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Old 03-19-2013, 11:58 AM   #76
grelcar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NonDairyCreamer View Post
A question for any Road King owner, present or past.

I once owned a '92 FLHS, Electra Glide Sport Moco called it, Road King now. When cruising interstates, usually 80-85, I had the slightest bit of vibration in the front end which I thought was the wind pushing the windshield. It was very subtle. Is this something anyone has noticed on later models?

Also the motor vibration had my feet always slowly sliding off the floorboards, I always wanted to find some of the boot scrapers found on bikes from many years past to mount, like stirrups.

A great bike for exploring and touring though. I wonder now if a fork damper or just tightening up the yoke bearings would fix the first problem. Maybe for the other issue some boot magnets?
I have never noticed any vibration with my Road king other than at idle. I often cruise at 75-85 on the interstate. No vibration or buzzing in the footboards, seat or in the handlebars. I recently installed Progressive monotubes in the front forks that firmed up the front end eliminating nose dive issues, bottoming out and some noises I was getting in the front end.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:46 PM   #77
BigIron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I don't know about the 1800, but the 1500 Goldwing is VERY cheap to maintain if you do it yourself. .
Agreed. I've never had an 1800, but it would be hard to beat my 1500. 60k in three years and nothing more than oil, filters, and tires. All day comfortable, outstanding weather protection, and you can load it like a rented mule.

There'll always be somebody suggesting that a GW doesn't count because it's like driving an Accord. If it doesn't work for you, that's cool. But I'll say it again: You'll never ride more thann when you have a GW.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:07 PM   #78
Jimmy the Heater
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I have a 02 BMW 1200LT and it is on the chopping block for the same reason. Great bike to ride, and normal maintenance isn't that bad but damn I never want to pay for the servo brake service.

I test rode a '10 HD Ultra and if I was in the market for another touring bike that would be the one I'd get. (currently trying to sell the LT for a DS now tho) Only 2 downsides were the rubber mounted floorboards were too flimsy and my riding pants were getting toasted when I put my right foot down at lights. Other than that, perfect.

You think the LT can eat miles in comfort, it has nothing on the Ultra. Amazing machine.

Another thing to consider is when I did my last 2 bike tours about 90% of the bikes I saw out in the middle of nowhere touring were HD. A few Wings, a Strom or 2, some FJR's, and 1 other BMW is the only other type I saw. That has got to count for something.
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:47 AM   #79
basketcase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmy the Heater View Post
I have a 02 BMW 1200LT and it is on the chopping block for the same reason. Great bike to ride, and normal maintenance isn't that bad but damn I never want to pay for the servo brake service.

I test rode a '10 HD Ultra and if I was in the market for another touring bike that would be the one I'd get. (currently trying to sell the LT for a DS now tho) Only 2 downsides were the rubber mounted floorboards were too flimsy and my riding pants were getting toasted when I put my right foot down at lights. Other than that, perfect.

You think the LT can eat miles in comfort, it has nothing on the Ultra. Amazing machine.

Another thing to consider is when I did my last 2 bike tours about 90% of the bikes I saw out in the middle of nowhere touring were HD. A few Wings, a Strom or 2, some FJR's, and 1 other BMW is the only other type I saw. That has got to count for something.
Re, seeing the HD's in the middle of nowhere. I have heard this from others who have done long trips and so I've considered going to a Road King or an Ultra when I trade, but I am so familiar with the GL line of Hondas that the knowledge reservoir is something I've not yet been willing to relinquish.

Another snag for me is the notoriety factor of the Harley lineup. Perhaps it's different in other areas of the US (and the world), but in the south the Harley (any Harley) is high on the list for the bike thieves. I've stayed at motels where the Harley guys all have cables and chains inter-locked on their bikes to deter the thugs.

My old Wing, on the other hand, gets about as much notice as the family garbage cart sitting on the curb on Fridays. I just lock the steering column, throw the cover over it, and go to sleep without worry.
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:14 AM   #80
Kelvininin
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The Victory Vision has been the best touring bike I have ever owned. I have only had to maintenance items to deal with, tires, oil, and one belt. Oil changes are cheap, tires are tires, and the Belt can be changed on the side of the road. Victory says to change the belt every 30k. I go 50K. I do carry a spare belt just in case.

The Vision has excellent wind management, cruise, stereo, heated seats and grips, and is the most comfortable bike I have ever had the chance to ride. It handles very well. My only grip is, during slow parking lot maneuvers, two up, fully loaded, it can be a bear, but anything above 5 mph is fine.

I have had GWs and test road HD, and for me, nothing matched the comfort and handling of the Vision. Maintenance is super cheap to boot, and its easy to do.
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Old 03-20-2013, 06:55 PM   #81
StriderJim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
2 up touring bikes (not sport touring) are hard to come by. Only BMW, Honda, and Harley make them. .
Kawasaki makes a very fine touring bike called a Voyager. I have a friend who has one with 150,000 miles on it, and still running strong. It has a frame-mounted fairing, and lots of farkles, to compare with the 'Wing.

I ride a Harley Road Glide Ultra, which is the same bike as the ElectraGlide except that it (also) has a frame mounted fairing. Very comfortable and very good handling motorcycle. I've put 25,000 trouble-free miles on it in 18 months, and expect it to go for a very long time. Can be had for a little less than a new 'Wing.

Of all these bikes, the Harley is probably the easiest to service, though a 103 c.i. air-cooled engine requires a bit of commitment. It's not for everyone.
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Old 03-20-2013, 09:59 PM   #82
JerryH
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The Voyager XII was an excellent bike, but no longer available new. Most of them have high mileage on them now.

For a passenger, there is no better bike on the planet than a Goldwing. It is also smooth and quiet, which should suit someone coming from a BMW. Yes, it is a bit like a 2 wheeled car (though not an Accord, or Camry, the most boring cars in the world) but that is what it takes for long trips with a lot of luggage and a passenger. The 1800s handle very well. Only things I don't like about them are the chain cam drive (used to be belts) and the valves that have to be adjusted (the 1200 and 1500 has hydraulic valves). The ride is as close to an early '70s Cadillac as you are going to get.
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Old 03-21-2013, 03:28 AM   #83
StriderJim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
The Voyager XII was an excellent bike, but no longer available new. Most of them have high mileage on them now.
Hi Jerry,
If you're responding to my post about Kaw Voyagers, you're not up on current models. In 2009, Kawasaki introduced a new touring bike which whey call "Voyager", though it's very different from the old Voyager series.

http://www.kawasaki.com/Products/Pro...scid=28&id=723
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Old 03-21-2013, 03:45 AM   #84
boatpuller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DOGSROOT View Post
This here's excellent advice!

In addition, DO NOT go to a dealership; therin lies your problem.

Find a competent independant; it's cheaper, friendlier, and they will actively help you save $$$.

Also, you can remove the fairings yourself, and save circa $100 from having a mechanic do it.

It's folly to pay an expert to do monkeywork.

Do you dislike the bike, or just the fact that you're using the most expensive maintenance option possible?
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EXCELLENT question.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:23 AM   #85
boatpuller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nbsdave View Post
excellent, still curious-how do you do it?
engine braking on downshift or not? front brake only, speed kept under 60, tire pressure, slow acceleration?
I have never heard of 20000 miles on a rear and I want to do it too.
I too have gotten that kind of mileage on a rear tire on my 09 Road King, without trying.

Got over 13,000 miles on the OEM Dunlap tire. Still had lots of tread, but was prepping the bike for a 12,000 mile 4 Corners Tour ride (all 4 corners of the contential U.S. in under 21 days), and there was not enough tread left for that upcoming ride. Did not want to change tire on the road during a timed trip.

Replaced it with the Dunlap American Elite rear tire sold by a non-HD dealership. Rode it 18,000 miles, mostly highways, solo, but heavily loaded with enough gear for three cold weeks on the road, and basic camping equipment. There wasn't room for a passenger with all the gear. Lots of 80 to 90 mph miles, as this country has a lot of vast empty areas. There was still good tread on it, but there was another upcoming big trip....

Replaced that rear tire with another of the same, Dunlap American Elite. The OEM tire was now available at non-HD stores, but I had good luck with the prior that I kept with it. So far, only have 5,000 on it, but those were very heavily loaded, two up, pulling a one-wheel trailer with too much tongue weight. If that rear tire wanted to up and die, it would deserve to. But, no, it looks great, and I've got another 10,000 miles of trips planned this summer and have no intentions of changing the rear tire for them.

Most riding is highway, around town, and gentle back roads. The motorcycle is 800 pounds, plus my 190 plus all the crap I always have in the saddle bags, plus luggage. Don't race the bike, but don't baby it either. No burn outs, but do sometimes hit the rev limiter on hard acceleration. Have participated in Motor Officer class, so do know the bike's abilities and am not afraid to lean it. My chicken strips are quite respectable for a touring bike. Do drag the rear brake for slow speed stability, and aid the front brake in normal braking, aiming for 70/30 ratio.

Agree, that with these tires, I don't see the need for the dark side.
Note: The OEM Dunlaps felt a little more sure footed than the A.E. Dunlaps, but at a higher price. Both stick just fine and I'm happier with these than the Metzler's and the Avon's I used to run. Michelin now makes one for HD, and i might try it next time just to see how it works; like their car and truck tires.

Oh, tire PSI is around 42 all the time.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:37 AM   #86
boatpuller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NonDairyCreamer View Post
A question for any Road King owner, present or past.

I once owned a '92 FLHS, Electra Glide Sport Moco called it, Road King now. When cruising interstates, usually 80-85, I had the slightest bit of vibration in the front end which I thought was the wind pushing the windshield. It was very subtle. Is this something anyone has noticed on later models?

Also the motor vibration had my feet always slowly sliding off the floorboards, I always wanted to find some of the boot scrapers found on bikes from many years past to mount, like stirrups.

A great bike for exploring and touring though. I wonder now if a fork damper or just tightening up the yoke bearings would fix the first problem. Maybe for the other issue some boot magnets?
Can't speak for your 20 year old EGS, as it had different engine, transmission, frame, etc. than either of my late model Road Kings. But, none of your concerns happened in either my 07 or 09 Road Kings, and they are mostly stock. With cruise control on, I often ride only using one hand, or sometimes no hand if I have to adjust a glove. The rubber mounts do a wonderful job of keeping the engine's vibrations away from the motorcycle frame and the rider, so I have never felt my feet "vibrating off the boards."

You might want to find a renting dealer and try a new one for a day. I suspect that everything you liked about your old one will still be there, and most you didn't like will be gone. Even Harley haters are slowly admitting that today's Harley's are pretty nice.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:46 AM   #87
boatpuller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmy the Heater View Post
I have a 02 BMW 1200LT and it is on the chopping block for the same reason. Great bike to ride, and normal maintenance isn't that bad but damn I never want to pay for the servo brake service.

I test rode a '10 HD Ultra and if I was in the market for another touring bike that would be the one I'd get. (currently trying to sell the LT for a DS now tho) Only 2 downsides were the rubber mounted floorboards were too flimsy and my riding pants were getting toasted when I put my right foot down at lights. Other than that, perfect.

You think the LT can eat miles in comfort, it has nothing on the Ultra. Amazing machine.

Another thing to consider is when I did my last 2 bike tours about 90% of the bikes I saw out in the middle of nowhere touring were HD. A few Wings, a Strom or 2, some FJR's, and 1 other BMW is the only other type I saw. That has got to count for something.
Thank you for your fair, objective look at Harley. The 2010 you rode was the first year with a catalytic converter in the exhaust pipes, and most report they do get hot. Keep in mind the factory sends them out lean, which equals heat, to pass emissions requirements. You can thank the EPA for that. It is fairly easy and a few hundred dollars to correct that with the aftermarket. Runs cooler, removes pinging, and gives the engine more power.
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:11 AM   #88
boatpuller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basketcase View Post
Re, seeing the HD's in the middle of nowhere. I have heard this from others who have done long trips and so I've considered going to a Road King or an Ultra when I trade, but I am so familiar with the GL line of Hondas that the knowledge reservoir is something I've not yet been willing to relinquish.

Another snag for me is the notoriety factor of the Harley lineup. Perhaps it's different in other areas of the US (and the world), but in the south the Harley (any Harley) is high on the list for the bike thieves. I've stayed at motels where the Harley guys all have cables and chains inter-locked on their bikes to deter the thugs.

My old Wing, on the other hand, gets about as much notice as the family garbage cart sitting on the curb on Fridays. I just lock the steering column, throw the cover over it, and go to sleep without worry.
There is something liberating about having an item no one wants to steal.

A lot of HD riders over stress the "theft" thing. Maybe it is part of the image they want to foster, that "What I've got and spent too much for is so nice that everyone wants to steal it." Or, some HD owners have too much of their identity wrapped up in their motorcycle, poor souls, and the thought of having anyone mess with it shakes them on an emotional level.

Now that I'm typing this it will probably happen, but at all the hotels I've parked at, most without a cover, nothing has ever happened to my Harley's. I do lock the bags and ignition overnight, and the fork occasionally, and remove the overpriced GPS every time. But chain it up? No. And I've ridden in 46 states, tens of thousands of miles, and no idea how many hotels, all with no problems. (I use normal judgment about the hotel and surrounding neighborhood, avoiding areas that look suspicious, but frequently use inexpensive hotels. Try to park in well lit spots, and like to see the motorcycle from the rooms' window, but do the same when traveling in a truck or car.)

In fact, the only motorcycles I can recall seeing chained up were two sport touring bikes at a sleepily little hotel in rural VT. So, maybe we choose different kinds of hotels, or maybe I need to spend more time in the South.
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:15 AM   #89
NonDairyCreamer
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Grelcar and Boatpuller, thanks for your comments. I'll be renting a couple of FL models in the coming weeks.
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:22 AM   #90
Blakebird
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
For a passenger, there is no better bike on the planet than a Goldwing. It is also smooth and quiet, which should suit someone coming from a BMW. Yes, it is a bit like a 2 wheeled car (though not an Accord, or Camry, the most boring cars in the world) but that is what it takes for long trips with a lot of luggage and a passenger. The 1800s handle very well. Only things I don't like about them are the chain cam drive (used to be belts) and the valves that have to be adjusted (the 1200 and 1500 has hydraulic valves).
Valve adjustment intervals on the flat six are 32,000 miles, so it's about as close to a maintenance free system you'll find shy of hydraulic. They're quite easy to get to when the time comes too.

I owned a GL1800 and it was a terrific touring bike - almost cheating to do a Saddlesore 1000 on it compared to doing one on a Blackbird or an R1100S.

But, comfort is a subjective thing. My wife liked riding pillion on the Wing, but says the Guzzi Stelvio was much more comfortable for her 5', 115lb frame. Shape of the seat, seat-peg relationship, etc. She preferred the Stelvio to the Wing, ST1300, and FJR1300.

Of all the big touring rigs though, I will say that the big Wing is the sportiest one I've ridden, and can keep a sportbike guy entertained.
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