ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-21-2013, 02:24 AM   #61
Ceri JC
UK GSer
 
Ceri JC's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: All over, usually Wales or England
Oddometer: 2,462
Quote:
Originally Posted by assquatch20 View Post
My mom encouraged me to ride in groups as much as possible...
It's strange, this is a really common reaction and I've been on the receiving end too. It's a good example of a lay person's 'perception of risk' bearing no correlation to 'actual risk': Statistically you are a lot more likely to get hurt in a group ride than solo. The only difference is that you're more likely to have someone there to help if it goes wrong. If you're trailriding in the boondocks, I can see how a riding buddy makes it, in total, less dangerous.

On a highway with other traffic though? Unless your friend is a field medic and police-level rider, you're probably safer on your own and relying on the general public to ring and ambulance and stabilise you.
__________________
I like my bike because I can overtake 4x4s down farm tracks with a week's worth of shopping on the back.
Ceri JC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2013, 11:59 AM   #62
stoke
ocean minded
 
stoke's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, OB & LJ
Oddometer: 541
A lot of people have mentioned their parents negative reaction to them getting a motorcycle-thing is, they're a lot more safe than some alternatives. Which is weird because growing up my brothers and I weren't allowed a dirt bike, but something "safer".

Did anybody else grow up riding a three wheeler in the '80's before they stopped making them? My brothers and I used to tear around on one of those things and got in many wrecks. No gear, no helmets, no training. Thankfully, no permanent damage for any of us.

Just think it's funny there was this stigmatized perception among my parents that motorcycles were inherently dangerous, but 3 wheelers were not. Pretty much the most unstable design possible.
stoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 01:21 AM   #63
assquatch20
Hoss Cat
 
assquatch20's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Chattanooga
Oddometer: 1,089
Quote:
Originally Posted by stoke View Post
A lot of people have mentioned their parents negative reaction to them getting a motorcycle-thing is, they're a lot more safe than some alternatives. Which is weird because growing up my brothers and I weren't allowed a dirt bike, but something "safer".

Did anybody else grow up riding a three wheeler in the '80's before they stopped making them? My brothers and I used to tear around on one of those things and got in many wrecks. No gear, no helmets, no training. Thankfully, no permanent damage for any of us.

Just think it's funny there was this stigmatized perception among my parents that motorcycles were inherently dangerous, but 3 wheelers were not. Pretty much the most unstable design possible.
A family friend doesn't have the face she was born with because of the inherent design issues behind three wheelers. A lot of it probably lies in the false sense of security you get on quads and three wheelers.
__________________
Some things shouldn't be left like you found them.
assquatch20 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 10:08 AM   #64
stoke
ocean minded
 
stoke's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: San Diego, OB & LJ
Oddometer: 541
Quote:
Originally Posted by assquatch20 View Post
A family friend doesn't have the face she was born with because of the inherent design issues behind three wheelers. A lot of it probably lies in the false sense of security you get on quads and three wheelers.
Exactly. Quads too are super tippy in certain circumstances-ridden quads and six wheelers for years. People get really hurt on them because like you said, false sense of security and no one ever wears gear.

The only other thing we weren't allowed to own were snowmobiles. People always went too fast through fields and couldn't/didn't stop in time for barbed wire fences, which were usually right at neck level.
stoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 01:27 PM   #65
mattlikesbikes
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Oddometer: 193
I'm a pseudo first gen rider. My dad was a baja racer in southern California way before I was born (60's and 70's). By the time I had come along my mom had made him hang up his helmet (and his hang glider too, buzz kill).

I was a mountain biker before I got my first powered 2 wheels, a 150cc scooter. After a few thousand miles I finally man'd up with an F650GS. The hardest call I made was to tell my dad I bought a bike. At age 23 I told him I was considering a Ducati and he had threatened to come see me every six weeks to break another bone so I could never actually ride.

Fortunately he has observed that I have grown a lot since that first thought of a bike. He is still nervous but understands with a family of my own to come home to that I don't take risks when I can avoid them.
__________________
2009 F 650 GS - Lava Orange
mattlikesbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 06:18 PM   #66
pmacb
Junior
 
pmacb's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: The dark heart of the Vampire State.
Oddometer: 190
Strange how these things happen...

I grew up in a non-motorcycling household until my mother went to work as a bookkeeper for one of the European tour companies (the Mom and Pop one). Of course I ended up hanging out with one of the owner's sons who was a few years older than me and got the the bug (I drank the BMW kool-aide too). After all that exposure to "motorcycling people" Mom & Dad were accepting, if not enthusiastic about motorcycles.

I bought a Honda FT500 Ascot from a kid at college my last semester only to park it a couple of years later until my own kids had grown up and were mostly done with college themselves.

pmacb
__________________
I wanna help the helpless, but I dont give a rats ass about the clueless anymore... Dennis Miller

"When a carnie looks at you and shakes his toothless tattooed head in disgust, you know you've made some bad choices in life." WaterWheel
pmacb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 06:26 PM   #67
BillsburgGS
Gnarly Adventurer
 
BillsburgGS's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Glendale - St. Louis, MO
Oddometer: 302
First gen here, started at 44, other than having rented a scooter once 20 years before on an island vacation. My parents, friends, wife, etc. all gave me the "it's insanely dangerous" and I bought it.

I came home from work one Tuesday after learning of a 3rd friend/work associate had been diagnosed with cancer. Sitting on a lawn chair with a beer, I asked myself "what if I were next...what would I regret not having done or tried while I could of?" After dismissing 30 minutes with Heidi Klum as not really being an option, the only thing I could really think of was "riding a motorcycle". That was Tuesday night. That Friday night I started the MSF BRC, passed my road test that Monday, bought a used Shadow 750 that Friday which. Next year traded it for a Harley, and then two years later settled down to an F800gs and dual sport riding is my very favorite hobby.

One nice thing about starting later in life (6 years ago) is if you have the desire and adequate means, you haul ass and go for what you want.
BillsburgGS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2013, 09:29 PM   #68
BCJC
Adventurer
 
BCJC's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: Ukee
Oddometer: 49
entire family was dead set against bikes. no chance.

i distinctly remember my aunt, who was a nurse, saying she would break both my legs if i ever got a motorcycle. i was 8.
BCJC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2013, 03:35 AM   #69
Halen
Suerte O Muerte
 
Halen's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Houston .:. TX
Oddometer: 30
I was a true first generation rider in my family, motorcycles were considered foreign.

From a young age I always remember wanting to own a motorcycle. Being raised by a single mom, the luxury of owning a dirt bike at the age of 10 was out of the question. In high school I set out to save money and buy my first motorcycle. Upon graduation I picked up a brand new 1983 Kawasaki GPZ-550. It was that old school superbike style that really sucked me in. My first several months on this bike were quite an adventure.

Now 30 years later I look back over the years and am glad that the early passion led to a life long motorcycle odyssey.
Halen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014