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Old 02-18-2013, 06:14 PM   #4291
Trixie
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I've also come across a much more detailed recount of the adventure. It addressed some of the mech and financial issues and the creativity the crew used to overcome both. Being a premier craft in the best airline in the biz (at that time) certainly helped, too.
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Old 02-18-2013, 06:23 PM   #4292
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Not that it didn't happen but I've read most of not all the Pan Am histories and haven't heard about this event.
As for other points: I know that many charter companies (even at least one regular scheduled airlines) going to out of the way places with shaky social infrastructure had (or have) a safe box on the plane with considerable cash on-board - usually good old USD greenbacks. Other points: while some 4 engine aircraft have taken off on three engines (essentially empty-ferry flights) I doubt that plane could take off on 3 engines with enough fuel for an ocean crossing, and I don't believe those engines were "top secret" either. It does make the story a little richer though.
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Old 02-19-2013, 07:36 AM   #4293
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Any of you guys fly sailplanes?

A long time ago I took a few lessons and got soloed in an old Schweizer. Never finished the rating though.

20 years and 12,000 (powered) hours later, I'm thinking about getting back into gliders and finishing my rating. I haven't flown any kind of light aircraft since about 1995, so it could be interesting .
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Old 02-19-2013, 07:43 AM   #4294
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Originally Posted by vspeed View Post
Any of you guys fly sailplanes?

A long time ago I took a few lessons and got soloed in an old Schweizer. Never finished the rating though.

20 years and 12,000 (powered) hours later, I'm thinking about getting back into gliders and finishing my rating. I haven't flown any kind of light aircraft since about 1995, so it could be interesting .
No soaring around here, unfortunately. I went up a bunch when I was at the USAF Academy as a controller in the early 80's. They had 2-33's and some high(er) performance stuff too. Flew in the towplanes quite often too. Perfect soaring there with mountain and ridge waves, plus good and easy to find thermals over some of the larger developed areas at the academy on calmer days. I can't imagine soaring in some areas where it's pretty much a trip around the pattern and that's it.
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Old 02-19-2013, 07:50 AM   #4295
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Yeah I don't think Ohio is exactly a soaring "mecca" either. But I'm sure you can catch a thermal here and there during the summer. I might get into the towplanes too. I've really missed flying light planes, this might be a good way to get back into it.
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:50 AM   #4296
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Yeah I don't think Ohio is exactly a soaring "mecca" either. But I'm sure you can catch a thermal here and there during the summer. I might get into the towplanes too. I've really missed flying light planes, this might be a good way to get back into it.
I took a few sailplane flights at a small glider port north of Cincy. I googled the area and Caesar Creek Soaring Club popped up. They had a pretty nice group of people.
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Old 02-19-2013, 10:16 AM   #4297
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Me too. I've keep telling myself that I should get into soaring for a long time - and I live close enough to a premier area, the Sierra's. My imagination was that it is an idyllic sort of flying, smooth and silent. But no, I imagine low wing loading and the Sierra's thermals make it quite the opposite. But probably you're so interested in staying aloft and getting lift that you'll take the pounding. After large airplanes if you haven't flown a light plane for a long time it is indeed pretty fun, after the initial over rotation....I've found there's more "fun" and aesthetics in light planes, but less safety/redundancy and more getting beaten up.
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Old 02-19-2013, 10:36 AM   #4298
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http://www.aviationbanter.com/showthread.php?t=36823

Very good read with more details on the clipper.

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Old 02-19-2013, 10:48 AM   #4299
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Originally Posted by chazbird View Post
Me too. I've keep telling myself that I should get into soaring for a long time - and I live close enough to a premier area, the Sierra's. My imagination was that it is an idyllic sort of flying, smooth and silent. But no, I imagine low wing loading and the Sierra's thermals make it quite the opposite. But probably you're so interested in staying aloft and getting lift that you'll take the pounding. After large airplanes if you haven't flown a light plane for a long time it is indeed pretty fun, after the initial over rotation....I've found there's more "fun" and aesthetics in light planes, but less safety/redundancy and more getting beaten up.
Yeah I'm expecting the controls in a glider to require a much lighter touch than the airliners do. I'm wondering about the cockpit height difference too, in regards to judging the landing flare. I don't know how high above the ground the cockpit seat is in my jet when it's sitting on it's landing gear, but it's got to be at least 10 or 12 feet. When the jet's main gear touch down on landing, my eye level is probably 15 or 20 feet in the air. In the glider it will only be about 3 or 4 feet up. I'm sure that will take some getting used to.
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Old 02-19-2013, 11:18 AM   #4300
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Gliders will sure reacquaint you to using the rudder. Going from from a sit high plane to a sit low feels like at first you're "oh no, it's gear up, to oh my God, I'm sinking into a giant unseen rut in the runway". Guess that's better than what can happen the other way around: A new DC-10 captain, who transitioned from the 727 without first flying the 10 came in the morning after a red-eye and didn't make the turn off because the optic flow-speed sensation in the 10 looked like the right speed for the 727.
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Old 02-22-2013, 09:32 AM   #4301
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Cleaning out my desk, I came across a "Fun Facts" sheet for the C-5 Galaxy, so I thought I'd share here.
  • The interior and exterior paint on the C-5 weighs 2600 pounds.
  • The distance of the first flight by the Wright brothers was less than the length of the C-5 cargo floor.
  • The cargo compartment of the C-5 will hold 100 model 113 (Beetle) Volkswagens, 106 Vegas, 90 Ramblers, 58 Cadillacs, or 6 standard Greyhound buses.
  • More than 100 miles of wiring are required to functionally operate all C-5 aircraft systems.
  • The C-5 carries enough fuel for the average American car to make 130 round trips between New York and Los Angeles, or 31 trips around the world.
  • Each C-5 engine gulps approximately 42 tons of air per minute.
  • The cargo compartment of the C-5 is large enough to hold an eight-lane bowling alley.
  • The total engine power of a C-5 equals that produced by 800 average cars.
  • Each C-5 tire wears down approximately 0.002 inches per landing.
  • Each C-5 wheel brake wears down approximately 0.0005 inches per landing.
  • The C-5 contains over five miles of control cables.
  • The C-5 can carry 25,844,746 ping pong balls.
  • The C-5 can carry 328,301,674 aspirin tablets.
  • The C-5 can carry 3,222,857 tortillas.
  • Each wing of the C-5 weighs over 40,000, which is equivalent to the weight of a C-130, minus engines.
  • Each C-5 contains over four miles of tubing.
  • The C-5 can haul 3,934 bushels of wheat.
  • The C-5 cargo area is able to carry more automobiles than 13 transport trucks, or two "car-carrying" freight cars.
  • Each C-5 engine nacelle is 1 ½ times the length of a Cadillac, large enough to garage a Mustang.
  • Fuel capacity of the C-5, 49,000 gallons, would empty 6 ½ rail tank cars.
  • Also, its fuel capacity is equal to the volume of an average five-room house.
  • The C-5 can carry 76,216 fifths of California wine, or 277,263 cans (12 oz.) of your favorite beverage.
  • Tire on the C-5, (24 on the MLG, 4 on the NLG), weigh 4214 pounds. They hold 181 pounds of air when inflated to the prescribed pressure.
  • A full C-5 load of first class mail would require $1,491,200 in postage.
  • The environmental control systems of the C-5 has a total cooling capacity of 24 tons; enough to air condition eight average sized homes.
  • Fuel weight of the C-5 is about equal to the maximum gross weight of the C-141A model.
  • If all the exposed surfaces of the C-5, which is computed to be 33,526.6 square feet, were covered in ice of uniform 1/16" thickness, it would weigh 9,778.6 pounds.
  • Christopher Columbus' entire three ship crew of 90 could have ridden comfortably in the upper deck of the C-5, leaving the whole cargo compartment for horses, chickens, goats, and trinkets for the Indians.
  • Theoretically, the C-5 can hold 2,419,558 golf balls, provided they are not in containers or otherwise restrained.
  • There are approximately 1,658,800 fasteners in the C-5 aircraft. They are located as follows: wings-411,900; fuselage-1,182,000; empennage-64,900.
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:22 PM   #4302
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Can anyone ID this radial motor?




Still feeling the P&W 1690 or more specifically the bmw 132. They were also built on licence by the germans, and low and behold this motor has metric bolts/nuts on it. No data plate anywhere I can find. Did get 2 cylinders off it today. Looks like someone else took it apart before me and cleaned it up some...probably years ago. No pushrods, some rockers missing, no piston rings.

Seriously sitting here wondering just what this motor has seen in its life.
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mfp4073 screwed with this post 02-22-2013 at 04:32 PM
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:40 PM   #4303
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I was thinking the C5 can't compare with a B727's flight deck foot rests - but it appears they have them too.
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Old 02-22-2013, 06:35 PM   #4304
BillsR100
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Originally Posted by pilot815 View Post
http://www.aviationbanter.com/showthread.php?t=36823

Very good read with more details on the clipper.

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Concerning the Boeing 314 Honolulu Clipper. I just spent 30 minutes reading all about her and the attempt to recover her.



"The Hunt for a Boeing B-314 Flying Boat
Pan American NC18601 - the Honolulu Clipper
"

http://rbogash.com/B314.html


Images of a replica
http://flyingboatmuseum.smugmug.com/...2028&k=D2mqpKm
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Old 02-26-2013, 02:22 AM   #4305
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Paid a visit to one of our airforce museums on Friday: https://picasaweb.google.com/1148217...eat=directlink
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