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Old 06-19-2011, 03:26 PM   #16
L.B.S. OP
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Cheers, thanks for more info on the subject, guys!
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Old 06-20-2011, 05:19 AM   #17
kirb
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I have never really got into Guzzi's until the CARC versions came out, Griso to be specific. They really updated the bikes to be close enough to the rest of the world out there, but still Guzzi.

The bikes have some quirks that are really easy to live with. With that, you get some very well built machines. I would stay away from the first model years of any one model (early Grisos, early 8V machines) unless you can prove the recalls or TSBs were done.

I then would go oneline and find a used model of what you are seaking and save a boat load of cash. Example- buy an 1100 griso for $6.5k instead of 12k+ off the floor ( I picked up an '07 for $6k with 2400 miles on it). Buy a 1200 8V griso for $9k instead of $13k off the floor. Be aware the Griso has a short distance between the seat and pegs (knee ache)

For your request in riding styles...I would go with a Stelivo. Same frame as the Griso, but the seat is much higher (inseam!) and easy to ride long distance. These will be a bit tougher to find used, but there are models still on the floor around the country. Personally, I would wait for the NTX to come out with the massive fuel tank if you were going to buy off the floor. You will also have to get used to the looks you will get at the gas pump from those GS guys who somehow found a bike that looks even more odd than the one they are riding.
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Old 06-20-2011, 06:16 AM   #18
Graemsay
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My brother test rode a Norge at the weekend, and posted his thoughts up about the bike on Kevin Ash's forum.

The short version is that he loved the bike, thought it handled far better and went somewhat quicker than he was expecting for a full-fat tourer. That, and the engine sounded like it was being propelled by dwarves smiting the pistons with hammers. In a good way.

(I can attest about the soundtrack. One of my neighbours has a Stelvio, and with the stock pipes it's rather epic.)

Within fifteen minutes of coming back he'd agreed to buy a green Griso SE like the one in the photo that's for sale in Seattle.

That's the bike you really want to buy.

If you want professional reviews, then Ash tested both the Stelvio and Norge recently.

I've heard that build quality on the new bikes is good, and the finish on them looks great, but they require a little debugging when new.
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Old 06-20-2011, 06:17 AM   #19
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My Dad is a huge Guzzi fan, I'm unconvinced. It's really about how you use the bike IMHO. I have three bikes and no car. If I want to go to work something has to run and be legal. When something needs fixing or servicing it has to be done to a schedule that accounts for this. My dad runs his Guzzi as a plaything. The fact that no one actually seems to be able to identify what the model year is (it's a Nevada, so bits have probably been hanging about for years) is a major problem and three attempts to get the right brake disks at 4 weeks a go after we'd had to remove the old ones with a grinder meant 13 weeks off the road for something I could have sorted on a BMW or Triumph in hours. He had swollen O-rings in the fuel system, the dealer was talking weeks but we bought Yamaha parts over the counter from our local mechanic the same day.

These are hand made bikes from a company that changes parts weekly and whose dealers seem to have no urgency about them and expect you to just accept that your work of art might not always be running. If you can live with this I think they are great bikes, if you need a bike that will be running 50 weeks a year I think you need to buy from a bigger manufacturer.

Andy
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Old 06-20-2011, 11:56 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
My Dad is a huge Guzzi fan, I'm unconvinced. It's really about how you use the bike IMHO. I have three bikes and no car. If I want to go to work something has to run and be legal. When something needs fixing or servicing it has to be done to a schedule that accounts for this. My dad runs his Guzzi as a plaything. The fact that no one actually seems to be able to identify what the model year is (it's a Nevada, so bits have probably been hanging about for years) is a major problem and three attempts to get the right brake disks at 4 weeks a go after we'd had to remove the old ones with a grinder meant 13 weeks off the road for something I could have sorted on a BMW or Triumph in hours. He had swollen O-rings in the fuel system, the dealer was talking weeks but we bought Yamaha parts over the counter from our local mechanic the same day.

These are hand made bikes from a company that changes parts weekly and whose dealers seem to have no urgency about them and expect you to just accept that your work of art might not always be running. If you can live with this I think they are great bikes, if you need a bike that will be running 50 weeks a year I think you need to buy from a bigger manufacturer.

Andy
5 minutes online with the serial number will tell you what year the bike is. A phone call to MG Cycles or MPH or Moto Int'l could have had your father's brake disc shipped overnight. Guzzi doesn't change parts weekly. The same goddamned oil pressure sensor that has sucked since the V11 is mounted on my 2008 1200 Sport. Stuff like oil filters are shared by models for years and years so many of the consumables are really inexpensive and available from multiple sources. One call to MG Cycles and 19 dollars later, my oil pressure sensor was fixed.

Once a Guzzi has been sorted, it is every bit as reliable as any other well built bike.
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Old 04-06-2013, 09:12 PM   #21
TexRivers
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Moto Guzzi EV TouringS

I have owned Hondas, Harley's, BMWs a KLR and two MGs. The Guzzis were by far my favorite.

If you have a good dealer nearby, we have a super one in Houston, they are outstanding bikes and extremely reliable.

The only thing I considered quirky on my 04 EV Touring was the foot brake pedal which I replaced with a more traditional after market design. I have put 20,000 miles on mine with zero problems.
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Old 04-06-2013, 09:51 PM   #22
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I recently acquired a 2007 Brevia 1100 with 90 miles on it. Like others have said, these bikes are a hoot - my Breva feels like a 350 compared to my also beloved FJR, and has character that gives me a s**t eating grin every time I ride it.
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:02 PM   #23
JerryH
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I took a long look at the V7 Stone. Gorgeous. Never ridden one. Most say the older ons from the '70s, like the Eldorado were good solid machines, but the newer ones have problems. Remember Moto Guzzi has been through several owners, so it is not the same company it was a few decades ago.
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:43 PM   #24
L.B.S. OP
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Ha! I'm not a big thread starter, so when I come across a thread that has me as the OP, most often it's: "Ahroo?" because I've forgotten all about it

In the end, the introduction of the Honda NC700X was eerily perfect in it's timing, and I am the extremely happy owner of a 2012 700X

While it isn't aircooled, the valve adjustment is screw and locknut, it's a twin, the sparkplugs are located below the front of the valve cover, so they don't have to be removed to check the valves. Very user friendly maintenance that I can do myself in the backyard, no *#&%%^ bloody BMW dealer computer need apply.

An interesting aside, the valve cover only needs three bolts to hold it on. And yet doesn't spew oil out of it like my Exxon Valdez F800 did...

The 270 crank ends up having the bike sound so very much like my old V-twin Turbo, it's spooky. (and I love it!)

It's missing the shaft drive that I had kinda wanted, but in the end the chain ended up being for the best because I went to more of a backroad/gravel focus than a sport tourer. Now I can at least change up the gearing if I want, and also have a better chance to effect repairs if needed, way out in the boonies.

Thanks for all the replies on the original topic though, guys.
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Old 04-08-2013, 04:54 AM   #25
rocker59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
My Dad is a huge Guzzi fan, I'm unconvinced. It's really about how you use the bike IMHO. I have three bikes and no car. If I want to go to work something has to run and be legal. When something needs fixing or servicing it has to be done to a schedule that accounts for this. My dad runs his Guzzi as a plaything. The fact that no one actually seems to be able to identify what the model year is (it's a Nevada, so bits have probably been hanging about for years) is a major problem and three attempts to get the right brake disks at 4 weeks a go after we'd had to remove the old ones with a grinder meant 13 weeks off the road for something I could have sorted on a BMW or Triumph in hours. He had swollen O-rings in the fuel system, the dealer was talking weeks but we bought Yamaha parts over the counter from our local mechanic the same day.

Sounds like a dealer problem and not a bike problem. If it's a '98-up bike, then it uses a common 320 mm Brembo front rotor that is common to Ducatis, Aprilias, and Guzzis. Getting a replacement is not big issue.

Guzzis are most definitely not "playthings". Attend any Guzzi event and the numbers on the odometers will confirm it.

Tenth digit in the VIN will tell you what year model the bike is. It's not rocket surgery.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
These are hand made bikes from a company that changes parts weekly and whose dealers seem to have no urgency about them and expect you to just accept that your work of art might not always be running. If you can live with this I think they are great bikes, if you need a bike that will be running 50 weeks a year I think you need to buy from a bigger manufacturer.

Andy


Come on! Really? Guzzis have long model runs and bikes share parts. Guzzi buys many cycle parts from vendors which supply the same parts to other Italian firms. Brakes are off-the-shelf Brembo.
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Old 04-08-2013, 05:02 AM   #26
rocker59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryH View Post
I took a long look at the V7 Stone. Gorgeous. Never ridden one. Most say the older ones from the '70s, like the Eldorado were good solid machines, but the newer ones have problems. Remember Moto Guzzi has been through several owners, so it is not the same company it was a few decades ago.
Guzzi has been owned by Piaggio since 2004. Piaggio has pumped Millions of Euros into the facility at Mandello del Lario, and shares a lot of development of its brands at Pontedera.

You admit that you know little of the brand, yet you throw out some meaningless anecdote.

The current V7 line are very solid motorcycles.
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Old 04-08-2013, 05:20 AM   #27
Blue&Yellow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocker59 View Post
Guzzi has been owned by Piaggio since 2004. Piaggio has pumped Millions of Euros into the facility at Mandello del Lario, and shares a lot of development of its brands at Pontedera.

You admit that you know little of the brand, yet you throw out some meaningless anecdote.

The current V7 line are very solid motorcycles.
Quite - I don't think Guzzis ever have been as good as they are today! I just hope that people actually buy some bikes now! It takes a long time to build brand recognition and the dealer network isn't the best. Where I live Guzzis are now sold in the same shops that sell Harley... and with a pretty hefty markup to boot. Not exactly my dream scenario....
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Old 04-08-2013, 06:34 AM   #28
DesmoDog
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Originally Posted by L.B.S. View Post
... the valve adjustment is screw and locknut, it's a twin, the sparkplugs are located below the front of the valve cover, so they don't have to be removed to check the valves.

Removing the sparkplug makes the list of hassles involved with checking the valves on some brands?

I've been playing with Ducatis for too long...
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:04 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by DesmoDog View Post
Removing the sparkplug makes the list of hassles involved with checking the valves on some brands?

I've been playing with Ducatis for too long...
For me, it is if your bike is a BMW F800ST...

Getting all the bodywork off, removing the battery and airbox, undoing a half gazillion wires/tubes/cables, trying to get the thrice damned coil on cap doohickies off without breaking them ($$$) etc., etc., etc.

Yeeeuck. Not for me, who has no special tools, no garage or place to work, no electrical outlet anywhere near and so on.

To add insult to injury, the stupid valve cover gasket and bolt O-rings don't even keep the oil in from the factory, and having to buy the whole near $100.00 dollar gasket "kit" (c/w new bolts!) if you just check the clearances, well that was one more thing that made me kick the hateful thing to the curb.

The NCX is absolutely awesome for user friendly maintenance under the worst of conditions. The valve cover only needs three bolts to hold it on and glory be, it's reusable forever (or if you do need to buy a new one, it's dirt cheap and able to be bought on it's own) and *gasp* it actually keeps the oil in the engine! What a concept!!

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