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Old 01-30-2013, 09:56 PM   #31
JagLite OP
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Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Anchorage Alaska
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Cool2 My machine shop

I have been asked to show the tools and machines I have been using on my project.

Here is my mill, lathe, saw, and other machines;

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.


.


.


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And my handy bench sanding machine:


.


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My 2 ton hydraulic crane for heavy lifting

.












I do also have a Miller 185 MIG welder that I am learning how to weld with and it was expensive since I bought everything new and got everything I could need to weld with. A friend got almost the same equipment on CList for under $300, which is less than a third of what I spent so deals are available some times.

I also have a wobbly bench drill press that was $80 brand new and not worth that.

Anyway, I wanted to show you don't have to have a fully equipped machine shop to do this.
Although all of us would love to have that fully equipped shop!
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Old 01-30-2013, 09:57 PM   #32
150ron
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Simply amazing, i cant wait to see this one come together even more, please keep the pics coming, that thing will be SICK once done, good job!!!
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:19 PM   #33
Dorzok
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DANG IT!!!
I need another build thread like i need another ride report.

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Old 01-30-2013, 10:28 PM   #34
JagLite OP
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Location: Anchorage Alaska
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Headlight-numberplate

I wanted the traditional class C front number plate with headlights mounted behind it.

I wanted stacked vertically small lights mounted off center with the lights shining through holes in the plate.
I don't need bright lights since it is not dark here when I ride.
I haven't ridden a bike after dark in 30 some years in fact.
Living in Alaska does present some unique circumstances.
So, I just need lights to have on as required by the law as a daytime headlight.

I bought two small 2" diameter clear fog lights (or driving lights depending on who is selling them).
And an aluminum class C numberplate 9"x11" I think it is.

I used the number 48 when I raced mx as a kid and more recently when competing in autocross so that was the number I wanted on my tracker. I printed out a "48" on paper and taped it on....



So far, so good...



I need something to hold the lights...





Some black paint...





Some aluminum angle for strength...







I decided I liked it better without the rock guard screen

And with the vinyl numbers I cut out and mounted on the bike;
Low beam


High beam


I may wire them so "high" beam is both lights.... eventually... maybe...
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Old 01-31-2013, 06:51 AM   #35
Bronco638
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Thanks for the replies. I suspected that would be your answer regarding the seat stays. I was actually thinking about Kydex frame guards but would prefer to have a bare frame (or frame section) with which to work. When are you going to tell us about the pipe build and why the header wrap?
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:49 AM   #36
JagLite OP
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Cry Mummy wrap

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronco638 View Post
Thanks for the replies. I suspected that would be your answer regarding the seat stays. I was actually thinking about Kydex frame guards but would prefer to have a bare frame (or frame section) with which to work. When are you going to tell us about the pipe build and why the header wrap?
I don't like header wrap.
I really don't like header wrap.
But my welding on the pipe is so ugly that I had to cover it up.
With header wrap.
I will be building a new pipe next winter...
My welding has improved so I hope the next one will be presentable.
I will have it ceramic coated.
The existing pipe is just temporary is my only excuse

What is Kydex?
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:41 PM   #37
JagLite OP
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Puke Pipe Dreams

Since you asked, I will show the reason why the header wrap is in use as mummy wrap.


However, these horrifying pictures are for mature eyes only.

Young and innocent eyes may weep, with the images forever burned in their minds, resulting in nightmares for the rest of their lives.

View at your own risk....


I ordered the mandrel bends and lengths of tube from Cone Engineering.
(If they read this they may pay me to not mention them)

I had an idea of how I wanted the pipe to run, to compliment the frame bends as best I could.

The beginning:



I wanted a tighter bend than the stock headpipe has coming out of the head so I sliced it multiple times on the inside of the curve but didn't cut all the way through the pipe. I left a short section uncut to act as a hinge and hold it all together.

I used the stock headpipe as it had the flange and it simplified my pipe build attempt.

Then I held pieces in place and marked them for cutting.
Cut, fit, grind if needed, fit, and when it looked OK, I marked the new piece and the existing piece with 3 strike up lines (just a line running along the pipe piece an inch or so on each side of the joint) so I could line up the pieces to tack weld them. I tacked each part, one at a time and then bolted it back on to fit the next part.







Once I had it all tacked together I welded it up.
Or, I should say I tried to weld it up.
Tack welding was not difficult but trying to weld around the pipe was terrible.
I couldn't see the weld at all so I would go for an inch or so, stop and look, and see that I had put down a bead beside the joint and going off away from the joint. I would grind that off and try again only to blow a hole in the pipe that I had to weld around to close up. Eventually after much frustration and asking for suggestions in person and online, I bought another welding helmet. Also auto darkening but a genuine name brand $150 helmet instead of my ebay $50 version.

Ta-DA!

No difference at all.
For my eyes anyway, my build budget felt the hit.

The real help was the suggestion to NOT look at the weld puddle directly but to look at the edge of it instead.
That does help some but I still couldn't see the joint I was trying to join together.
Quite frustrating actually.



I burned so many holes and had so many beads going off line I ended up just going around each joint with beads on top of beads to try to join it together and not end up with holes. About the end of my pipe welding adventure, I ran out of wire so I took the old roll out and put in a new one.... And discovered I had been using the WRONG wire size settings for speed and heat. Since I am new at welding i didn't know what it should act like, look like, smell like, and as far as making the "sizzling bacon" sound, I could get that OK but i was still burning holes.

I have discovered it is much easier to weld thicker metal than thin tubing and that welding around a tube is much more challenging than a straight or flat joint.

I will be making a new pipe to replace this monstrosity...

And finally, on the bike:

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Old 01-31-2013, 08:17 PM   #38
JagLite OP
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Location: Anchorage Alaska
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Cool2 Subframe and electrical tray

Some picture details of the electrical tray that is made of bent sheet aluminum.

the subframe:


















Installed:





There is a lot of wire in there that could be removed.
I didn't shorten any of the wires but if I do decide to do that it will really open up the visual density.







It all fits without trouble so operating on the wires to shorten them is not high on my list of things to do.

A high compression piston and a pumper carb would be really nice...
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:46 PM   #39
JagLite OP
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Cool2 Up to date...

i am leaving in the morning for three weeks so i will try to get this caught up to date tonight.
Details of some aspects may be added later.

So, I added LED turn signals front and rear as well as an LED tail light, all eBay items.
I added bar end mirrors but installed them on the bar inboard of the controls.
Sitting on the bike in the garage I can see easily behind me, how they work on the street remains to be seen.
(har-har-har!!! )











When I made the aluminum muffler hanger it also jumped out too much visually for my taste so it is also painted black...



And with he garage door open... the winter wonder land!
That means we all wonder why we are here in the winter.







Light 'em up!



Well, that's it for now. I do have some pictures of cutting and lowering the foot pegs, the tiny electronic (bicycle) speedometer, the tiny tachometer, and a few odd other things I have had fun with.
BTW, if you noticed the little speedo wire hanging along the fork leg, it is not hooked up yet so it is just dangling for the picture.

All I need is the finish paint job and clear coat as well as the decals and pin stripes.
That will be when I return...

Our local mc show is in March and I do want to enter it...
Hopefully at least a few people will like to see something besides the mechanical HD art bikes.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:07 PM   #40
kellymac530
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It is always hard to see exact angles and certain comfort shapes. I really like the look overall. My only concern would be if that seat is actually sloped as far forward as it looks in some of the shots it may not be too comfy for more than quick little jonts. I am not there to actually tell, so if it is good for you then awesome. I just never like that sliding or pushing forward feel.

If it does feel that way after a first real ride it may be a fairly easy fix just shortening the sub frame suppoots a bit...
As I said though, it looks really good. Now go get a trophy.


PS: How on earth do they have a bike show in March in Alaska? What are the March temps Anchorage? I like to ride to bike shows, not tow in an enclosed trailer..
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:03 AM   #41
Bronco638
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite
I don't like header wrap.
I really don't like header wrap.
But my welding on the pipe is so ugly that I had to cover it up.
With header wrap.
I will be building a new pipe next winter...
My welding has improved so I hope the next one will be presentable.
I will have it ceramic coated.
The existing pipe is just temporary is my only excuse

What is Kydex?
I don't like header wrap either. It holds dirt/moisture and concentrates the heat in the metal. I've seen too many headers fail due to rust and heat fatigue. But, I feel your (welding noob) pain. I'm in the same boat.

Kydex is a thermo-plastic that, when heated (properly), can be formed (free-hand or in a mold). It comes in various colors/patterns but the most popular is the one that mimics the look of carbon fiber. Here's a link with some general info: KYDEX.
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:26 PM   #42
ktmklx
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Don't feel to bad about the exhaust pipe welds, you really don't have the right tool to make pretty butt welds on tube. I have been hobby welding for 32 years, using a mig for the tubes would be my 3rd choice. A mig welder is great for most steel work, and if you are only going to have one welder for bike work, probably the one to have. For steel exhaust tube it is much easier (once you have it mastered) to make pretty welds with an oxygen/acetylene torch with welding tip. A tig welder would also be much easier (but more expensive) to create the pretty welds. Here are some tips that may help. Put autoshade at the lightest setting to make it easier to see. The problem with a mig is you can not control the heat on the fly like you can with gas or tig, when you start the weld you need much more heat than you do when you are a few seconds into the weld. Try pulse welding, as soon as you see the metal glowing really bright, just before burn through, let off the trigger for a split second, don't move the torch handle, hit the trigger again and continue your weld starting and stopping rapidly. By pulsing the trigger you can control burn through. If your mig does not have a trigger then obviously this won't help you. You did good by using what you had.


Fantastic job on the tank, very cool shape. It is obvious you know what you are doing with the glass.

Very nice bike, and great design.
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Old 02-10-2013, 08:55 PM   #43
schnutzy
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awesome build. gives me hope that i will be able to do something similar some day.
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Old 02-11-2013, 12:00 AM   #44
sonic reducer
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I really like your concepts and work on the subframe. you have a knack for putting a system together in a functional and appealing way. packaging things tightly and efficiently is rarely easy on a motorcycle and there are a lot of things that interfere with each other. I think you might have gone a bit too low on the suspension, time will tell I guess. I'm interested to hear how much it weighs.
good idea on hanging all the tracker pics on your wall to see while you work!
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Old 02-12-2013, 07:35 PM   #45
trailgnome
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re the pipe two things that might help : 1) use the smallest dia. wire and contact tips that your machine can use. Check volts amps and speed on actual pipe scraps. 2) if you're not already, try using a cheater lens inside your hood.it will give a clearer view of puddle edge and joint. Small diameter thin wall tube isn't easy to wrap around with a mig gun. Even with a tig you often do sections. Nice build, have fun
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