ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-16-2013, 03:06 PM   #14431
KilgoreTrout
adventure flyfisher
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Alberta Rockies
Oddometer: 362
Eh? Old days

Yes you definitely have to travel further to get to virgin riding too many farms and ranches in this area with barbwire everywhere might have too travel into northern Alberta this summer very similar country to video. Question for you Ray on your DR 750 where did you source your crash bars and screen from or is that a stock tall screen? I have some parts coming for the transalp from CMSNL but there is not much available for the DR. Is Hessler the only option I imagine shipping would be pricey. Cheers Brian
__________________
96 DR 650,,87 XL600V,89 DR 750 Big,77 Montesa Cota 247,77 TY 250,76 TY175,76 TL 250,75 CT90
KilgoreTrout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2013, 07:20 PM   #14432
Ladder106
It's a short cut, really
 
Ladder106's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,800
DR Suzuki digression on the Honda thread

DR 750 crashbars are from Hessler. Ricky Cross. They are what he recommends as "best" but I took me 2 days to mod the mounting system so it didin't stick out so far that the front tire would contact is on full fork compression.

I've seen other pics of some of the other types with large pieces of flat stock that do not hold up at all in a tip-over.

My screen is a Givi. No longer made and rare as hens teen. Keep trying to find another with no luck. I think I may take it to a fiberglass master that I know and use it for a mold to make copies. Too low to look through even on the trail so an opaque finish would be OK.

Stefans pretty much the only game in town for DR Big modded bits.

Resi on the DR750 site has some nice stuff that he's built here:

http://www.bollertante.de/photo.html
Ladder106 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2013, 11:01 PM   #14433
P3ia
Swede
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Sweden
Oddometer: 36
Just wanted to show you guys the crashbar i got from Heed, a polish firm.
Real studry and good quality. Havent dropped the bike yet but it's not going to be a poblem when I do.

I saw them on a polish forum forum and tracked em down. They had some other stuff on sale on E-bay and I asked them if they could start a sale for the Transalp crashbar there and they did a couple of minutes later. So that's where I bought it.
I saw today that they started selling all their stuff on E-bay.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/heed_heed/m.html


My crashbar:



P3ia is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2013, 08:26 PM   #14434
Dr E
Chasing after theory
 
Dr E's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Oddometer: 143
Updates and a cool tool you may not have seen...

Well it has been to long between updates so decided to couple a few things. First off here are some of my recent updates. In wanting to keep the gas tank temperature down as I have done with all my other builds, I lined the gas tank with aluminum reflective tape.





On my race bikes and busa’s this has made a large difference in fuel temperature.
A couple of months ago I was starting on the side panels and realized that my front turn signals were cracked on the lens and otherwise old. So, I updated the turn signals to LED’s. Given that the signals were not the same size as the OEM’s, I filled the spare space with mesh to act as a catch for debris that might enter the opening.




On the same note, I decided to update the lower plastic “bash” plate wherein the side panels were limited in size and since I was in a modifying mode I opened up the side panels and included some mesh. I like the overall look and since I have raised the suspension almost 8” I feel comfortable putting some time into this part. If at some point I destroy this part, I have the aluminum plate to build a nice real bash plate.




The kickstand was an issue as I had already built a new one when I installed the CR250 shock, however, once I installed the new Hyperpro shock I found that I had missed the geometry with the new stand and in essence I had an unstable bike. Soooo…this weekend I made a new stand and I am so happy with how the position of the bike. I can hope on and off the bike and nothing moves.




With all this work going on, I did not want to put the horn back in its original position…and there is a reason. I have had several hard near misses where I have only remained alive because I was able to ride out of the position I was in. Well, I have found that repositioning the horn has alleviated this issue with my other bikes. So, using the stock brackets I found a place right under the air filter that does NOT interfere with removing the filter and puts the sound right in the environment where I want it.




Back at the beginning of the build I found I was dealing with very old tires…very old! Well, with dirt tires, my NOMAR tire system does not do squat for these rims. After destroying a new set of tubes using metal tire tools, I needed a new plan. I spent a few days researching tools and found STUBBY’S which are made from Delron material. Holy Cow! I was able to change each of the tires in under 15 minutes. I am sure you guys have great tools that are well suited for doing this, but I wanted to share what I have found.









__________________
Life is the last thing you experience before you die...living is what you do every day to get you to that point...
Dr E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2013, 08:34 PM   #14435
Dr E
Chasing after theory
 
Dr E's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Oddometer: 143
Now I am concerned about a back rest for Robin and her back when she is on the back during rides. This was what I came up with and I have to say it is very comfortable. I am reutilizing the seat cover that came with the bike when I bought it and in the end…I am very happy!








Now for the meat of this post. I am sure that many of you have had to change the radiator fluid and if you follow the Honda method you will end up having to “burp” the system until the thermostat has opened and closed enough to cycle the engine until you have filled both radiators, engine and reservoir bottle. Well, I have been building cars and bikes for many years and during the rebuild in my Porsche Boxster I came across the AIRLIFT system. It allows you to fill the entire cooling system of any vehicle in less than 3 minutes.



On the Boxster I was presented with almost 40’ of radiator hose, two radiators, a complex engine and large scale reservoir…and this system filled the my car in under 4 minutes on a single shot. How it works…using a venturi system you draw a vacuum on the cooling system, switch to the fill tube and draw the fluid in…then you’re done. I have documented the process step by step. You pull 25 to 30 psi vacuum on the system, once you have the vacuum, you close the system remove the venturi attachement and wait 20 seconds. If it does not bleed down, you have an airtight system with zero leaks. Then you hook up the fill attachment and open the ball valves. When the system reaches zero your system is filled. If you look in your radiator and notice it is not to the top, you may have to do this a second time. For this system I was able to do the whole bike in a single draw.
Here is what the system looks like and how easy it is to use:
















































__________________
Life is the last thing you experience before you die...living is what you do every day to get you to that point...
Dr E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2013, 10:23 PM   #14436
Ladder106
It's a short cut, really
 
Ladder106's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,800
Hang on Honey

Coming from that Hayabusa background has certainly tainted your judgement.

The back pad only has to be attached to the leading edge of the top case.


Sorry to disappoint, but here is no way the TA will accelerate hard enough to make the padding over the top necessary......even if Robin's spine is that flexible.




Oh....where'd'ja get the shiny tape?
Ladder106 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2013, 01:34 AM   #14437
Dr E
Chasing after theory
 
Dr E's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Oddometer: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Coming from that Hayabusa background has certainly tainted your judgement.

The back pad only has to be attached to the leading edge of the top case.

Sorry to disappoint, but here is no way the TA will accelerate hard enough to make the padding over the top necessary......even if Robin's spine is that flexible.

Oh....where'd'ja get the shiny tape?
Hahaha! I have not revealed my HP upgrades to this new speed demon. Can't have that thing flapping in the wind, may tear the fabric to pieces.

Now as for the shiny tape you ask...simple aluminum HVAC tape, not the fiber tape commonly used, but the expensive "top shelf ($7.99/roll)" solid metal tape that you find at Home Depot. Nothing but the best for this ride.
__________________
Life is the last thing you experience before you die...living is what you do every day to get you to that point...
Dr E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2013, 09:14 AM   #14438
Ladder106
It's a short cut, really
 
Ladder106's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,800
Engine heat doesn't make the tape fall off and burn on the engine?
Ladder106 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2013, 12:55 PM   #14439
Dr E
Chasing after theory
 
Dr E's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Oddometer: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Engine heat doesn't make the tape fall off and burn on the engine?
Nope. It really does wonders on a race bike in helping to keep temperatures down. My preference would have been my insulated metal tape, but I used that up on my last build and since we are not talking a large engine...this will work fine. If you go with the aluminized paper tape, there you could have peeling issues as I have seen that come off on peoples bikes...and that would burn.
__________________
Life is the last thing you experience before you die...living is what you do every day to get you to that point...
Dr E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2013, 02:18 PM   #14440
R_Rick
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Halifax, NS
Oddometer: 250
No posts for over a week ... time to get this thread back on the first page.

Waiting for "Spring' here in Nova Scotia. Just when things were looking good a few weeks ago we got hit with a storm that dropped 6 to 8" of the white stuff.

Put battery in the Alp last weekend and spent a few mins getting it to fire up. Shovelled a path from my shed to driveway and took her for a little spin. I rebuilt the caliper over winter and fitted a 50" ss brake line so took things easy so I can bed in the new pads (EBC HH). Hopefully get out again over the next few days.

Cheers

Rick
R_Rick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2013, 08:05 PM   #14441
DKCJ
Rather be riding...
 
DKCJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Oddometer: 4
Reunited: I have an '87 Transalp again...after 25 years!

In 1987, a buddy and I bought two new Transalps. We did all manner of things with them but sold them to buy pure off-road bikes.
I never forgot the fun and versatility of that TA so near the end of last summer I found a super mint one and am in love again with my old flame.
Below is an image of the bike when I bought it.


It came with Progressive springs and a taller aftermarket windshield.

I've put on Hidenau tires and a GPS and also have an SW-Motech skidplate, saddlebag rack, Givi bars, a power bus box, Oxford heated grips, a few other bits to install. Also need to get new fork gaitors, disassemble the rear linkage for a clean & lube, etc.

I could have had pretty much any ADV bike I wanted, new or used but absolutely love riding the Alp. Despite the age and 'lack of technology', this bike just works for what I want.
There is just something about it that transcends time.
__________________
Cheap, fast, or reliable.
Pick any two.
DKCJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2013, 10:51 PM   #14442
Belgian Waffles
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Green. Wet. Oregon.
Oddometer: 869
Awesome find DK, welcome to the forum.

Any of you tall guys ride with bar risers? I installed a set recently and the position is great, but it increased the leverage on the two handlebar bolts that go into the triple clamp such that the bars deflect in their annoying rubber mounts way too much when pushing the bike around in the garage, let alone when going on any semi-technical riding. Control isn't great to say the least. Not many complaints by comparison for road riding.

I know i read something a while back about clamping those rubber mounts with a certain size washer, so i'll go search for that again, but even if those stay put, its still too easy to bend the bolts and tweak the handlebar alignment because of that extra leverage. Anyone ever replaced these with beefier ones?

Had a nice 600 mile ride over two days to go visit my buddy at Whitman College in eastern Washington this week. Great scenery... And man this bike is smooth. What an engine. Pics once i get the film developed (assuming i didn't mess them all up).

J
__________________
Always chase your dreams. Even if you don't catch them, you'll have a hell of a time trying.

Current: 1989 Honda Transalp, 2006 Scorpa TY125F trials
Past: 1999 KLR 650, 1990 Tengai 650
Belgian Waffles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2013, 07:11 AM   #14443
Jim Rowley
Rise above
 
Jim Rowley's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: Black Forest, Colorado
Oddometer: 2,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgian Waffles View Post
Pics once i get the film developed (assuming i didn't mess them all up).

J
Embrace technology my young friend. Go digital.
__________________
Jim Rowley
Black Forest, CO
Jim Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2013, 08:18 AM   #14444
Ladder106
It's a short cut, really
 
Ladder106's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,800
Jim,

Don't you still have those aluminium cones for replacing the top triple clamp rubber bushings? I think J might want some.
Ladder106 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2013, 08:31 AM   #14445
Jim Rowley
Rise above
 
Jim Rowley's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: Black Forest, Colorado
Oddometer: 2,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Jim,

Don't you still have those aluminium cones for replacing the top triple clamp rubber bushings? I think J might want some.
Yes, I do. But I wanted J to develop the mechanical side of his engineering mind.
__________________
Jim Rowley
Black Forest, CO
Jim Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014