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Old 01-24-2013, 08:05 AM   #3271
JAFO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
Question for the oxy-acetylene folks: How often should I be taking my torch in to have the o-rings serviced/replaced? Its a Victor set and is only used sporadically for home/hobby use for cutting and heating.

TIA
Why would you take them in? Buy replacement orings of the proper sort and do them yourself. It's not rocket science

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Old 01-24-2013, 09:19 AM   #3272
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
Question for the oxy-acetylene folks: How often should I be taking my torch in to have the o-rings serviced/replaced? Its a Victor set and is only used sporadically for home/hobby use for cutting and heating.

TIA
I have a set from the 1960s, rarely used, and it still has the original o-rings.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:30 AM   #3273
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Thanks all. I guess they will last a good long while. I had read somewhere on the usegroup/newsgroup I hung out on to self-teach myself welding & cutting that it was a prudent thing to do. And I am a little paranoid about OA after some of the stories posted by pros on that group.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:13 AM   #3274
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
Thanks all. I guess they will last a good long while. I had read somewhere on the usegroup/newsgroup I hung out on to self-teach myself welding & cutting that it was a prudent thing to do. And I am a little paranoid about OA after some of the stories posted by pros on that group.
I can certainly understand your cocerns- look back a few pages and you will see that I had same concerns myself a few back.

Replacement of the rings is not a bad idea as if they are bad you can get a flashback through the torch body. But other than the rings there isn't much else involved in a torch. Get the proper orings and install them yourself. Honestly it is easy. Not to be blunt, but if you can't handle replacing few orings you are probably gonna want to leave the oxy-fuel torch alone. ;-)
Oh yeah- install flashback arrestors, at least at the regulator.

I started with o-a a few months ago, bought a training dvd at Northern Tool for 30 bones.. VERY helpful and I recommend this highly!

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Old 01-24-2013, 02:16 PM   #3275
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So I'm about to make some new stronger pannier rails & a rear rack for the 640, will use 5/8 4130 tubing. First thing will be to machine up some mounting bushes from solid bar.

Now, I'm probably overthinking this but... the local steel store has 4140 I could use (& the few scraps needed won't cost much), or I have some plain mild steel on hand. Am I likely to get an appreciably stronger joint with the 4140 to 4130 (will TIG weld & post heat treat with the MAP torch if required) or is there not much in it?

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Old 01-26-2013, 11:45 PM   #3276
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I have searched Lincoln site and googled but cannot locate a wiring diagram for a Lincoln Weldanpower 300+ engine driven welder using a Kubota engine. Code is 1316. Model is WP300+. Made in Australia by the looks of it. Any leads appreciated
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:35 AM   #3277
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilbara View Post
I have searched Lincoln site and googled but cannot locate a wiring diagram for a Lincoln Weldanpower 300+ engine driven welder using a Kubota engine. Code is 1316. Model is WP300+. Made in Australia by the looks of it. Any leads appreciated
Cheers
Pilbara
This is for your code # kabota engine pipeliner 200.

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/asset...oln3/im844.pdf

not sure if this is it, code #s have 5 digits.

David
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:16 AM   #3278
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Which welder 4 Lock Box onto Shipping container

I have some shipping containers used for storage and need to weld on some steel lock boxes to protect the padlocks from everything but cutter grinders.

There is a single phase power supply 240vac up to 13amps available. I would like to consider purchasing my own welder to weld these boxes onto the containers as the cost of getting a contractor to do it would mean if I do it myself, I'll save and get to keep the welder for other jobs.

What welder would be suitable for this job?
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Old 01-27-2013, 07:51 AM   #3279
David R
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlandr View Post
I have some shipping containers used for storage and need to weld on some steel lock boxes to protect the padlocks from everything but cutter grinders.

There is a single phase power supply 240vac up to 13amps available. I would like to consider purchasing my own welder to weld these boxes onto the containers as the cost of getting a contractor to do it would mean if I do it myself, I'll save and get to keep the welder for other jobs.

What welder would be suitable for this job?
How thick is the steel?

Do the math, 13 amps @ 220 volts = 2860 watts

Stick Welding at 35 volts, you will have 81 amps not counting 25% loss in efficiency.

I weld 3/32 7018 at 85 amps DC. Not quite enough there.

Mig welding at 18.6 volts you have 150 amps available using c/25. still not counting loss.

Does this help?
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:58 PM   #3280
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I am going to have to offer my non-professional opinion, born of experience here:

A 120vac MIG is more than up to the job for welding lock boxes to connex-container steel doors.

I built three jeeps I have beat the hell out of with my Lincoln 3200HD, welding from 1/16" high-tensile steel sheet (jeep Cherokee monocoque) to 1/4" structural sub frames and OEM chassis (S10 solid axle swap, bumpers and axle bracketry). I have had no problems at all using (flux core E71T-GS) and (ER70S-6 with CO2).

Metallurgically speaking, I am sure this is likely not optimum, but I have never had a problem with these builds and have winched many times without problems, several hard pulls.

Also, used a Lincoln AC225 for some parts of these builds, using 6013, but those welds are by far in the minority since I don't have ready access to 220vac.

Since the OP is new to this and just wants to get a task done and then play with/learn a skill, I would lean toward the stick machine and look for one used on craigslist. I paid $125 for my AC225. Recommend staying away from the Harbor Freight welders as they can be hit/miss.

Also, since presumably the OP doesn't have the ability to do these welds in flat position, I suspect the hardest part will be dealing with the out-of-position nature of this welding task. I think I would run them uphill to keep the slag out of the joint, and clean well with a grinder first. Probably not strictly necessary owing to the rod selected, but you can never clean a weldment too well before burning in.

My experience, and again I am not a professional welder but I have actually welded onto this material at work with the MIG mentioned above.

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Old 01-29-2013, 05:17 AM   #3281
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Hopefully, this will not be a really vague question. I am looking to weld/braze an aluminum fork 'tang' and am scoping out what is needed. The fork is for a BMW /7 motorcycle and the tang is part of the brakes. Specifically, the tang stops the pad from rotating with the disc as the brakes are applied. Here is pic of the lower tang:

The maximum thickness is ~ 3/8" near the fork and tapers to 3/16" furthest away. The project involves taking a left fork leg and converting it into a right fork leg, i.e. making a mirror image. This involves cutting the tang off the left fork inside (nearest the disc) and welding/brazing it to the left front outside (which becomes the right front inside).

My equipment is not heavy duty, I have a Hobart handler 140 with 0.030" 5356 aluminum wire and argon gas. This welder is rated for 1/8" thickness. I also have (and am willing to try) brazing with HTS-2000 type aluinum/zinc using a sheet metal 'mold' to hold the pre-heated and tinned fork and tang in place. I am not a very experienced welder, but have done a bit of oxy-acetylene and some MIg. I have done a lot of brazing.

My questions are:
1. If I file/grind and bevel the fork and tang so there is a 1/8" thickness at the tang and fork pieces, which then increase to ~ 3/8", can a root pass be done with my 140 amp welder with ~ 200 deg F preheat? Or, will this approach likely result in a big mess without considerable skill due to the extra thickness and fork acting as a heat sink?

2. Presuming I can get the 1/8" thick root pass weld to get the tang in place, will adding material (i.e. additional passes) work with that small of a welder? Again, preheat is planned and beads would be applied over the previous weld in a multi-pass approach.

My main concern is that the fork leg is a big heat sink and even with pre-heating will pull heat from the weld. I can arrange the fork and piece on a welding table, and can pre-heat with a Mapp gas or propane. I intend to practice on some 6061 aluminum but those will be small flat pieces and nothing like a fork tube. Any constructive criticisms are welcome - along with tips on locating and recognizing a good weld shop - although this project is not beyond motivating me to buy a 225 amp spoolgun machine.

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Old 01-29-2013, 09:27 AM   #3282
David R
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I am at lunch. IN a word no.

Your mig will not do it. You don't have near enough power.

I can elaborate more tonight.

I did my /6 by buying a set of sliders off a 900S from Eurotech in California for $400. I had to send my old stuff back.
It came with caliper, rotor master cylinder and lines all used but inspected and guaranteed to be in good condition. It was. That was in 1993. I am still riding the bike.

Enjoy your bike
David
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:06 AM   #3283
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Based on my interweb readings, the "you can't get there from here" response was expected using my small MIG. Note that I didn't say it was a good welding question. As such, I am refocusing on oxy-acetylene welding. Otherwise, there is a custom motorcycle shop I have a lead on to talk with about welding the upper tang.

I am confident that enough heat can be applied with an oxy-acetylene torch to melt the fork tang into a blob. The upper tang is critical, the lower not so much. The upper tang is also thicker than the lower, so the lower is my target. But, as a non-urgent and non-critical project I will take some time before attempting any welding and destroy the fork.

This gives me a good excuse for practicing gas welding aluminum. Back in the day, all sorts of aluminum castings and parts were gas welded with most of the books published before 1940. So, with some oxy-actetylene books (including one by Union Carbide from the '60's) and a few how-to DVD's, off I go!
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:24 PM   #3284
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Pretty sure you'll need hydrogen, not acetylene, to weld aluminum. No idea if you can get away with the acet instead though.
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Old 01-31-2013, 06:12 PM   #3285
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accet. isn't one of the cleanest burning fuel gasses, and just as soon as I say it probably won't work, somebody will come along and say "Oh ya we use accet. all the time to weld alum." but i've never seen alum welded with accet.
i've never heard of using hydrogen for a fuel gas.
propane does burn clean and i've seen it used in welding irrigation pipe in the field.
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