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Old 02-10-2013, 08:48 PM   #46
Bill Harris
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Good point, but "And all the advice above", which covered just-wetted streets.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by duck View Post
I'm sorry but if it hasn't rained in a while then this can be some REALLY, REALLY bad advice. This is when your traction will be the absolute worst as the oil that's formed a film on the dry surface will come to the top before it runs off. In fact, the harder it rains, the better off you are traction-wise during the first 30 minutes or so of rain.

I live in Seattle where it rains on and off more or less all of the time ten months out of the year so it's rarely an issue for us but after a couple of weeks in July or August when it hasn't rained I wouldn't even consider riding in a light rain. I would literally take a bus or walk before I'd get anywhere near a bike under those conditions.
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Old 02-10-2013, 09:13 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c3eh View Post
I am probably a noob I'll admit that and I have never ridden in rain (drizzle, downpour whatever) so I was curious how dangerous is it really to ride in rain?
All that came to mind was losing traction in a corner
So just in general or if you have a personal story either one really I was just curious.
are you a total noob or just a newbie to rain?

big difference ... most replies are from experienced riders. if you are a total noob to riding... do yourself a favor and get used to your bike dry before doing much time in the rain.
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Old 02-10-2013, 09:27 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _cy_ View Post
are you a total noob or just a newbie to rain?

big difference ... most replies are from experienced riders. if you are a total noob to riding... do yourself a favor and get used to your bike dry before doing much time in the rain.
Nah I have been riding a year give or take just happen to have a car so when it rains I drive.
Also I don't have all the proper rain gear so another reason I just drive my car. Riding is just so much more fun and as I mentioned in an earlier reply I am trying to plan a cross country trip for summer and rain certainly won't stop it.

Honestly I am not scared to ride in rain, at this point it is mainly just don't have the gear and do have a car. The question just came to mind today because it was raining and I know there are riders of all types and skill levels on here to offer opinions.
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Old 02-10-2013, 09:30 PM   #49
_cy_
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if you've been riding for a year ... dive in... the water is fine
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:08 PM   #50
PeterW
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No but ... the learning curve is pretty bad

That's one of the reasons I usually ride weekends no matter what the weather, and generally pick the nasty winding mountain roads if it's bad weather - with practice it's not really a problem, but the feel for the bike fades fast if you don't keep the skills up with practice.

Last weekend wasn't one of the good ones, nice pattern of shimmery oil spots all up my favourite ride - now that was a bit nervous. Went past the turnoff to the road where the asswipe with the leaky transmission lived and my speed went up 20kph.

Personally I'd suggest getting out rainy weekends , pick quiet roads with a few bends and just ride so you can learn without having to deal with traffic as well.

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Old 02-10-2013, 11:45 PM   #51
OlivierS
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I bought my bike just before winter, have been driving in nothing but rain, heavy winds, last week even a tiny bit of snow.

I completly lost self esteem (and the trust in my front tire) after I pulled off the highway cause I couldn't even see the lights of the car in front of me, and then, on a roundabout the front tire of my 990 was suddenly gone. I managed to keep it upright though. Was more luck then skill anyway...

I am still not sure what happend, maybe there was a patch of oil, maybe I went in too fast, but like I said it took me weeks before I dared to lean deep into corners again.

Yesterday however, was the first dry day that I was not working since weeks, felt like months even. And eventhough temperatures were arround freezing I really enjoyed driving on a dry road, helped me to regain self esteem and practice my skills.

I will get rid of the scorpions though, concidering a conti trailattack tire, hope that will give me some better grip on wet days.
Tire's make all the difference.
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:07 AM   #52
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I spent yesterday riding in "extreme weather", which had warnings dominating out national news: rain, floods, freezing temps, snow, strong winds, very dense fog. None of it made that much difference other than making me ride a little slower than usual and that was predominantly due to decreased visibility.

Tip: Riding dirt, thereby getting used to the bike slithering about (and that you don't freak out and crash as a result) is a big help. That way white paint, drain covers, etc. will be far less of a problem for you.
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:38 AM   #53
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Great advice to follow.
I ride in rain a lot. IMO riding in rain is not any more dangerous than riding in dry condition.

I always use riding in rain as a chance to practice my skill for riding in wet condition ...or to hone my skill for riding in rain. So if it rains out there, just go out and ride the bike, use it as a chance to learn how to ride your bike in rain. Just remember to stay away during the first 10-15 minutes as other have suggested.
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Old 02-11-2013, 04:26 AM   #54
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Next time it rains, go for a short ride
and after that go for a longer ride in the rain.
Keep repeating until your an old salt at rain riding.
Only way to learn is to get out and do it.
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Old 02-11-2013, 05:48 AM   #55
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It doesn't rain often in NM but when it does it's usually a torrential downpour that, if you're in a car, the windshield wipers can't go fast enough for you to be able to see, and the roads flood badly near the curb almost immediately.

It doesn't matter what you are driving, that shit is dangerous to be in. Don't forget about the huge lightening all over the place, and the good chance you'll get hailed on too.

During the monsoon/rainy season here, I don't commute on the bike too much.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:21 AM   #56
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Sure there's less traction, butt yer rotors are wet, so there's less brake'in too.
Just be smooth, 'n you'll be fine. (And be thankful yer no0t ride'in and old '70's vintage bike with crappy brakes, suspension, 'n bias ply tires.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:50 AM   #57
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as long as I don't need a snorkel I don't mind.


In fact I like the noise of the rain on my helmet.

tap.....taptaptaptap


Annoying bits:

visor down = fog. visor up = 3 gallons of water in the back of my sinuses.

with waterproof gear though it's just another day with a few different inputs.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:51 AM   #58
randyo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciferMutt View Post
It doesn't rain often in NM but when it does it's usually a torrential downpour that, if you're in a car, the windshield wipers can't go fast enough for you to be able to see, and the roads flood badly near the curb almost immediately.

It doesn't matter what you are driving, that shit is dangerous to be in. Don't forget about the huge lightening all over the place, and the good chance you'll get hailed on too.

During the monsoon/rainy season here, I don't commute on the bike too much.
I find that the faster you go the better you can see in the rain and if I can maintain a 35-40 mph pace or faster, I can adjust my windscreen and open my visor partially and all the rain (or sometimes frozen precipitation) gets diverted from my vision
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:06 AM   #59
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My 2 cents?

Get good rain gear. If you aren't wet, shivering uncontrollably, and generally miserable, you will be more relaxed and better equipped to deal with the conditions. Keep a good coat of non-abrasive wax on the face shield. All I have to do is turn my head to the side and the water blows right off. (Bonus: Makes it easier to remove bugs in dry weather.) If you normally use a tinted shield, keep a clear one, preferably a pin lock, handy for rainy days. I have a reflective vest for night riding that I will wear when it rains. Visibility is low when it rains. Do what you can to make it easier for the cagers to see you.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:57 PM   #60
dddd
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TEST IT.

While upright, and at slow speed at which you know you cant fall or loose control, and on various surface you expect to ride, try to find the rear wheel blocking threshold. (and very carefully the front wheel blocking threshold if you dare or need more feel from the hand). Assuming you know your bike on dry surfaces and you remain objective, you should be able to have a feel of the traction available. backoff a bit from this braking intensity further cause at higher speed, the water doesn't clear as easily.

Also try to start on painted lines a few times when alone on a stop (upright again of course ), so you can understand how easily it looses traction.

Also try to compare tire tracks with center of the lane, tire tracks are cleaner, but the dip contains more water.. Center of the lane not as clean, but possibly not as flooded, especially in city streets with lots of big trucks carving the pavement.

Feeling he force of breaking and starting at threshold is a better way imho than testing the limits in a curve at whichever lean angle...Every ride, rainy or not, there is always 2 seconds here or there to do such test. Build your comparison base.

PS: the foot test is BS, sorry. you have to be quite experienced, very used to do it, with the same clean sole boots (no mud, no grease, no grass, etc. to feel anythng that you might interpret very approximately anyway. About as good as touching the ground with your gloves....
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