise the clip position to lean things out a bit, correct?
After having verified good slide guide and therefore emulsion tube condition, float needle condition, correct float height, and correct main jet size, yes.

Regards,

Derek
motolab is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 09:34 PM   #73088
trailrider383
867-5309
 
trailrider383's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: NP, ID
Oddometer: 3,010
Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
Yes, and if you noticed in my post, the Cogent shock shaft assembly without spring is only $295.
Still a better deal than $339.99.

I do not know what the differences are between the Raceteck and the Cogent assemblies are.
Since Cogent is an authorized Racetech shop, they would be able to explain the differences.
One big advantage is that Rick at Cogent rides a DR650 so he knows the bike well.

Either way you can't go wrong, they will both make a huge improvement over stock.
I think one difference is the Racetech assembly has their Gold Valve.
__________________
DO WHAT YOU LIKE - LIKE WHAT YOU DO
Explain to me again why enjoying life when I retire is more important than enjoying life now?
trailrider383 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 09:47 PM   #73089
canoli
human
 
canoli's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Not from round these parts.
Oddometer: 1,490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo Dave View Post
Like Jaglite just said... it's too easy for that if you know to just not let air get into the system.

The only tools I used were the vice grips to loosen the bleeder screw, and some old piece of clear tubing/hose I found to guide the dripping fluid down into a oil catch pan (and to keep the fluid off of the rotors).

The rear - bleeds itself. Unbolt the rear brake reservoir to have easy access, loosen the bleed screw until it's dripping out, and just keep adding fresh fluid in the resevior to make sure it doesn't get low enough to suck air in. Toward the end tighten up the bleed screw/bolt/nipple, then top off the fluid and replace the reservoir.

The front - it wouldn't all just gravity-drip out, so I would pump the brake lever with my left hand while loosening and tightening the nipple/bleeder with the right hand to push old fluid out (the brake lever pushed the fluid out, close the bleeder, pump the lever, loosen the bleeder, hold lever down, tighten the bleeder, repeat a bunch of times).

Really only took the minutes that Jaglite says it does.

I used blue loctite on the two front top reservoir screws as an anti-seize since I have had those screws seize on another bike of mine (and since I couldn't find my real anti-seize), and ... ooh yeah ... most imperative - blue loctite on the 10mm bolt that holds the rear reservoir on since it was way loose! It would have fallen out soon.

---

It takes probably 15 minutes, total, from gathering the tools to finishing it up. Pay me ... $50 and I'll do it for ya

That's damned near a 49.5% discount!

-----

for more of an idea of all my special bleeder tools, here is a shot of the rear while it was gravity-bleeding itself:



Here the vice grips that I used on the bleeder are gently holding the tubing down to keep the tubing's end from falling out of the catch-basin. I didn't want brake fluid on my walk way.
Awesome! Thanks Dave and Jaglite. I'll take care of it this weekend.

Canoli
canoli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2013, 10:22 PM   #73090
Thumper Dan
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Australia, Northern NSW
Oddometer: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
Thumper Dan and Richo ... waste of band width to quote back all the photos from the original post. We've all seen them ... no need to RE-POST them.
Might I suggest you go back and EDIT them out of your posts?
Bad internet manners. Leave the pics OFF on replies ... especially when they are 4- X Large ones.
Cheers!
Well actually, I've seen it more times than not on this forum so didn't bother! Its not really bad Internet manners per se, just more an inconvenience. As such, I've edited.
__________________
Currently riding DR650 (2011)
Mods: Manrack, ebay 48 litre top box, grind header pipe; B&B bash plate; bigger/better tool compartment (pvc pipe) - Screens For Bikes Windscreen, TM40 Pumper Carb, Safari Tank, Seat Concepts, Oxford Heater Grips, Highway Pegs, Wolfman Expidition bags and racks, HDB handguards, Cogent Mojave rear shock, intiminators, GSX muffler/mod
Thumper Dan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 12:15 AM   #73091
Chill
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Chill's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: QLD Australia
Oddometer: 186
Clarke Gas tank cap

Does anyone know if there is an issue with the Clarke gas tank caps? Mine's only 4 months old but is cracking across the top through the logo. I did a google search and there seems to be a few letting go but none in the same way mine is. I'm sure they're a good company and I could get a replacement if I hassled them but probably will have the same problem again in a few months time. I'd rather fix the problem once and for all. Are these caps a generic fit? Will any aftermarket MX type cap fit or are they brand specific?
Chill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 05:58 AM   #73092
tbrduc
n00b
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Oddometer: 1
Old DR?

Hello,
it seems that this thread is about 'newer' DR's.
Mine is a '92 and as you know, different in many ways.
I tried searching for older models but the search engine here wasn't helpful
Where can I find data here on the older models?
It's basically stock, except for a JE piston, tires and airbox-jet modes from Uncle Jesse.

thanks.
tbrduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 06:02 AM   #73093
Emmbeedee
Procrastinators
 
Emmbeedee's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Near Ottawa, ON, Canada
Oddometer: 8,706
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbrduc View Post
Hello,
it seems that this thread is about 'newer' DR's.
Mine is a '92 and as you know, different in many ways.
I tried searching for older models but the search engine here wasn't helpful
Where can I find data here on the older models?
It's basically stock, except for a JE piston, tires and airbox-jet modes from Uncle Jesse.

thanks.
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=61568
__________________
Want to know more about the Garmin Montana? See the Wisdom and FAQ Thread.
Want to know more about the Garmin VIRB? See here.
"The motorcycle, being poorly designed for both flight and marine operation, sustained significant external and internal damage," police noted.
Emmbeedee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 06:19 AM   #73094
mrprez
KJ4WMZ
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Mobile, Al
Oddometer: 1,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by acesandeights View Post
Yes, it's stiff in fact, but doesn't feel like it's riding on the spring. That's how it felt in stock form like it was riding solely on the spring.

I rode again today and went over a little dirt jump the kids around the neighborhood use on their bicycles. I didn't jump it due to all the mud, just up and over a few times as if it were "whoops". My bike follows the terrain really well. Both tires stay planted to the ground. I know what you mean by the pogo because that's what my stock suspension felt like, but a really soft pogo stick. Now it's a stiffly, firmly planted, completely connected to the ground feeling. I'm still not sure whether it's a little too stiff, but I'm almost thinking riding for the last 18+ months with the stock suspension has made me forget what a good set up should feel like. Mine feels like the compression is stiff and the rebound just sticks the bike to the ground...no pogo. Hope that helps. BTW, when are the tires coming again!?
I just checked the sag, it is more than it should be so I'll add in some more preload and see what gives give. I'd like to get this to ride somewhat like my DRZ did.

Tires? Probably sooner than you'd think!!!

How's the coffee?

John
__________________
Sent via morse code
..-. -.-- ..-. ..-.
mrprez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2013, 07:57 AM   #73095
acesandeights
Asperger
 
acesandeights's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: So. Oregon
Oddometer: 3,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrprez View Post
...
How's the coffee?

John
Gone
__________________
http://breakingbooks.wordpress.com
http://www.kenmarshallmetalworks.com/
I may not be Rainman, but I'm not stupid eighter. Like Bartek on a taco.

I'll die with this hammer in my hand.
acesandeights is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014