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Old 03-10-2013, 12:26 PM   #74566
greener556
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motolab View Post
What symptoms/misbehavior are you looking to cure? What modifications have been performed so far?

Regards,

Derek
Bike surges at lower RPM's is the main issue. Bike is really cold blooded, not sure if that can be fixed. Snorkel has been removed, GSXR muffler mod in the works.

Leaning towards this guys solution: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...5&postcount=71
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:41 PM   #74567
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Rocket View Post
I have it on my KTM 400. great in everything except clay like mud. Really hooks up on wet rocks though.

I worry that with the low pressures and beeing on a heavy bike, the longer road sections may cause chunking. Might just have to run 15psi or more, ruining it's effectiveness.
I carry a pump.
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:43 PM   #74568
NordieBoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greener556 View Post
Bike surges at lower RPM's is the main issue. Bike is really cold blooded, not sure if that can be fixed. Snorkel has been removed, GSXR muffler mod in the works.

Leaning towards this guys solution: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...5&postcount=71
If you've removed the snorkel, then you really need to raise the needle a tad and adjust the mixture screw to suit.
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:52 PM   #74569
barko1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trailrider383 View Post
it has a warranty, take it back to the dealer and have them clean the carb. That level of running problems isn't from stock jetting.

+1
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:56 PM   #74570
Kommando
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Location: Spacecoaster FL
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Originally Posted by badweatherbiker View Post
thanks for the numbers but how the beck do you get the wheel back in after a Cush rubber replacement??
I used silicon lubricant for rubber. My back wheel slid right back into place. I find the stuff at Autozone.
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:17 PM   #74571
Kommando
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Originally Posted by eakins View Post
Kenda has gotten some good mileage out of the K761 rear because they designed in a center rear bar (like Heidenau does with 140 & 150 K60) that provide long life right down the middle.

You can see it here on the left tire pic.
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...9QEwBg&dur=516.

The Big Block was all knobs and shorter ones at that.
To fix their fast wear problems they'll either need better rubber (but I doubt if they have the technology as were talking Chinese cheap here) or just add a center rubber wear strip (the cheap fix).


If you start studying a K761 and a Heidenau K60 you see they are using the same general tread design idea.
The K761 would make a good rear tire for a mullet combo, but I'd still put $ on this one if you need to go the distance on a long tour:
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com...Rear-Tire.aspx
I use a grooving iron to cut the center bar out...and the K761s still run over 6K miles for me...2up, and I don't run them bald. I could probably spoon them back on for another 1K or so without issue. They aren't the best wet-weather or dirt tire in un-cut form, but the grooving iron can make them competent enough to get around in some nasty conditions. They made a pretty good mullet rear for weekday commuting/weekend dirtbiking.

Has anybody heard of any dual-compound dualsport tires? A 10K-mile Trackmaster II would be sweet!

I'm pretty happy with the K270 rear so far. It runs dirt, gravel, sand, light mud, and pavement without issue. If it lasts at least as long as the K761, I'll be happy with it. I can see how the K270 front could feel squirmy when new and/or leaned over though, so I'm sticking with the cheap and grippy Shinko 244 front, with it's supported sidelugs, for street.

Surprisingly, my AMS Sand Snake front knobby still corners well in the sand and mud. Going down the slab, the center knobs take most of the wear, and they seem to be able to handle it pretty darn well. For $22, I've more than gotten my money's worth out of this tire. I just don't try to corner it like a sportbike tire.
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:27 PM   #74572
Kommando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Rocket View Post
so, as a compromise tire, which gives the the better offroad grip,
Shinko 244 or Kenda 270?

Looking for something that will last longer than a full knobby, but retain as much grip in dirty situations as possible.

Since I have an 18" wheel avail, I'm even thinking about Pirelli MT43.
The Kenda K270 rear has more open voids and deeper tread than the Shinko 244. Reports also indicate that it lasts longer, with several reports of 10K+ miles existing. The K270 front is not as well-liked for pavement cornering. The cheap 244 front feels pretty good on pavement though.
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:29 PM   #74573
dman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MeterPig View Post
I had one where it was removed due to being noisy at speed. When I got my newer dr, it really was. I ran full speed up and down the mountains with no chain guide and it was unnerving to hear the chain hit the swing arm.
Just to be clear, I'm talking about the rear lower guide, not the OEM upper front roller. Well, since mine is missing, I may be wrong .... but I assume the stock rear lower guide is just a slider not a roller. Since it's plastic I assume it wouldn't make much if any noise??? (as opposed to a worn/dirty roller's bearing or bushing that would be noisy and/or frozen solid.

-dman
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:39 PM   #74574
dman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eakins View Post
there is also the IRC GP-1
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com...Rear-Tire.aspx
Shinko gets all the attention because of the good price and decent tire but IRC (japanese build) is a better tire...at $128 it's a hard sell however and most choose Kenda or Shinko instead.
I don't see much about GP-1's recently, but that's what I used in my first chapter of dual-sporting in the mid-80's on an XL600 that saw everything from the Dempster Highway to peg dragging local twisties to Death Valley rocks and gravel, after the OEM tires wore out. At the time IRC was considered a "budget" brand compared to OEM Bridgestone or Dunlop, or Michelin/Metzeler. But after some experience with modern Shinko and Kenda I'm not sure I'd spend that kind of money on the GP-1's.

-dman
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Old 03-10-2013, 02:11 PM   #74575
motolab
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greener556 View Post
Bike surges at lower RPM's is the main issue.
Put some tape on the throttle housing and the edge of the grip. Mark zero throttle with a sharpie. This is best done with the engine idling, so you can tell when the slack in the cable has just been taken up. Turn off the engine and mark wide open. Now take a tape measure (metric works best in my opinion) and measure the length of the arc. Put a mark at the mid point. Duplicate this procedure to mark the mid-point between here and zero throttle opening to get 1/4 open. Repeat for 1/8 and 1/16 openings. With the help of the marks, determine precisely during what throttle opening(s) it misbehaves. Don't have an accident trying to look at the marks while riding. If you do, I'm not responsible! Report back with results. This will help us determine what circuit(s) are responsible.
Quote:
Bike is really cold blooded, not sure if that can be fixed.
That should be curable with jetting/mixture adjustments.
Quote:
Snorkel has been removed, GSXR muffler mod in the works.
I would start with the installation of a non-USA adjustable jet needle.
Quote:
Leaning towards this guys solution: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...5&postcount=71
As I said, shimming the needle clip richens the mixture by lowering the slide rather than by raising the needle (except when the slide is against either stop), as the shim increases the preload on the slide spring. Unless the intention is actually to lower the slide for a given intersection of throttle position and rpm (except when against the stops), I would recommend installing an adjustable needle instead.

An extended fuel screw is only required when the bike will be ridden at radically varying altitudes. If not, there should be no need to fiddle with the fuel screw constantly, negating the need.

Regards,

Derek
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Old 03-10-2013, 04:54 PM   #74576
shu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Childers View Post
GO SHU GO! Man I wish I was doing something like that right now!


Question: What tank pouches are you using? I like'm.




Those are the easily modified, cheap procycle bags:

http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/dr650.html (all the way at the bottom)

modifications:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...=636483&page=3


They're pretty stout bags.

................shu
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:19 PM   #74577
ER70S-2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shu View Post
Traveling south of the border now. Time for breakfast


DR's running great. I'm going to put on the 14T sprocket for better dirt riding this morning.

................shu


Don't be afraid to post an occassional photo (or 6).
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"BTW, I don't do style. It's a dirt bike, not some girlie dress-up thing." -
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:44 PM   #74578
Rob.G
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shu View Post
Those are the easily modified, cheap procycle bags:

http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/dr650.html (all the way at the bottom)

modifications:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...=636483&page=3


They're pretty stout bags.
I have 'em and love 'em. I want to do this to them:

http://lifehacker.com/5972434/waterp...s-bag-with-wax

Since their one downside is they aren't waterproof.

Rob
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:51 PM   #74579
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motolab View Post
Shimming the needle clip richens the mixture by lowering the slide rather than by raising the needle (except when the slide is against either stop), as the shim increases the preload on the slide spring. Unless the intention is actually to lower the slide for a given intersection of throttle position and rpm (except when against the stops), I would recommend installing an adjustable needle instead.
I would think the weight of the shim could also have an affect on slide movement (argued once before I believe). Both points seem like hair splitting to the nth degree.

I think it safe to say that the shim (usually .02 to .04) also moves the needle higher in the needle jet for any given slide height.

Whatever the reason a SHIM under the stock needle usually corrects the problem 99% of the time.

Also I think your suggestion that riders mark off the throttle in 1/16 increments , and note precisely what is going on, is a little too precise for the street -- your going to get somebody injured or killed.

Rumlover screwed with this post 03-10-2013 at 06:58 PM
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Old 03-10-2013, 08:03 PM   #74580
TRAVELGUY
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Strange advice coming from someone named "Rumlover"? I would worry more about people drinking and riding or driving.

TravelGuy

Also I think your suggestion that riders mark off the throttle in 1/16 increments , and note precisely what is going on, is a little too precise for the street -- your going to get somebody injured or killed.[/QUOTE]
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