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Old 04-19-2013, 04:09 AM   #136
Tripped1
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Originally Posted by klaviator View Post
Maybe where you come from all the sport bike riders out there are really fast. I have ridden in around 40 out of 50 states and I have yet to find a place where most of the riders where really fast. Anyone out there know an area where most of the riders are competent and fast???

I know just the place. Its called "the track" I don't push as hard on the street EVER as I do the first lap on new tires at the track.

I don't really care about my license, I care about survival and I assure you if you even think about approaching any sort of limit with a super sport of any size built within the last 15 years or so you are in to fatal territory.

Its not the fall that kills you, its the sudden stop at the end.
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Old 04-19-2013, 04:39 AM   #137
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I don't know if anyone here has said this. I think the problem is that you're making a different point in each of your posts, so it's hard for us to really even discuss this with you. I think I'm now understanding what you're saying... But some of your posts directly contradict each other, so I'm honestly not sure.

By the way, I'm an example of a guy on a sport bike that goes so slow anyone could pass them. I could pass me if I wanted to. However, I don't like tickets or crashing, so I generally go about the speed limit, maybe five or ten over.

Bragging about who's fastest on the street is stupid. It all comes down to who is comfortable taking the biggest risk.
You are probably right about me trying to make too many points. I'll boil it down to this:

On the street, speed is mainly determined by how fast the rider is willing or able to go, not the bike. No one should be surprised when a rider on a "slow" bike goes faster than a rider on a "fast" bike.

I responded to this thread because so many people were shocked that a rider on a GS would even attempt to keep up with sport bikes. I haven't commented on the OP's original post because I wasn't there and really don't know what the situation was. I'm not sure why the OP thought it was such a big deal that he could briefly keep up with "sport bikes", especially if they were stretched out Hayabusa's.
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Old 04-19-2013, 04:47 AM   #138
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Originally Posted by Tripped1 View Post
I know just the place. Its called "the track" I don't push as hard on the street EVER as I do the first lap on new tires at the track.

I don't really care about my license, I care about survival and I assure you if you even think about approaching any sort of limit with a super sport of any size built within the last 15 years or so you are in to fatal territory.

Its not the fall that kills you, its the sudden stop at the end.


Exactly!
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Old 04-19-2013, 05:11 AM   #139
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I think that how fast someone rides on the street is determined by a combination of rider skill, how close to the edge he is willing to push it (90%, 70%, etc), how well he knows the roads, and how much he is willing to exceed the posted limits. As for the bike itself, how comfortable the rider is with the bike is probably more important than the outright limits of the bikes performance. There are always people discussing which bike "should" be faster when it is often irrelevant on most public roads.

I am talking about bikes with reasonably high performance limits here. Obviously there are some bikes which will limit speed even on public roads if they have limited cornering clearance or very limited power.
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Old 04-19-2013, 06:51 AM   #140
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Originally Posted by Tripped1 View Post

I don't really care about my license, I care about survival and I assure you if you even think about approaching any sort of limit with a super sport of any size built within the last 15 years or so you are in to fatal territory.

Its not the fall that kills you, its the sudden stop at the end.
That would go for most public roads as well w/o the speed. Stupidity kills far more riders than speed alone. And there's stupid on both sides of the equation.
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Old 04-19-2013, 06:57 AM   #141
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Originally Posted by Mr_Gone View Post
The brake is the thingamabob and the clutch is the thingamajig. Totally different. Besides, it's just like riding a bike....
Doh!!! I've had it backwards all this time.
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Old 04-19-2013, 07:07 AM   #142
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Originally Posted by klaviator View Post

I can't believe that all the "experts" who have posted on this thread have never witnessed guys on sport bikes (and other bikes) that were going so slow that any competent rider couldn't pass them. Maybe where you come from all the sport bike riders out there are really fast. I have ridden in around 40 out of 50 states and I have yet to find a place where most of the riders where really fast. Anyone out there know an area where most of the riders are competent and fast???
Where I come from half the riders I see aren't FROM here. No one's disputing the fact that most riders aren't competent or fast regardless of what they're riding. I rarely see them myself. I've blown by slow ass adv/DS riders as often as I've blown by slow ass sport bike riders. Of course those numbers don't compare at all to how many slow ass cruiser riders I've blown buy, but then they outnumber all the other riders combined 20 to 1.

I'm just stating that I am competent enough to ride a faster machine faster, and that pretty much applies to the small group of sport bike riders that I ride with as well. Just because you can't doesn't mean that no one else can
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:41 AM   #143
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However, in my experience, a large percentage of the sportbike rider's out there are wasting their money because they haven't a clue what to do when the road turns twisty. I have passed some sportbikes on 129 and 28 while riding a 150cc scooter with limited cornering clearance. Obviously it's not because I was going real fast.
I tend to agree with the first part of your post. I do believe many "kids" buy sport bikes for looks and "cool" factor (i.e. posers).

However, the fact that you have "passed some sport bikes on 129 on your 150cc scooter with limited cornering clearance" doesn't mean that those riders don't know how to ride. 129 is a public road with extremely limited visibility and crap load of traffic and cops (for a good reason). My first time on the dragon, I was quite nervous (limited viz) and was taking it slow (on my Ducati 848). After two days and few runs, I was able to memorize most of those turns and felt quite comfortable and didn't have a problem riding at a spirited pace.

My point is that you know this road like the back of your hand and know what to expect which gives you a great advantage over someone like me who has never been to the dragon before.
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Old 04-19-2013, 09:51 AM   #144
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Originally Posted by Cerberus83 View Post
I tend to agree with the first part of your post. I do believe many "kids" buy sport bikes for looks and "cool" factor (i.e. posers).

However, the fact that you have "passed some sport bikes on 129 on your 150cc scooter with limited cornering clearance" doesn't mean that those riders don't know how to ride. 129 is a public road with extremely limited visibility and crap load of traffic and cops (for a good reason). My first time on the dragon, I was quite nervous (limited viz) and was taking it slow (on my Ducati 848). After two days and few runs, I was able to memorize most of those turns and felt quite comfortable and didn't have a problem riding at a spirited pace.

My point is that you know this road like the back of your hand and know what to expect which gives you a great advantage over someone like me who has never been to the dragon before.
I agree 100%. One time I was riding my scooter on 129 and saw some headlights behind me. I picked up my pace and pulled away. When I got to the Deal's Gap I stopped and along came a rider on an S1000rr. His tires where feathered to the edges from a recent track day. Obviously he could have caught me but chose not to. I have no illusions of being faster than him.

A passed a couple on 600cc sportbikes that had never ridden Deal's Gap before. They appeared to be smooth and competent riders but were smart enough not to push the pace:

On the other hand I have also seen guys riding so slow they wobbled around the corners. Or they go fast on the straights and practically stop in the curves. In those cases it's lack of skill.

BTW, when a faster rider does catch up to me, I slide over and let him by.
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:05 PM   #145
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Originally Posted by klaviator View Post
I think that how fast someone rides on the street is determined by a combination of rider skill, how close to the edge he is willing to push it (90%, 70%, etc), how well he knows the roads, and how much he is willing to exceed the posted limits. As for the bike itself, how comfortable the rider is with the bike is probably more important than the outright limits of the bikes performance. There are always people discussing which bike "should" be faster when it is often irrelevant on most public roads.

I am talking about bikes with reasonably high performance limits here. Obviously there are some bikes which will limit speed even on public roads if they have limited cornering clearance or very limited power.
Of all that said your missing one valuable point, what about the other guy? To even considering rider skill and the ability to push a bike to its upper limits is absurd on the road. The variables are so much different that there is no comparison
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Old 04-19-2013, 01:16 PM   #146
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I would like to get in on this thread late, not read anything but the first post, make some derogatory comments, imply my riding skill and situational awareness is higher, suggest a better way of dealing with it, and reprimand the poster for not having a gremlin bell on his bike - how would I go about doing that?
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Old 04-19-2013, 02:40 PM   #147
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I would like to get in on this thread late, not read anything but the first post, make some derogatory comments, imply my riding skill and situational awareness is higher, suggest a better way of dealing with it, and reprimand the poster for not having a gremlin bell on his bike - how would I go about doing that?

The best way to start is with what kind of oil he uses.
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Old 04-19-2013, 03:53 PM   #148
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The best way to start is with what kind of oil he uses.
Second-ed.

This needs to be an oil thread.
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Old 04-19-2013, 06:25 PM   #149
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I would like to get in on this thread late, not read anything but the first post, make some derogatory comments, imply my riding skill and situational awareness is higher, suggest a better way of dealing with it, and reprimand the poster for not having a gremlin bell on his bike - how would I go about doing that?
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Old 04-19-2013, 06:50 PM   #150
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