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Old 05-01-2012, 06:14 PM   #91
lockyv7
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Location: Sunshine Coast Australia, There is no winter here.
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I rode home from Orange to Caloundra in one hit about a week ago, sun was setting by about Moree by Goondiwindi it was dark from there to Caloundra in the dark and i didnt see one roo the whole trip, not a live one anyway. But i know they were there watching me.
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:27 PM   #92
XRman
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Originally Posted by rvt View Post
Maybe I should fit an exhaust brake to the dr. That should get them hopping.:) I have had the electronic version on work vehicles. Pretty sure the roos didn't give a flying marsupial poop.


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Back in the 70's there was an exhaust valve tat was fitted to the second plug hole. You pulled the cable lever and it was supposed to give a 2 stroke bike engine braking. It really scared pedestrians!
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:17 PM   #93
boxerboy81
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If you buy a ShooRoo the best thing that one might say after using it for a while is "I haven't hit a 'roo since"

That doesn't mean it works to ShooRoos, as that's probably impossible to know.

Conversely, even if someone hit a 'roo with one installed, who's to say it hadn't worked once or twice in the past, when the rider didn't even see the animal?

Bottom line is that evidence is thin on the ground and for a reason. I figure the only harm in them is to be too reliant on them, and ignore all other strategies, like avoiding dawn & dusk & night riding, moderating speed and scanning for shapes and silhouettes. Even then, the buggers know how to knock out a front wheel in a yoctosecond.

Watch this short vid...see if you can see the blighter come out onto the road.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpcz1qcxYuA
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:27 PM   #94
JohnG.
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Location: Kyeamba, NSW at the foot of the snowies
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Mostly commute 2-4am in the morning,never see a thing with loud 'cans barking
take the car with shoo roos (prob blocked up) see wildlife everywhere
On Holidays we travel between 8-3pm & see lots of roadkill but no live ones.usually.
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:52 AM   #95
omeoxlv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony T View Post
I did a search, but didn't turn up anything, so apologies if this has been covered before.
Does anyone out there run those roo whistle thingys?
Got any feedback on whether they work or not?
Ta.
Did read a serious assessment of them which pointed out that the sound they generate was outside the roos hearing anyway. The electronic ones do work but they produce an additional normal range noise (from speakers in the unit mounted at front of vehicle) as well and I reckon thats what does it for them. Having watched them a lot while driving or riding along our road am pretty convinced that the beat of a single or twin works really well and less so for a multi. Believe they can locate the sound of a single or twin pretty well and move away but that the drone of a multi is less directional. It could also be that the beat is more meaningful to them as it is like an animal galloping.
Also make this observation, and its about unseen 3rd party effects, we live on a ridge above the road and when my vastly better half leaves of a morning i watch her drive out, wave goodbye etc. We often have roos on the place and as she starts to drive down they react and frequently head across the road into the bush. The point is that a vehicle coming past at the same time could well hit one and from that drivers viewpoint, "the bloody thing jumped right in front of me"
So, +2 for loud pipes
cheers Graeme
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:57 AM   #96
PeterW
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Originally Posted by omeoxlv View Post
Did read a serious assessment of them which pointed out that the sound they generate was outside the roos hearing anyway. The electronic ones do work but they produce an additional normal range noise (from speakers in the unit mounted at front of vehicle) as well and I reckon thats what does it for them. Having watched them a lot while driving or riding along our road am pretty convinced that the beat of a single or twin works really well and less so for a multi. Believe they can locate the sound of a single or twin pretty well and move away but that the drone of a multi is less directional. It could also be that the beat is more meaningful to them as it is like an animal galloping.
Also make this observation, and its about unseen 3rd party effects, we live on a ridge above the road and when my vastly better half leaves of a morning i watch her drive out, wave goodbye etc. We often have roos on the place and as she starts to drive down they react and frequently head across the road into the bush. The point is that a vehicle coming past at the same time could well hit one and from that drivers viewpoint, "the bloody thing jumped right in front of me"
So, +2 for loud pipes
cheers Graeme
Since I collected a Roo with my twin a couple of weeks ago

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Old 02-07-2013, 04:31 PM   #97
luca9277
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Kangaroos and motorcycles

From time to time you read or hear about the unlucky rider who happens to find a roo in his path, a few times it turns to tragedy.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/motorcycli...208-2e2cs.html

I remember once talking to a guy who had a couple of tiny plastic cones attached to his front fender which supposedly generated a high pitch noise when the bike is moving.

Does any of you guys know whether they work or not and where they can be purchased?
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Old 02-07-2013, 04:35 PM   #98
ECKS-Man
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No they don't work. About the only thing you can do with roos is avoid them. Choose your riding times and locations - and speed. Even the Shu-Roo things don't work 100% of the time. It is one thing to scare a roo off the road, but it usually isn't the ones ON the road that you'll hit. The danger is when they come on to the road from the side. The only way to avoid those buggers is to be travelling slowly enough to brake.

Just my experience.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:11 PM   #99
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Originally Posted by ECKS-Man View Post
The danger is when they come on to the road from the side.

Just my experience.
And mine as well.
I have had roo's jump straight into the side of the truck and go under the wheels.
Closer the trees to edge of the road, slower I go on the bike and in the car.
Blowing a horn is not always a good idea either as it scares/disorients them and they can go in any direction, sometimes straight into you.
Better to drop your lights and navigate around them.
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Old 02-08-2013, 06:27 AM   #100
TravellingStrom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ECKS-Man View Post
No they don't work. About the only thing you can do with roos is avoid them. Choose your riding times and locations - and speed. Even the Shu-Roo things don't work 100% of the time. It is one thing to scare a roo off the road, but it usually isn't the ones ON the road that you'll hit. The danger is when they come on to the road from the side. The only way to avoid those buggers is to be travelling slowly enough to brake.

Just my experience.
I agree, or have a set of metal panniers and kill the suckers. Mind you that was unintentional on my part, they did the normal thing and came at me from 90 degrees at a fast pace, I had time to select the small one before he T-boned me.

I was doing 100kmh and tankslapped for a while, when I gained control(staying upright and no oncoming cars) I saw him still rolling down the centre line.

Nothing can stop a roo, they are too dumb to know
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Old 02-09-2013, 05:34 AM   #101
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Good HID lights turn night into day (which I always switch off if possible once an animal has been sighted if speed/moonlight conditions allow), plus knowing how to scan the road properly and always ask a local about the area ahead if possible are the best ways to reduce your impact chances. A simple tip I learnt from a Pro Roo Shooter mate is that the little buggers won't move around on a windy night, so unless they're sitting on the roadside in a drought affected area, eating the greener grass or waiting for rain to fall or damp night dew to form on bitumen surfaces, you're less likely to encounter them if it's blowing hard. I'm guessing it's because their coats aren't very thick and they have no body fat, so they need to shelter to conserve heat.
The plastic whistle things would be more effective if you shoved them up your arse - the sudden rush of air through them just before impact might create enough sound to scare a stray animal into flight while you're hard on the brakes. Somebody got rich on the idea anyway. I guess that's what matters.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:33 AM   #102
GMess
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Colleague had a ShooRoo on a Subaru Outback. He ran a basic, replicated research trial where he ran the same section of road between Morven and Augathella in both directions, at dawn and dusk, over many days with the device on and off.
He counted the numbers of roos that moved towards the road and and the numbers that moved away from the road as well as the numbers that just stayed where they were. When he ran a statistical analysis of the data the ShooRoo made no significant difference to roo behaviour.
When we look at roo strikes across all our field staff of around 30 people averaging 50,000 km per year over the last 25 years the only valid correlation we can make is against the age of the driver.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:42 AM   #103
outback jack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GMess View Post
Colleague had a ShooRoo on a Subaru Outback. He ran a basic, replicated research trial where he ran the same section of road between Morven and Augathella in both directions, at dawn and dusk, over many days with the device on and off.
He counted the numbers of roos that moved towards the road and and the numbers that moved away from the road as well as the numbers that just stayed where they were. When he ran a statistical analysis of the data the ShooRoo made no significant difference to roo behaviour.
When we look at roo strikes across all our field staff of around 30 people averaging 50,000 km per year over the last 25 years the only valid correlation we can make is against the age of the driver.
He certainly picked a good section of road for that trial, that's deadly Roo country through there. On another note the main roads did a trial here near Bark'y just out of town. They placed guide posts at 3 meter centers with reflectors on all sides so the head lights would hit them at any angle. The death rate quadroupled so they canned it quick. i have had real good success at using my very bright indicator lights to make them jump away from the road.
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