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Old 02-10-2013, 03:27 PM   #1666
josjor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkster70 View Post
.


...and something I've been wanting that will make my life WAY easier - a 50 foot, 50A welding extension cord so I don't have to play musical chairs with all the junk on my driveway when I want to do a couple welds outside!
Be prepared to spend good money. I have 3 of them that I use in my pro-audio business. I've had them for about 10 years so I don't remember what I paid for them, but I remember almost fainting when I got the bill. I had my local electrician make the or order them. Don't remember which.

Each one of them must weigh 50lbs or more and they're fun to coil.
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listen mister, we didnt evolve porcelin shitters just so we could squat to take a shit, like monkeys.
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:49 PM   #1667
JimVonBaden
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Got home a little while ago. Cool ride from Front Royal to Alexandria!

Here are a few shots of the new Panniers by Kirk!

A reminder of the original design:


The mounts are a work of art!



They seems happy to be getting mounted:


First shot mounted:


More glamor shots:




The insides are as clean as the outsides:



The very nice locking latches:



The hinges:


And, a couple parting shots:



The other bike belongs to an inmate here who has leaking seals. I'm going to break it in half to fix it. But that is another story.

Jim
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:55 PM   #1668
NoVa Rider
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Very nice!
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Old 02-10-2013, 05:10 PM   #1669
kirkster70 OP
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Whoops! I completely forgot to vacuum those out! Sorry about that.

I'm glad you are happy with them. It was fun meeting and working with you!


Your garage is very nice and tidy! Me likey!!!
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Old 02-10-2013, 06:12 PM   #1670
JimVonBaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkster70 View Post
Whoops! I completely forgot to vacuum those out! Sorry about that.

I'm glad you are happy with them. It was fun meeting and working with you!


Your garage is very nice and tidy! Me likey!!!
Same here Kirk!

Let me know when you are ready to spruce yours up! I'm all in!

Jim
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:56 PM   #1671
Retired-N-Roamin
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Wookie? HA! Not Likely!

Kirk,

Found this thread from Jim's cheap farkels thread.

Being recently retired and roamin' - I have no fixed abode to have all these wonderful tools that you have.

But... I spent 4/5ths of my working years as some sort of mechanic. First in the garage helping my older cousin build his hot rod, then in a service station (yeah, in the 60's a teenager could actually work in a real repair-type service station), then the Navy after high school, then after getting a degree in 'Machining Technology' I spent nearly 22 years in heavy industry working at various times as a machinist and millwright. Our 70 person millwright crew maintained all of the equipment in a 2,000 ton/day paper mill. I've had the opportunity to fabricate and/or repair parts ranging from a few ounces to a couple of tons. I got pretty good at 'Mcgivering' stuff to keep production going. Heck, I've even welded a few inches here and there!

All this to give you some 'bona fides' that I might - just possibly - have a clue or three and know whereof I speak.

You're no wookie. Period.

Your work as documented in this thread is as fine as I have ever seen. And even if I was a pretty good fabricator as a journeyman millwright/machinist, your demonstrated skills are as good as the best of the men I worked with - and there were a few that were masters of their crafts.

I understand you're trying to be humble by saying you're just been doing this for a few years, but from what I've seen you're well on the way to being a master craftsman, and that is well beyond the run-of-the-mill journeyman.

Yeah, you make a mistake from time to time. So what? You're trying new things, new ways and different ideas. But even when the bends aren't quite 90 - you salvage your 'oopses' into fine looking finished products.

I highly commend you for taking the time and sharing all of your foibles and successes with the inmates here.

I leave you with this thought - one that took me years to really understand. "Perfect" is the enemy of "gud-e-nuff" Perfectionism is a disease. It stops progress and drives us crazy.

As a machinist doing a bearing seat I strove to get the exact 'perfect' measurement - to the 10,000th of an inch. I'd take 15 minutes trying to achieve this state of perfection. After years of beating myself up over missing by 2 or 3 10,000ths, I finally realized it didn't matter as long as the fit was within tolerance - in this case usually .001. This was a revelation - it freed me from driving myself crazy and up'd my productivity significantly. Heck, even my boss recognized this transformation. So... I ended up a lot less frustrated and as a result I slept better, didn't growl at momma and the kids so much and needed many fewer antacid pills.

So please, find your own comfort level where you know you are doing the best you are capable of, but if something ain't perfect I'll wager that it's really gud-e-nuff.

Now, I hope you'll still be doing this when I need a set of paniers built for my next GS.

Best wishes,

Leo

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Old 02-10-2013, 08:23 PM   #1672
Kyle B
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WOW! I'm hooked on this thread! I've been really procrastinating on buying a TIG welder, but I'd really enjoy welding with something that clean!

Time to clean out some Delta wood shapers to make room in the shop.
Anyone interested in a receiver hitch for their R1200GS? Mine has been thoroughly tested towing my DRZ400.
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Old 02-10-2013, 09:00 PM   #1673
JimVonBaden
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Great post Leo!

I think many of us feel the same about Kirk's work!

Take it from one who has see it first hand, and spent a few hours with him, Kirk is a genuine guy who is not out there trying to fool anyone, especially himself! He has real tallent, and an ability to see things most of us lack!

Jim
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:05 PM   #1674
kirkster70 OP
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WOW!!!

Thank you very much, Leo!

I sincerely appreciate everything you just said!! It really makes me feel good to get complimented from someone with the vast experience that you have! I feel like I'm on the right track!

Thanks again - Kirk.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired-N-Roamin View Post
Kirk,

Found this thread from Jim's cheap farkels thread.

Being recently retired and roamin' - I have no fixed abode to have all these wonderful tools that you have.

But... I spent 4/5ths of my working years as some sort of mechanic. First in the garage helping my older cousin build his hot rod, then in a service station (yeah, in the 60's a teenager could actually work in a real repair-type service station), then the Navy after high school, then after getting a degree in 'Machining Technology' I spent nearly 22 years in heavy industry working at various times as a machinist and millwright. Our 70 person millwright crew maintained all of the equipment in a 2,000 ton/day paper mill. I've had the opportunity to fabricate and/or repair parts ranging from a few ounces to a couple of tons. I got pretty good at 'Mcgivering' stuff to keep production going. Heck, I've even welded a few inches here and there!

All this to give you some 'bona fides' that I might - just possibly - have a clue or three and know whereof I speak.

You're no wookie. Period.

Your work as documented in this thread is as fine as I have ever seen. And even if I was a pretty good fabricator as a journeyman millwright/machinist, your demonstrated skills are as good as the best of the men I worked with - and there were a few that were masters of their crafts.

I understand you're trying to be humble by saying you're just been doing this for a few years, but from what I've seen you're well on the way to being a master craftsman, and that is well beyond the run-of-the-mill journeyman.

Yeah, you make a mistake from time to time. So what? You're trying new things, new ways and different ideas. But even when the bends aren't quite 90 - you salvage your 'oopses' into fine looking finished products.

I highly commend you for taking the time and sharing all of your foibles and successes with the inmates here.

I leave you with this thought - one that took me years to really understand. "Perfect" is the enemy of "gud-e-nuff" Perfectionism is a disease. It stops progress and drives us crazy.

As a machinist doing a bearing seat I strove to get the exact 'perfect' measurement - to the 10,000th of an inch. I'd take 15 minutes trying to achieve this state of perfection. After years of beating myself up over missing by 2 or 3 10,000ths, I finally realized it didn't matter as long as the fit was within tolerance - in this case usually .001. This was a revelation - it freed me from driving myself crazy and up'd my productivity significantly. Heck, even my boss recognized this transformation. So... I ended up a lot less frustrated and as a result I slept better, didn't growl at momma and the kids so much and needed many fewer antacid pills.

So please, find your own comfort level where you know you are doing the best you are capable of, but if something ain't perfect I'll wager that it's really gud-e-nuff.

Now, I hope you'll still be doing this when I need a set of paniers built for my next GS.

Best wishes,

Leo

.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:06 PM   #1675
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle B View Post
WOW! I'm hooked on this thread! I've been really procrastinating on buying a TIG welder, but I'd really enjoy welding with something that clean!

Time to clean out some Delta wood shapers to make room in the shop.
Anyone interested in a receiver hitch for their R1200GS? Mine has been thoroughly tested towing my DRZ400.
Thanks, Kyle!
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:17 PM   #1676
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A quick little project...



I start with some dimensions...



...then I tear into the scrap pile. This used to be a server rack.



Now I need to make the top. I really didn't want to scab a bunch of different pieces of sheet metal together. I wanted a single, smooth top. I bend a 2" flange on a piece of .080" 5052 aluminum.



It fits so snugly on the frame that I need to smack it down with a wooden block. No fasteners needed! Ok! Works for me!



The table is for catching cuts coming off the shear. Now I don't have to crawl on my hands and knees to pick up the little scraps under the shear. It was a simple project that will make my life easier. Plus, it won't sound like a cymbal crashing every tiime I shear a large piece. Nothing fancy, but it will get the job done.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:04 PM   #1677
JimVonBaden
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I knew you were going to use that material, but damn, great job!

Now you have me thinking. I need to make a work cover for my lift. I use it as a table for all my basic work and filming. Can you bend stainless?



I'm thinking I build up a platform I can rest on it, a rectangle of some of your scrap I have left over, then add a SS sheet for light work for filming. It wouldn't need a lot of support.

OR, maybe, bend it to fit on the lip of the lift?



Not too thick, but thick enough to hold up.

Jim
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Old 02-12-2013, 06:20 AM   #1678
summerman
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I know this is old thread but

Quote:
Originally Posted by kubiak View Post
heres a pic of the tank i made before the last one, it was 6.2 gallons and a little more sporty looking.
I love this bike. Love it Love it. Great work
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:36 PM   #1679
bwalsh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kirkster70 View Post
A quick little project...


That turned out real nice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by summerman View Post
I love this bike. Love it Love it. Great work
Kubiak makes some nice things!
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Old 02-12-2013, 04:05 PM   #1680
kirkster70 OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
I knew you were going to use that material, but damn, great job!

Now you have me thinking. I need to make a work cover for my lift. I use it as a table for all my basic work and filming. Can you bend stainless?



I'm thinking I build up a platform I can rest on it, a rectangle of some of your scrap I have left over, then add a SS sheet for light work for filming. It wouldn't need a lot of support.

OR, maybe, bend it to fit on the lip of the lift?



Not too thick, but thick enough to hold up.

Jim
My brake drops 2 gauges on stainless, so I go as thick as 16ga. That would look nice. I can also bend up to 4' wide. I looks like your lift is longer...
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