ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool > Airheads
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-02-2013, 03:11 PM   #16
CanadaBiker
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Oddometer: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
You need the proper tool for removing the exhaust flange nut. When using the correct tool if it starts to feel stuck you should feel it and at that point cut the nut off. These threads are to be coated with anti-seize. Many recommend other brands. I use the Permatex, silver one.
I have the fin wrench, but it's the cast/aluminum-ish one. But maybe it'll still work fine. I also use anti-seize on almost everything. The silver stuff: # 133H.
__________________
2005 Suzuki DR650, 1987 BMW R80
CanadaBiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 08:03 PM   #17
bmwhacker
Still on 3 wheels
 
bmwhacker's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: MONTANA NATIVE from NATIVE MONTANA
Oddometer: 4,152
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBiker View Post
I have the fin wrench, but it's the cast/aluminum-ish one. But maybe it'll still work fine. I also use anti-seize on almost everything. The silver stuff: # 133H.
I've removed a LOT of them. I start shooting them with penetrating oil at least a week or so prior to removal attempt. Then use one of the big cast aluminum fin wrenches like you have. Haven't stripped one yet. Maybe just lucky.
__________________
http://555navigator.blogspot.com

Living proof you shouldn't play with matches
ABC# 1992
bmwhacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 11:27 PM   #18
Paul_Rochdale
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Paul_Rochdale's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Aylesford, Kent, UK
Oddometer: 150
Reading about all of these wrecked threads irritates me no end. Why don't riders read up about such things before butchering their bikes? There's endless posts about seized exhaust nuts both here and elsewhere, even videos on YouTube about how to remove them. I've two BeeEms and never had a problem with the exhaust threads. Slice the old ones off if seized, clean up the threads, Copaslip then fit new nuts. Simple.
Paul_Rochdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 11:32 PM   #19
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_Rochdale View Post
Reading about all of these wrecked threads irritates me no end. Why don't riders read up about such things before butchering their bikes? There's endless posts about seized exhaust nuts both here and elsewhere, even videos on YouTube about how to remove them. I've two BeeEms and never had a problem with the exhaust threads. Slice the old ones off if seized, clean up the threads, Copaslip then fit new nuts. Simple.
Some things are non-obvious and you don't go researching them. Many are not mechanics and hence are insensitive to a bad thread. if it doesn't come around every so often there isn't current nfo for the newbs to see. What you don't see is the people reading ,getting it right, never posting.

I remove, clean and lube the nuts at least once a year. no problems here either. letting a connection that gets that hot sit for years is unwise.

Accept your own frailties and that of others won't bug you so much.
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 12:30 AM   #20
disston
ShadeTreeExpert
 
disston's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Silver Spring, Md
Oddometer: 8,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_Rochdale View Post
Reading about all of these wrecked threads irritates me no end. Why don't riders read up about such things before butchering their bikes? There's endless posts about seized exhaust nuts both here and elsewhere, even videos on YouTube about how to remove them. I've two BeeEms and never had a problem with the exhaust threads. Slice the old ones off if seized, clean up the threads, Copaslip then fit new nuts. Simple.
Don't take it personal.
__________________
.
Never memorize something you can look up.
---Albert Einstein

Pay your debt, piratejohn.http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=949341
disston is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 12:38 AM   #21
isdt BMW
willserv@aol.com
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: N. E. Ohio
Oddometer: 232
exhaust threads

Paul Sturges in Bend Oregon welds and machines for a perfect repair. been using him for 25 years.
isdt BMW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:36 AM   #22
hensmen
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Oddometer: 152
Hallo GCCR, from Germany i have an alternative, not originalbut it is repaired in a minute and best for adv used bikes. Mean when you travel, i try to put the link:
http://www.sternmutterersatz.de/
Don`t know if it is worth shipping but for travelling the eaysiest way.
Hans from Germany
hensmen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:44 AM   #23
Plaka
Brevis illi vita est
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Oddometer: 4,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensmen View Post
Hallo GCCR, from Germany i have an alternative, not originalbut it is repaired in a minute and best for adv used bikes. Mean when you travel, i try to put the link:
http://www.sternmutterersatz.de/
Don`t know if it is worth shipping but for travelling the eaysiest way.
Hans from Germany
There's a 24 letter word on that page!

http://www.sternmutterersatz.de/inde...ust-nut-repair
Plaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:53 AM   #24
Paul_Rochdale
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Paul_Rochdale's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Aylesford, Kent, UK
Oddometer: 150
"Some things are non-obvious and you don't go researching them. Many are not mechanics and hence are insensitive to a bad thread. if it doesn't come around every so often there isn't current nfo for the newbs to see".

They are obvious when the nuts are seized on. They should be saying to themselves "Hey, this ain't right. Let's ask someone or lets read up about it". Don't just go hammering away or heaving on the correct spanner until damage is done. It's their time and money that's getting wasted not mine.

And what "frailties" would that be?
Paul_Rochdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 03:48 AM   #25
hensmen
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2010
Oddometer: 152
Sorry Plaka, i don`t know what you mean.
On my picture can you see how this functiones. You have two halfcircles and one ring and you connect the halfcircles on the cylinder and the ringover it.
Connected all with four normal screws and fits to the worsest" exhaust-damage".
Have it on my winterhack since years and it is great.
Hans
hensmen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 04:07 AM   #26
Jim Day
full manic mechanic
 
Jim Day's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: So. Cal.
Oddometer: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_Rochdale View Post
... don't riders read up about such things before butchering their bikes? There's endless posts about seized exhaust nuts both here and elsewhere.....I've two BeeEms and never had a problem with the exhaust threads. Slice the old ones off if seized, clean up the threads, Copaslip then fit new nuts. Simple.

The OPs bike predates the internet by decades and from the looks of it was probably damaged long before he ever bought it.

Take a look at the pics that's probably not stripped threads you're looking at but broken loose high temp epoxy. If he cut the nut off it would probably look exactly the same.

Ultimately with any mechanical device certain problems come up, and the possible mechanical mistakes or issues involved can in fact get repeated over and over by isolated people all over the world.

I'm a new poster here but a veteran poster on other boards with other mechanical discussions.

The web is a great resource, so are these boards.

People can come here and figure out how things are done from looking at the past experiences of others, but you can't expect everyone to know what has been posted before, or essentially the boards status quo.

It's easy to say: "Why don't these people know this" when they post something that seems to have an obvious answer, but I like to keep in mind that even if it's something I've talked about a million times it is new to them.

Jim Day screwed with this post 04-03-2013 at 05:58 AM
Jim Day is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 04:28 AM   #27
Jim Day
full manic mechanic
 
Jim Day's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: So. Cal.
Oddometer: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
The best repair does seem to be welding new Aluminum and then cutting new threads on the head. This is a really big thread and the die for cutting it is probably not too common. I see the die for sale on Ebay sometimes and it is a $100...
I'd love to have one of those. Welding the metal on is easy, getting that die might be more difficult. It would be hard to justify the expense for something I'd hardly ever use but it would be nice to have around. If you ever see one at that price again PM me.

Anyone know the exact specifications for the the threads?
Jim Day is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 05:27 AM   #28
CanadaBiker
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Oddometer: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Day View Post
I'd love to have one of those. Welding the metal on is easy, getting that die might be more difficult. It would be hard to justify the expense for something I'd hardly ever use but it would be nice to have around. If you ever see one at that price again PM me.

Anyone know the exact specifications for the the threads?
could you get a pal at a machine shop to turn the threads on a lathe and then weld the nipples on after? Heck, I turned threads on a lathe in grade 10 shop class.
__________________
2005 Suzuki DR650, 1987 BMW R80
CanadaBiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 05:52 AM   #29
Jim Day
full manic mechanic
 
Jim Day's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: So. Cal.
Oddometer: 638
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBiker View Post
could you get a pal at a machine shop to turn the threads on a lathe and then weld the nipples on after? Heck, I turned threads on a lathe in grade 10 shop class.
Yes I think it could be done that way.

If you go the welding route (I can weld)

One way would be to weld material directly on it, build up a surface then cut the threads with a die specifically made for it, but you'd have to get your hands on a die.

Another way would be to machine the threaded portion cut it back then tig weld the threaded portion in place.

Of the two that sounds more drastic but really it's not. Building up the surface is less technical but it puts a lot more heat into the head do to a longer welding time and more heat transfer. If I was going to do that I'd Mig it with a spool gun, which is faster with less heat exchange.

I know it's designed to take a lot of heat but when working with aluminum I'm always concerned about heat transfer and potential warpage.

Tigging a threaded portion on would put less heat into the head, migging it would put even less, and I'd say it's a good option. That's why I asked if anyone had the exact specifications of the threads.

If someone could get me a section of properly threaded tubing with the right ID, I could have that welded in place and completely repaired in an hour.
Jim Day is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 07:37 AM   #30
Stan_R80/7
Beastly Gnarly
 
Stan_R80/7's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: VA
Oddometer: 1,127
The exhaust threads on one of my spare /5 heads are are M52x2. The thread dimensions can be calculated using a Machinery's handbook and there are some web pages with this dimensional information. I always wondered how to make a jig for the head to single point thread the exhaust threads in a lathe? I expect someone has figured out a way. I have seen dies for sale on Ebay from Germany for ~$100.00 + shipping.

Maybe an easier solution is to get a piece of 6061-T6 extruded rod, bore a hole ~39mm in diameter, single point thread the OD to make a threaded nipple, and then cut off the damaged threads on the head and TIG weld on the nipple? The welding raised portion of the new exhaust nipple ID could be line bored in a milling machine or hand filed smooth. Maybe one day I will try this with one of my spare heads, but my TIG welding has to improve first.

Stan_R80/7 screwed with this post 04-03-2013 at 04:16 PM Reason: Edit: the exhaust ID is 39mm (for the < 1000 cc heads)
Stan_R80/7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014