ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > GS Boxers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-01-2011, 05:34 AM   #76
Daryl_Stamp
Studly Adventurer
 
Daryl_Stamp's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: FL NY
Oddometer: 760
We recently got rid of 6 @ our local car mechanic. No fee; but we take good care of them during the Holidays.
__________________
Live while you're alive.
Daryl_Stamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2012, 10:23 AM   #77
Aventeren
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Location: Did It: US to Ushuaia, Argentina
Oddometer: 181
Great post. This noob will be trying this shortly.
Aventeren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2012, 09:30 AM   #78
manfromthestix OP
Lost in Space
 
manfromthestix's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Lexington, Virginia
Oddometer: 2,148
Thanks for all the positive comments and additional tips/pointers/equipment suggestions! I've saved probably $1000 on tire changes since I posted this, maybe more, and apparently spurred sales of the Parnes balancer as well! That's a great tool and very easy to use.

I thought I'd add a note on tires. I've run a number of sets of Metzeler Tourances on my GS in 50,000 miles and have always been mostly pleased with them, but have had the infamous "Tourance Wobble" and funky cupping issues that many other riders have reported. About a year ago I thought Man, I'm tired of paying $320 to $350 for a set and still getting around 7,500 miles out of a rear and 10,000 out of a front while putting up with the cupping and wobble for almost half their lives. I'd seen several posts on this website about Shinko tires and decided to try a set last year.




I got these from Motorcycle Superstore, $170 for the pair with free shipping, and they showed up at my doorstep about 30 hours after I placed the order. In the size for a BMW GS these are RADIAL tires; it's my understanding that Shinko also produces this tire in other sizes but they are BIAS PLY tires. I've seen a number of comments on this and other sites about problems with the bias ply tires, but the concensus seems to be that the radials are quite good.

I've put about 6,500 miles on this set in ~11 months and the rear is getting close to the wear bars, so I've got a new one sitting in the garage waiting for the proper time to swap it out. The front still looks new so I'm not touching it. The Shinko rubber compound is softer than the Tourances so I think they are a little better for gravel/dirt than the Tourances and they have bigger spaces between the blocks which also helps. I think they are rated 75% road/25% trail and that seems about right. I typically ride two-up with full luggage and we do lots of ratty asphalt and dirt roads, plus the occasional high-speed Interstate run when necessary. Since there are no straight roads in Virginia (it's a fact ) I haven't worn the center out of the tire as fast as I would have if I lived in FlatStraightistan. I haven't had any concerns with dry grip on asphalt, and in fact think they work better than the Tourances for how hard I ride. We get a lot of rain here and I have not had a single issue with wet traction. The softer rubber and bigger blocks make for a bit more "buzz" on asphalt, like running a snow tire versus all-season on your car, but it's hardly noticeable. I've seen a little bit of cupping on the rear tire in the later miles, but not as bad as the Tourances.

I have to admit that I feel free to roost and slide corners more often with these tires than I did with the 2X$$$ Metzelers, so I've been very pleased with the wear given that I've used them pretty hard. I had no issue with balancing, no trouble with the rubber blocks ripping, and haven't even had a flat with these Shinkos. If I were heading for Mexico or the Dalton I'd probably run the Shinkos to get there and swap to a knobbier tire for the long hauls on dirt, but for the kind of riding I do on a daily basis I couldn't be happier with these "cheap" tires.

YMMV, of course .

Doug
__________________
"If it doesn't blow smoke and make noise, it isn't a sport!" - radio ad for shop in Bozeman, MT
manfromthestix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 01:02 PM   #79
N-m
Captain 2 Sexy
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Too Far from My Welder and BMW in South TN.
Oddometer: 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by pizzaboy View Post
where are you disposing of your old tires?
My city dump takes them for 20 cents per pound IIRC. If I don't and that number is actually $1.00 per pound it's worth it to me. Far too many old tires sitting around here.

Thanks for the thread. This is exactly what I was looking for since I will be replacing tires soon.

What is the best method for determining when to change out tires? Found this: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?p=19727629
N-m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 03:44 PM   #80
GP1200
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Oddometer: 354
I agree they do gouge us for installing motorcycle tires. No reason to be more than car tires. I'm not sure why nobody has suggested just cutting off the old tires as opposed to killing yourself trying to break the bead and get it off in one piece. Should be fairly easy if done carefully.
GP1200 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 09:06 AM   #81
gspdbill
noobie allover again
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: near Nashville, TN USA
Oddometer: 404
Quote:
Originally Posted by GP1200 View Post
I agree they do gouge us for installing motorcycle tires. No reason to be more than car tires. I'm not sure why nobody has suggested just cutting off the old tires as opposed to killing yourself trying to break the bead and get it off in one piece. Should be fairly easy if done carefully.
This has to be coming from someone who has never actually tried to do that....
There's a reason tires don't come spinning off at 100+ mph, the belts around the beads of the tires are VERY strong. Try cutting an old tire (that's off the rim) and see how easy it isn't.

Thanks so much for all the posts here, unfortunately I found this post the day after I changed the tires on my '05 GS. I've done a few tire changes so I knew what I was doing though. Did have a tough time breaking the bead off the rims and was all set to run to Harbor Freight for one of their tools when I stumbled on a YouTube video of a guy breaking his beads using the 2x4 method, it worked like a charm. Only used (1) 5' 2x4 and (1) 6" piece of 2x4 (not even attached like the OP has it) and leveraged it under the trailer hitch of my SUV and was done in under a min. Worked great!

Found it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNrhMUPxI3o

Will be getting Marc Parnes adapter for the rear wheel ASAP, thanks again for the info.
__________________
Bill
'05 R1200GS for now......
gspdbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 01:45 PM   #82
N-m
Captain 2 Sexy
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Too Far from My Welder and BMW in South TN.
Oddometer: 444
I see many pictures of riders carrying spare tires or a knobbie while riding a street or vice versa. How are they breaking the bead on a tire on a campout w/o all these devices like a Chevy 3/4 ton with 1/2 ton suspension?
N-m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 02:25 PM   #83
LaurelPerryOnLand
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Oddometer: 3,419
Simply use the WEIGHT of the bike as leverage.

Place the SIDE STAND on the bead...and push DOWN...easy.

Yeah...like the YouTube video link below

LaurelPerryOnLand screwed with this post 02-22-2013 at 07:12 PM
LaurelPerryOnLand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 02:30 PM   #84
SeeRace
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Kennesaw, Ga
Oddometer: 197
Breaking the bead

Quote:
Originally Posted by N-m View Post
I see many pictures of riders carrying spare tires or a knobbie while riding a street or vice versa. How are they breaking the bead on a tire on a campout w/o all these devices like a Chevy 3/4 ton with 1/2 ton suspension?
Here's how: I have done this before and it works great.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0nrZadIQxA
SeeRace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 07:27 AM   #85
N-m
Captain 2 Sexy
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Too Far from My Welder and BMW in South TN.
Oddometer: 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeRace View Post
Here's how: I have done this before and it works great.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0nrZadIQxA
Thanks a bunch.
N-m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 08:35 AM   #86
manfromthestix OP
Lost in Space
 
manfromthestix's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Lexington, Virginia
Oddometer: 2,148
Quote:
Originally Posted by N-m View Post
I see many pictures of riders carrying spare tires or a knobbie while riding a street or vice versa. How are they breaking the bead on a tire on a campout w/o all these devices like a Chevy 3/4 ton with 1/2 ton suspension?
You guys are sure hard on my poor old truck! I factory ordered that truck 19 years and 145,000 miles ago and it's still going strong, zero issues, just maintenance, and still looks (and rides!!!) like it was brand new. So, .



Anyway, back to the topic at hand. After years of using everything from rocks and sticks, kick stands, vices, clamps, 2X4's and trucks , professional tire machines, and everything in between I have finally found the shiz-fucking-nit for bead breaking:



Motion Pro makes good stuff; a little pricey, but really work, real strong, real light, and they are also tire irons. I still prefer the three long curvey irons for taking the tires off and getting them back on, but for packing in the bike's tool kit for on-the-road repairs these things are IT. Again, I marvel at why I didn't think something like this up myself in 50 years of wrenching on bikes, but oh well...

I'm glad to see that this thread is still alive!

Doug
__________________
"If it doesn't blow smoke and make noise, it isn't a sport!" - radio ad for shop in Bozeman, MT
manfromthestix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2013, 05:08 PM   #87
N-m
Captain 2 Sexy
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Too Far from My Welder and BMW in South TN.
Oddometer: 444
For my first bike and first tire change I am following this route described by the OP. If I don't like the Shinkos I can always switch to another tire later.

I am currently riding the Tourances and like them but they are fairly worn so I don't know how representative of their actual performance they might be. There is a large flat spot on the rear.

I have ordered the balancer from Marc Parnes. I can find no negative reviews of any of his products. On top of that when I had several questions he personally took the time to call me this evening to answer my questions! He just called me back to explain he was going to substitute one cone for a different one since I had discussed doing a Harley as well. Now I will be able to cover many Beemers, Japanese bikes and Harley's with one kit.

Thanks to anyone for the help.
N-m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2013, 07:59 PM   #88
N-m
Captain 2 Sexy
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Too Far from My Welder and BMW in South TN.
Oddometer: 444
I finally got around to pulling the rear tire this evening after picking up a nail from last weekend's ride. Now I have no choice but to change these out!

I found the Dodge 3/4 ton with 3/4 ton rims was not up to the task and do not know of anyone with the foresight to order a 3/4 ton truck with 1/2 ton rims just for the sake of breaking beads on the BMW they plan to own someday!

I tried the kick stand trick shown in the youtube video and found the center stand was too low for this job and the kick stand with its large Touratech pad would not work. I could pull the plate off but did not have time for that tonight.

Tomorrow I will get back on this and use a tire machine if I have to. I will figure something out since I want to ride to the March Motomadness rally in Huntsville, AL next weekend on Sat. if not Fri. and Sat.
N-m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 06:08 AM   #89
VEGASGSA
Need more Summer
 
VEGASGSA's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: The Northwet..
Oddometer: 6,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by N-m View Post
I finally got around to pulling the rear tire this evening after picking up a nail from last weekend's ride. Now I have no choice but to change these out!

I found the Dodge 3/4 ton with 3/4 ton rims was not up to the task and do not know of anyone with the foresight to order a 3/4 ton truck with 1/2 ton rims just for the sake of breaking beads on the BMW they plan to own someday!

I tried the kick stand trick shown in the youtube video and found the center stand was too low for this job and the kick stand with its large Touratech pad would not work. I could pull the plate off but did not have time for that tonight.

Tomorrow I will get back on this and use a tire machine if I have to. I will figure something out since I want to ride to the March Motomadness rally in Huntsville, AL next weekend on Sat. if not Fri. and Sat.
Just use three tire irons..about 2-3 inches apart..the two outers go down, hold with knee..center goes up..pop..bead is broke. You may have to work around tire a bit..but it works easily..same concept as the motion pro sticks above.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
You are not half as ugly as I thought you would be!
VEGASGSA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2013, 07:31 PM   #90
N-m
Captain 2 Sexy
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Too Far from My Welder and BMW in South TN.
Oddometer: 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGASGSA View Post
Just use three tire irons..about 2-3 inches apart..the two outers go down, hold with knee..center goes up..pop..bead is broke. You may have to work around tire a bit..but it works easily..same concept as the motion pro sticks above.
After trying every method of breaking the bead on my rear tire I finally gave up and used a tire machine. the bead was on so tight when pressure was applied the machine stalled for about one second and when the machine broke the bead there was a pop almost as loud as a gun going off. Rotated the tire and hit the pressure again and another loud pop almost as loud as the first. We had to use the machine to break the bead all the way around the rim!

I had to work for about one hour to get the tire completely off the rim with full length tire spoons you would use on a 16 inch truck rim. This was quite the chore. There are large amounts of trash, rubber, dirt and grim on the rim. I suspect this tire has been on the bike for years before enough miles were finally ridden to flatten out the tread.

Tomorrow I balance and mount the new Shinko I bought and then it's on to the front tire.
N-m is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014