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Old 02-03-2013, 08:11 PM   #14236
Belgian Waffles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr E View Post

Here is a side view with the inverted brake set up (that was so easy even a caveman can do it)!
Advantage of the inverted brake setup? Just clearance for brush/rocks?
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:14 PM   #14237
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Originally Posted by Iron_Floyd View Post
Fairings repair:

Some plastic parts ware missing, left somewhere on the road, so I had to rebuilt it.
Beautiful fix Floyd! What kind of compound did you use to rebuild the plastics?? I think a lot of us here would be happy to get ahold of some of that...
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:18 PM   #14238
WeeBee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr E View Post

There was one significant issue in trying to do the valves, the center plug on the stator cover has seized itself into the housing to the point, that when I was trying to turn it with an allen wrench, a section of the plug fractured off in a metal chip. Nothing that made it fail, just a chip from the surface...so at some point I will be ordering a new one to replace this. Aluminum is so easy to gall in place its not surprising.
Eric

Have a look at this post I made regarding a fix for that problem. You'll have to email the guy to see if he's still making the product.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...postcount=7974
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:51 PM   #14239
Iron_Floyd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgian Waffles View Post
Beautiful fix Floyd! What kind of compound did you use to rebuild the plastics?? I think a lot of us here would be happy to get ahold of some of that...
Thank to all of you :)

I've used a fiberglass like this guy on youtube.

Great instructions there. Fiberglassing part starting on 2:50.
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Old 02-04-2013, 05:58 AM   #14240
Dr E
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCalTA View Post
Eric

Have a look at this post I made regarding a fix for that problem. You'll have to email the guy to see if he's still making the product.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...postcount=7974
I totally forgot about this little nugget and now remember at the time I read it and thought "???" now the grasshopper is wiser and understands this issue!

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Old 02-04-2013, 07:41 AM   #14241
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A bit of Anti-seize on the threads and just a bit of grease on the O-ring will keep this thing from welding itself to the case.

Also beware of Crafsman allen sockets. I've measure quite a few sets (to the odd glances of the salesman) with calipers and found them all to be a few tenths of a mm small. Snap-on ($$) is your friend here. The craftsman product will almost always round off a stubborn allen...particularly bad when it's as visible as this one.
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Old 02-04-2013, 10:55 AM   #14242
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
A bit of Anti-seize on the threads and just a bit of grease on the O-ring will keep this thing from welding itself to the case.

Also beware of Crafsman allen sockets. I've measure quite a few sets (to the odd glances of the salesman) with calipers and found them all to be a few tenths of a mm small. Snap-on ($$) is your friend here. The craftsman product will almost always round off a stubborn allen...particularly bad when it's as visible as this one.
Well, I just got through with emails to Frank and it turns out he has a distributor in San Francisco that will be sending them to me. A very nice turn of events and even nicer to get that sill stuck plug out of my case. I was not looking forward to always having to remove valve covers to make adjustments.
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:45 AM   #14243
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See that in the original position, you are pushing. In the inverted position, you are pulling. I dont know if there is any advantage, other than if you push hard, the brake rod might tend to bend and absorb the energy...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgian Waffles View Post
Advantage of the inverted brake setup? Just clearance for brush/rocks?
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:52 AM   #14244
locorider
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Another view


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Old 02-04-2013, 12:22 PM   #14245
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Good to know!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
A bit of Anti-seize on the threads and just a bit of grease on the O-ring will keep this thing from welding itself to the case.

Also beware of Crafsman allen sockets. I've measure quite a few sets (to the odd glances of the salesman) with calipers and found them all to be a few tenths of a mm small. Snap-on ($$) is your friend here. The craftsman product will almost always round off a stubborn allen...particularly bad when it's as visible as this one.
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Old 02-04-2013, 02:10 PM   #14246
Dr E
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Carlos, looking at the mechanism in close detail and how the cam applies force to the pads, either a push or pull fashion gives equal loading, as that is based on the fulcrum at the pedal. However I did notice that you had applied a rubber coating over the arm to prevent rubbing and banging on the swing arm as I can see that under a vertical or "bouncing load" you could hit the arm and damage the paint. I just bent mind a tad bit further out and if I hear any banging or see and damage I will coat mine as well. Here is a cool older modification I found of how a racer configured his bike. Seems this idea and worry about damaging the lever arm hanging down has been around for awhile.



I still liked how you did it and feel comfortable with using a reverse from the OEM configuration.

As I did not post up pictures above, here are two quick snaps taken this morning before work:



Now its like the jigsaw puzzle in making sure I get all the pieces back in the right order I took them off!

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Old 02-05-2013, 04:51 AM   #14247
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Originally Posted by NorCalTA View Post
I've spoken with Rick, the owner of Cogent Dynamics, by phone at length about his shocks. If I ever get another TA, I'll definitely be putting a Cogent rear shock on it. Lifetime warranty and made in the USA by a family-owned business of motosports enthusiasts is good enuf fo me .
Rick did do an excellent job on my T/A's forks so I'll stick with Cogent when I order out the shock. I plan on overhauling the rear suspension links at the same time.
Dudley
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Old 02-05-2013, 11:45 AM   #14248
locorider
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Originally Posted by Iron_Floyd View Post
Thank to all of you :)

I've used a fiberglass like this guy on youtube.

Great instructions there. Fiberglassing part starting on 2:50.
I use epoxy, like West System. Is harder than resin and fiberglass. I did the mods on my bike on 2008-2009 and everything is in place, no cracks. With their pump system, you dont have to measure. Down side: expensive.
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Old 02-05-2013, 12:23 PM   #14249
locorider
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Originally Posted by locorider View Post
Hi there! Newcomer here!
I don't know if someone had mentioned it, but the center stand shown in the thread (further down)looks much like my 1973 Honda CL350 stand. Vintage Hondas had two stands and this one looks pretty much like it. I'll measure it and get back to you all, so that someone checks it and see if it might fit!

I just bought a Transalp, with 14k miles 2 weeks ago and it is still in the mainland. I'll keep it for a year or two to do some riding and then bring it down.
My first post, August 29, 2006, Post 12445...and I've been enjoying it since!
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:03 PM   #14250
Santa
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The brake rod always pulls the lever on the hub forward.
There is no push. Go press the brake and see.

Mounting the lever on the hub above the swingarm gives clearance and a measure of protection from damage you might get say riding in a rut or splitting the gap betwen two rocks on a trail.

Unless you are using the TA in extreme off road conditions this is not needed.
I think the interference between the rod and swingarm causes more issues than if you just run it as stock in the low position, especially with long travel suspension.
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