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Old 04-20-2013, 06:18 AM   #16
BlueLghtning
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cataract2 View Post
Has anyone tried this one?
Well first off, that's only the bottom half. That doesn't include the MC attachment part and looking at Northern Tool, I don't see it listed.

Also, unless they juts aren't showing it as the bottom half looks identical to the HF version, it doesn't have the extended feet that probably make it more stable when bolted down, but even more than that, one of the feet as the bottom half of the bead breaker on it so that is strange.
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Old 04-20-2013, 03:47 PM   #17
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Wicked MC tire Changer

www.nomartirechanger.com

I've used one of theirs for many years. This is a basic tire changer made for motorcycle's by motorcycle riders. This has all the features you might need and the price if pretty good. A lot of clubs get together and buy one as a group item.

I now own a small "ranger style" car tire changer that came with the motorcycle attachments. It was made in China and as arrived it was a POS have a friend who's a machinist and we redesigned or fixed all the issues. If I had to pay someone the cost would have been more than the changer was worth. Many is the time I wish I still had the "no mar" manual changer.

If you wish to go into a semi-auto type changer go on-line and see what greg smith has to offer. The sell a lot of bottom end made in China item but they back products and have some quality control checks which insure you don't get total crap. The changer's they sell look just like the one I purchased but they work out of the box which is more than mine did.
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:06 PM   #18
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First off, big thanx to JimVonBaden and BlueLghtning for putting together and sharing the "how-to-use" tutorials.

I bought a HF tire changer and motorcycle adaptor a few years ago, promptly losing the (useless) directions, and have been pondering in fear and ignorance on how to actually use this device. Now I have knowledge, confidence and need to spend more money on blocks and a mount/demount bar.

Incidentally, I was wondering if anyone had used the "lower half" to actually change a car or truck tire?
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:22 PM   #19
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I changed a 12" & a 14" trailer tire on the main HF unit. I never tried with any kind of car or truck tire though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HapHazard View Post
First off, big thanx to JimVonBaden and BlueLghtning for putting together and sharing the "how-to-use" tutorials.

I bought a HF tire changer and motorcycle adaptor a few years ago, promptly losing the (useless) directions, and have been pondering in fear and ignorance on how to actually use this device. Now I have knowledge, confidence and need to spend more money on blocks and a mount/demount bar.

Incidentally, I was wondering if anyone had used the "lower half" to actually change a car or truck tire?
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Old 04-23-2013, 03:27 PM   #20
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So I watched the video on the Nomar, to change a dirt tire. He uses regular tire spoons to mount and remove the tire, and the device simply holds the wheel in place. Am I missing something? How is that $450 better than the milk crate I use? If it removed and seated the tire easier I could see the benefit. Maybe that's just a dirt tire issue?
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Old 04-23-2013, 03:52 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HapHazard View Post
First off, big thanx to JimVonBaden and BlueLghtning for putting together and sharing the "how-to-use" tutorials.

I bought a HF tire changer and motorcycle adaptor a few years ago, promptly losing the (useless) directions, and have been pondering in fear and ignorance on how to actually use this device. Now I have knowledge, confidence and need to spend more money on blocks and a mount/demount bar.

Incidentally, I was wondering if anyone had used the "lower half" to actually change a car or truck tire?

I've changed a lot of car/truck tires with the HF changer. It takes a bit of practice but once you're used to it you can change them pretty quick.
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Old 04-23-2013, 04:05 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott_PDX View Post
So I watched the video on the Nomar, to change a dirt tire. He uses regular tire spoons to mount and remove the tire, and the device simply holds the wheel in place. Am I missing something? How is that $450 better than the milk crate I use? If it removed and seated the tire easier I could see the benefit. Maybe that's just a dirt tire issue?
I don't have the Nomar but did make my own low $$$ tire changing fixture and having the wheel firmly secured and at waist level makes all the difference, tire changes are much easier. A bead breaker like their attachment is a great help too, especially on big stiff tubeless radials, also made my own from scrap. Those tools along with real tire mounting lube (Ruglyde) and some zip ties (learned to use them in another thread here) have made the whole process relatively easy and eliminated pinched tubes completely. Anyway, IMHO if you change tires fairly often it is well worth buying or building some tools for the job (and much easier on your back too ;-)




victor441 screwed with this post 04-23-2013 at 04:13 PM
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Old 04-23-2013, 04:10 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HapHazard View Post
Incidentally, I was wondering if anyone had used the "lower half" to actually change a car or truck tire?
I've mounted nine car tires with mine. Mounting is the cheap part at the tire shop, though--balancing is the expensive part that I can't do at home.
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Old 04-23-2013, 05:48 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victor441 View Post
I don't have the Nomar but did make my own low $$$ tire changing fixture and having the wheel firmly secured and at waist level makes all the difference, tire changes are much easier. A bead breaker like their attachment is a great help too, especially on big stiff tubeless radials, also made my own from scrap. Those tools along with real tire mounting lube (Ruglyde) and some zip ties (learned to use them in another thread here) have made the whole process relatively easy and eliminated pinched tubes completely. Anyway, IMHO if you change tires fairly often it is well worth buying or building some tools for the job (and much easier on your back too ;-)

I'm thinking along the same lines as you, making my own. I'm curious how you secure the rim to keep it from moving?

The idea I have is similar to yours but I was gong to put slots in the base board and run two tie down straps around the spokes through the slots in the base to keep the wheel from twisting on me.

As far as breaking the bead I've found that leaving the wheel on the bike and breaking the bead with a c-clamp has worked pretty good.

Your fab jobs look great

I also use a mixture or liquid body soap and mineral oil for a tire lube.
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:25 PM   #25
watchmen
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While searching for alternatives, I found this thread.

Has anyone tried this tire changer? At a quick glance it seems like it has everything you need. I wonder if anyone on here has tried it, I hate to be the first guinea pig.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tire-Changer...2be125&vxp=mtr
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:06 AM   #26
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Tire changes are easy.

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Old 07-03-2013, 06:32 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by watchmen View Post
While searching for alternatives, I found this thread.

Has anyone tried this tire changer? At a quick glance it seems like it has everything you need. I wonder if anyone on here has tried it, I hate to be the first guinea pig.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tire-Changer...2be125&vxp=mtr

too small.....

4" to 16.5" Diameter
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Old 07-03-2013, 06:56 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rustynut2 View Post
too small.....

4" to 16.5" Diameter
I thought that at first too, but I think that is the rim width limitations. I could be wrong as the ad isn't clear. Message the seller. Since it advertises for motorcycles, and almost no motorcycles have under a 17" wheel, I am hopefull.

Otherwise it looks like an OK unit for the price.

Jim
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:16 PM   #29
MaestroPNW OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rustynut2 View Post
too small.....

4" to 16.5" Diameter
I arrived at the same conclusion - judging by the measurements on the pictures, 16.5 looks to ne realistic.
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Old 07-03-2013, 06:34 PM   #30
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My Latest HF ad had a tire changer in it.





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