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Old 04-19-2013, 03:05 PM   #91
JagLite OP
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Cool2 Side cover cover/protectors

How I made the case protectors for the Tracker. A simple project?
I am sure there are other ways to do this and I am NOT saying this is the best way.
Just that this is how I did it.

First, remove engine and tape over the sides with wide plastic clear tape (the resin won't stick to it)







Oh, OK, engine removal is optional

Then you want to wax the tape with car (polish) wax to make absolutely sure the resin won't stick to the engine.
It is usually recommended to do the waxing three times when using a mold.
Cover well beyond the area you are going to glass so no resin runs down onto the engine.

Now cut the fiberglass cloth, mat, and roving to oversize multiple layers.
Decide on the layup you want to use and the end thickness you desire.
I used 3 layers of 6 ounce cloth and then 3 layers of 24 ounce roving.
I covered it finally with one layer of a polyester fabric that is similar to Kevlar for abrasion resistance.

Once I had the layers cut and stacked in reverse order I mixed up the resin for the first batch.
I used epoxy resin from System Three but there are many very good epoxies available and regular polyester resin would work fine also, it just stinks, but it is less expensive and you can regulate the speed of curing by varying the catalyst amount.
Epoxy has one ratio it must be mixed at.
That ratio varies by manufacturer.

While you could lay up all layers on the engine mold, I prefer to just put the three layers of cloth on first and let them harden up.
I then remove the shell from the mold (the engine in this case) and trim them up.
Then I mix up more resin and start laying on the roving that gives the part the real strength.
The cloth is very thin and has no real strength but it shapes easily around the curves and holds together unlike roving which does not make sharp bends and will come apart.
I don't use mat as it has a binder that holds it together that does not work with epoxy resins.

I also mixed black tint in every batch of epoxy so that it is colored all the way through.
That way as the surface gets abraded by my boots, it will not show a different color.

So, parts drying with extra heat. First layers:





After pulling the covers off I trimmed the edges with a Dremel tool cut-off wheel and did a quick light sanding to smooth any irregularities.
Then mixed up the next batch of epoxy, added the tint, and using a brush to wet out the cloth I added all the roving and the final abrasion fabric.



I always try to catch the resin when it is at the stage that it is hard but not fully hardened.
Once it hardens enough I can use a utility knife to cut the overhang, or excess material away.
That is easier and less messy than cutting it after it is fully hardened.



Then to sand again and final trimming with the Dremel tool.
Next I mixed up filler, tinted it, and covered the whole cover.
The secret for me to work with fiberglass (hate it!) is to do as little sanding of the glass as possible so I cover it with filler and sand the filler to shape.



Again I put them in front of my convenient garage project heater to speed up the epoxy set time.



For appearance I decided to build up areas to be able to make the edges sharper rather than rounded.
The Duct Tape acts as a dam to contain the filler.
No, it doesn't end up being that thick.



Then lots of sanding to get it nice a smooth and shaped the way you want.






After it was shaped OK I put on the last coat of tinted epoxy.



After putting them on the bike and looking I decided to sand them for a dull black "sand cast" look since I didn't care for the shiny black.

For the Tracker I wanted to cover the entire side case for protection but mostly to disguise the shape of the engine.
You can make covers this way to cover as much or as little as you want.

Again, the end result:



I have ProCycle SS side covers on my other DR and they are great!
For what they cover. They don't cover the oil filter though, nor the entire clutch area. Much better than nothing!
And easy to buy and glue on.

I may make some more of these for the other DR, but I hate working with glass so I am in no hurry to do it.

I finished up by getting adhesive back Industrial Strength Velcro to hold the covers on.
The Velcro will also provide some give when there is an impact against the side case cover.

The layup I used of 3x cloth, 3x roving, 1x abrasion fabric came out to about 1/4" thick not counting the varying thickness of filler.
It is very strong and very stiff yet epoxy doesn't crack like polyester resin does.

This is not a very difficult project if you have experience working with fiberglass, or better yet, you have a friend who has experience...

If you haven't worked with it, this could be a fun learning experience but you will need much more detailed instructions than I have posted here.
Like everything, the less you know about it, the easier it seems it will be.

Any questions?
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Old 04-19-2013, 04:27 PM   #92
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Great post and process. thanks
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Old 04-19-2013, 04:57 PM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
Like everything, the less you know about it, the easier it seems it will be.
You certainly make it all look easy! Very nicely done, and a great write-up, too.

+1 on West System epoxy. IIRC, it is one of two brands of epoxy that have pumps that you can use to meter the two components, which is a lot simpler than trying to weigh out precise measurements like you need to do with most other brands While sensitivity to both resins and glass dust varies with individuals, I've never really minded working with it. Even better, I've always thought the material itself was pretty straightforward to work with, at least in my (limited) experience. Unlike metal work, for example, if you mess up with fiberglass, it's pretty simple to sand it down and try again (especially if you are building up over foam plugs or molds, as they can be sanded down and reworked, too).

Regardless, I really like the engine protectors on your build. I had never thought of doing anything like that. Out of curiosity, how well do you think they will hold up to the heat of the running engine? I was under the impression that room temperature cure epoxies/polyesters/vinylesters weren't particularly tolerant of high temps, and while that part of the engine should be much cooler than the exhaust manifold or cylinder heads, I would still think it might get hot enough to at least soften the epoxy some.
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Old 04-19-2013, 07:14 PM   #94
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Question Take the heat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWall View Post
You certainly make it all look easy! Very nicely done, and a great write-up, too.

+1 on West System epoxy. IIRC, it is one of two brands of epoxy that have pumps that you can use to meter the two components, which is a lot simpler than trying to weigh out precise measurements like you need to do with most other brands While sensitivity to both resins and glass dust varies with individuals, I've never really minded working with it. Even better, I've always thought the material itself was pretty straightforward to work with, at least in my (limited) experience. Unlike metal work, for example, if you mess up with fiberglass, it's pretty simple to sand it down and try again (especially if you are building up over foam plugs or molds, as they can be sanded down and reworked, too).

Regardless, I really like the engine protectors on your build. I had never thought of doing anything like that. Out of curiosity, how well do you think they will hold up to the heat of the running engine? I was under the impression that room temperature cure epoxies/polyesters/vinylesters weren't particularly tolerant of high temps, and while that part of the engine should be much cooler than the exhaust manifold or cylinder heads, I would still think it might get hot enough to at least soften the epoxy some.
Thanks!

I used WEST System exclusively for years building my sailboat but the local fiberglass supplier gave a much better price on System Three products and I find it as easy to work with and easier to mix due to the 2:1 mix ratio.
I have never weighed my mixing, I use measuring spoons for tiny batches and measuring cups for larger batches.
I used the pumps with WEST but I was usually making larger batches than the projects I do now.

Now, as to heat, that remains to be seen...

As the epoxy heats up (by the engine heat) it will get a little softer (rubbery) and then when the engine cools, the epoxy will re-harden and will not get soft again until it is brought to a higher temperature. Typical post-curing. I think...

Since there is an airgap between the engine and the covers the thickness of the Velcro it shouldn't get as hot as the engine cases which are probably about oil temperature.
My belief (and hope) is that it will act like high temp paint that is heat cured through heat cycles.
Or, maybe they will just melt and I can sell them on eBay as art sculptures... as Salvador Dalli "Soft Covers".
(see: Soft Watch at the Moment of First Explosion)

This, like life in general, is an experiment.
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Old 04-21-2013, 04:42 PM   #95
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Eek What did it cost?

What did it cost to build? is a common question.

Until yesterday I didn't know since I had not kept track.
It is a fun build project, not an investment, right?

However, now I know that I was way, way off in my thinking.

Yesterday I spent three hours going down the list of parts I bought for a post in the "What mods..." thread on DRRiders.com.

The result was very... shocking, to say the least!
I told someone at the bike show my best "guesstimate" was about HALF what I actually spent.
Something to think about if you are considering a project like this.

Here is the breakdown:

Warp 9 19" front wheel with 320mm disc ($450)
Used front caliper ($35)
Brake pads front & rear ($75)
SS brake lines front & rear ($100)
Shinko 705 tires front & rear ($150)
Tubes front & rear ($42)
Fork Skins ($15)
Dual headlight / numberplate (parts) ($35)
Flat track handlebars ($75)
Clutch & brake levers ($25)
Bar end mirrors - mounted inboard ($25)
Sigma electronic bicycle speedo ($17)
Electronic tach/hour meter ($17)
Throttle cables ($36)
Steering head bearing kit ($44)
Fork seals ($30)
Fork bushings ($28)
Engine oil fill cap ($12)
Side cover gaskets ($36)
Billet oil cooler (on back order) ($75)
Engine SS cap screw set ($30)
Exhaust gasket ($9)
Muffler ($65)
Exhaust tubing & bends ($48)
Header wrap ($22)
Ballistic Evo battery ($127)
Jet kit with extended fuel screw ($75)
Carb vent filter ($15)
Choke knob ($18)
Fuel filter ($4)
K&N pod filter ($40)
Silicone hose & aluminum tube for intake ($34)
Clymer manual ($38)
Suzuki manual ($78 )
Magnetic drain bolt ($14)
Gas cap vent valve ($12)
Chain & sprockets ($140)
Case saver chain guard ($36)
Cush drive rubbers ($46)
Cush hub bearing & seal ($16)
Sprocket bolt set ($12)
Rear wheel bearing kit ($24)
Rear caliper rebuild kit ($35)
Ball bearing lower chain roller ($16)
Rear axle lock nut ($5)
Warp 9 lower chain guide ($60)
Swingarm chain slider ($42)
Cogent rear shock with bling ring & reduced travel ($500)
ATV shock cover ($24)
Swing arm linkage bearing kit ($80)
Swing arm bearing kit ($60)
Wide foot pegs ($32)
LED turn signals & tail lights ($50)
LED electronic flasher ($30)
Fiam loud horn ($14)
Fiberglass front fender ($80)
Fiberglass TT seat ($165)
Fiberglass, epoxy, & supplies to make tank, etc. ($200)
Petcock ($22)
Gas cap ($16)
Paint (fiberglass) primer, base, & clear ($150)
Frame powder paint ($280)
Forgotten bits and pieces ($150+)

Total parts & items purchased = ($4,250+)!!!

Cost of used bike needing work = ($1,500)
Number of hours rebuilding = (Don't even think about it!)
Number of hours rebuilding regretted (Maybe 10, sanding fiberglass)

Of course all those parts were bought over time, usually not more than $200 at a go.
It really adds up though. I had to go through the list three times to make sure I hadn't added it up wrong.

We spend what we can afford on our hobbies, eh?
And usually a good bit more than that.
The front wheel and rear shock were the only big expense items.
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:29 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by JagLite View Post
Haven't ridden it yet after the rebuild since we still have a lot of snow.
It is warming up so it shouldn't be more than a few WEEKS! before I can ride.
It was 16 F when I took the dogs out in the morning.

I don't know if the DR is a lost spark design or not.
Seems likely to me as that makes the ignition system more simple for Suzuki to make.
So there seems like several vendors that are selling this item. Must be pretty new, as I was looking for the exact thing about 6 months ago and could not find a small electronic tach for under $100.

Based on the discription of another seller:
Max RPM 1 spark per revolution is 13000
Max RPM 2 spark per revolution is 24000

Which would suggest that it would accomidate the DR350 (and possibly the 650s) ignition system. I guess a lost/wasted spark ignition systme is fairly common, esspecially on smaller engines.

I assume there is a selector which you set the desired input?
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Old 04-23-2013, 08:38 PM   #97
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Laugh How tacky!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPulldown View Post
So there seems like several vendors that are selling this item. Must be pretty new, as I was looking for the exact thing about 6 months ago and could not find a small electronic tach for under $100.

Based on the discription of another seller:
Max RPM 1 spark per revolution is 13000
Max RPM 2 spark per revolution is 24000

Which would suggest that it would accomidate the DR350 (and possibly the 650s) ignition system. I guess a lost/wasted spark ignition systme is fairly common, esspecially on smaller engines.

I assume there is a selector which you set the desired input?
There must be but I can't remember now.
(Very poor memory)
I have a Trail Tech TTO tach/hour meter on my other DR and they set up the same way.
http://www.trailtech.net/tto.html

I bought the Ebay tach for the Tracker because I was doing a low budget build. (I thought! )
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Old 04-24-2013, 02:33 PM   #98
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Where did you get the wide footpegs for $32? I have been having a hell of a time finding pegs for less then $100.
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Old 04-24-2013, 02:53 PM   #99
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Where did you get the wide footpegs for $32? I have been having a hell of a time finding pegs for less then $100.
Not sure which one Jag used, but I have these for my DR:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1996-1997-Su...2f7b76&vxp=mtr

Works pretty good. Volar Motor sports. Many of us 350 guys have used these pegs with great results.

I am pretty sure the 650 and the 350 use the same pegs.

MrPulldown screwed with this post 04-25-2013 at 11:49 AM
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Old 04-24-2013, 02:58 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by MrPulldown View Post
Not sure which one Jag used, but I have these for my DR:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1996-1997-Su...2f7b76&vxp=mtr

Works pretty good. Volar Motor sports. Many of use 350 guys have used these pegs with great results.

I am pretty sure the 650 and the 350 use the same pegs.
I'll check them out, I've got a DRZ.
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Old 04-24-2013, 03:13 PM   #101
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Thumb Great wide pegs

Here is where I bought mine:
http://www.d2moto.com/p-30868-suzuki...foot-pegs.aspx

I have bought pegs for several bikes from them and I am very happy with the quality/price.
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Old 05-03-2013, 11:15 PM   #102
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Eh? Emgo muffler

I finally was able to start the tracker up this week.
(we are buying a house and moving...)
It ran terrible and sounded worse.

I pulled the carb off and it was all gummy inside.
After cleaning it out and reinstalling it, the engine runs much better but I will need to spend some time tuning it.

It is super loud even with the new Emgo reverse cone megaphone muffler.

I pulled the muffler core out and I discovered the reason why it is so loud...



Can you see the problem?









How bizarre!
Almost no packing in there at all.
Only a tiny fragment against the end cap.
It was all clumped together like paper mache' too.
The muffler was brand new with not a scratch or finger print on it when I bought it.
I doubt I ran the engine more than 3 minutes total before pulling the core out.
But the wire wrap that holds the fiberglass packing is wound around the core.
It's a mystery!

Too bad I threw a large trash bag of leftover house insulation away.
But I have friends building a house so I will pick up a few scraps to pack it with.

Next winter I will weld up a new pipe so I can get rid of the ugly weld pipe with mummy wrap and I will probably weld on a flange and use a GSXR muffler instead.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:53 PM   #103
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I used two Emgo reverse cone mufflers on my tracker build.



They came as spare parts with a bike I got from my father-in-law. He said they were short on stuffing as well. I don't think I posted this in my build thread, but the mufflers were stupid-loud. They made it annoying to ride the bike. So I pulled the cores and bought some perforated pipe that was the same dia as my pipes (the Emgo cores where bigger than I needed) and made some new cores.



With smaller cores and more room for packing I thought it would really cut down on sound, but it did almost nothing. Later I added spark arrestors so I could legally ride it in the national forest and they really helped with the sound. They also helped with some mid-RPM power loss that I was experiencing.

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Old 05-06-2013, 03:22 PM   #104
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Are those sink strainers. NICE!
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Old 05-06-2013, 04:41 PM   #105
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Are those sink strainers. NICE!
No:

http://www.cheapcycleparts.com/products/76464

But it does make you wonder...
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