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Old 04-30-2013, 07:30 PM   #16
Patch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xianx View Post
Ok so what's everyone's favorite one person tent??
I like the Big Agnes FlyCreek 1 .. small and light, though after a long weekend in one I went back to my Hubba Hubba (2 man) as I really enjoy a bit of space in my tent.
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Old 04-30-2013, 07:37 PM   #17
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I really like the MSR tents, the Hubba, Hubba Hubba.
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:06 PM   #18
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I'm a Kelty fan. I've been using one of their 2 person "Salidia" tents for a few years now and still like it. It's a bit short so you can't stand up in it but you have a vestibule to store some gear enough room inside for you and your helmet and jacket. I only keep my boots and luggage in the Vestibule.

However many people you want to put in a tent add +1 to the size so you have room to move around and store gear.
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:09 PM   #19
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I own several bivy's and over the past 25 years or so have slept a bunch of nights in them. Other than being small the various ones I own have little in common, some are bug shelters that weigh 7 oz. and the other end of the spectrum is a 2 1/2 pound bomber 4 season shelter that I've used heavily for a long time.

Originally these were the only reasonably safe option for a couple of reasons but that was years ago and under much less forgiving conditions and tents have come a long ways.

I still use mine for some trips and always with a mld patrol shelter to put overhead. In the photo is everything a guy would need to camp comfortably in temps to about 40.

The redbag holds a western mountaineering down bag, on the left is a 25x77 thermarest neoair at 19oz and the center bag holds an MLD bivy and the patrol shelter tarp and stakes, the end of the poles can be seen under the neoair.

I tour on an xr and a small kit helps but 2 1/2 lb tents are so readily available that if I'm going for over a few days I usually carry one of those just for the simplicity of setup.

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Old 04-30-2013, 09:29 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by xianx View Post
Lots of good info here thank you all.

I ask about a bivy because in my sick little head I feel that when camping less is more. If i cant get in my back pack i dont need it. So my 3 must haves; food, water, shelter. My opinion of shelter is that it should be just that. Keep me out of the elements and keep skeeters from chewing on my sweet ass. Though having room to change clothes would be nice, but it's not a deal breaker. But not having a place to keep gear sucks so that would be a deal breaker. So looks like the bivy is out.

Ok so what's everyone's favorite one person tent??
I'll be the one man out that thinks you were right on track with the bivy. Light is right.

Under 2 pounds. I carry a silnylon tarp that packs up like a grapefruit for rain but rairly need it. The package gives you more room in the rain than any tent of the same weight and size and you can't beat the feeling of hanging out in just a bag and bivy if the weather is not horible. You can use the tarp to give you a place to cook or sit by a campfire in the rain which is more than any tent can do. Put all your gear in a black plastic yard waste bag overnight if the weather is bad or just hang it on your bike if it is clear.

A bivy, tarp, and plastic bag give you more options than any tent of the same size and weight. Any bivy that provides some support to keep the bug netting off your face will be a happy home.











Bivy (including bivy, poles, stakes, & ground sheet), sleeping bag, pad.

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Old 05-01-2013, 12:58 AM   #21
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I have a two pole goretex Outdoor research.

I hate sleeping in the thing, it's great if you're a back sleeper and don't mind not having a lot of room. Mine sleeps hot, so I sweat and soak my bag, not a big deal with fake down, big deal with real down.

I keep it around and toss it in the car for winter trips as a just in case deal.

With as much space as you have on a bike, I'd rather have a very small 2person tent, or one person If I way backpacking again.
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Old 05-01-2013, 06:53 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
I'll be the one man out that thinks you were right on track with the bivy. Light is right.

Under 2 pounds. I carry a silnylon tarp that packs up like a grapefruit for rain but rairly need it. The package gives you more room in the rain than any tent of the same weight and size. You can use the tarp to give you a place to cook or sit by a campfire in the rain which is more than any tent can do. .
A bivy, tarp, and plastic bag give you more options than any tent of the same size and weight.
Bivy (including bivy, poles, stakes, & ground sheet), sleeping bag, pad.
No offence, but I think you're promoting the Tarp more than the bivy..... The bivy don't offer any options, the tarp is what does it. A good 1 man tent will be less than 1lb more than the bivy. A 2 man won't be much more, and using the same tarp will make for a much better experience IMO. You'll have a private space to change clothes, read, masturbate, and a place to store gear without having to carry a large plastic bag to stuff you gear into.

Stuffing my damp, wet or sweaty riding gear in a garbage all night to keep if from becoming more wet is not my idea of comfort when I'll need to wear it the next day.

Having said that, I think a hammock can be a great option for a small package, light weight set-up. All the gear gets hung under the tarp or inside the hammock. And you're off the ground so nothing gets wet and none of your gear is coated in bugs.
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Old 05-01-2013, 07:01 AM   #23
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Yep, tarps are very versatile, whether you use a tent, a bivy or something else.
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Old 05-01-2013, 11:55 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squish View Post
With as much space as you have on a bike, I'd rather have a very small 2person tent, or one person If I way backpacking again.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maggot12 View Post
A good 1 man tent will be less than 1lb more than the bivy. A 2 man won't be much more, ...
No offence taken. It's just a different frame of mind and different priorities. Extra weight or bulk subtracts joy from the riding experience whether it's having to slow down on singletrack or that wallow you get leaned over in a turn while carrying a load. More weight + bulk = less riding fun and many small choices can add up to a big difference. I motorcycle camp, bicycle camp, backpack, and climb and carrying a light load always makes for a better experience. I care more about the ride than comfort in camp. Everybody's different.

In 25+ years of using a bivy and/or tarp whenever it makes sense I've never had an uncomfortable night whether it's at high camp on Mt. Rainier in 60 mph winds (a bivy doesn't flap in the wind), hiking in the Hoh Rainforest, or motocamping in the southern Oregon or Idaho desert at 100+ degrees. With a bivy you can leave the tarp at home if the weather is likely to be pleasant and have a very small package to carry for shelter. If you guess the weather wrong you might have a less comfortable night but the bivy will keep you warm and dry all by itself. If it's hot without many bugs you can bring the tarp for shade and leave the bivy at home. If you end up at a cheap motel you can roll out the bivy on the bed to keep out the bed bugs. If you are in a hotel room or hut in the tropics you can roll out the bivy to keep out the malaria mosquitoes. I find a bivy + tarp to provide more options. It's not for everybody.

If you approach packing with the idea of "What small and light equipment will get the job done?" and "What can I leave home?" you end up traveling light.





Or you can make all your packing decisions with the idea "plenty of space on a bike" or "it's only 1 lb more" and have a different outcome. Niether is right or wrong but there is a difference in the riding experience.




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Old 05-01-2013, 06:43 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
Extra weight or bulk subtracts joy from the riding experience whether it's having to slow down on singletrack or that wallow you get leaned over in a turn while carrying a load. More weight + bulk = less riding fun
Quote:
"What small and light equipment will get the job done?"
These are some of my thoughts exactly. Another thing that I think about is security and someone running off with my shit. If its with me all the time then I don't have to worry about it.

One of my thoughts has always been, why are the dudes that are doing single track carrying so much stuff? If you were getting into some pretty tight and technical stuff wouldn't that be a hindrance?

Here in the good ol heartland we don't have a lot of trail riding, especially in central IA where I live. You'd have to cross a few state lines to really get out there and consider it "roughing it". And I'm not that good of an off road rider as it is. So my camping would be done as a means of trying to get to a destination. Ya know ride all day, camp, ride all day, camp, ride all day and you're there kinda thing.

My wife loves going for rides with me but we have yet to moto-camp and I'm not sure we are up for it yet. We've got 2 young boys(4&3) so it's tough to get both of us away for more than a weekend. And until they are both old enough to ride it'll probably just be me and some of my biker friends going out forms long weekend.

You guys have been a huge help thank you so much!
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Old 05-01-2013, 10:05 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xianx View Post
These are some of my thoughts exactly. Another thing that I think about is security and someone running off with my shit. If its with me all the time then I don't have to worry about it.

One of my thoughts has always been, why are the dudes that are doing single track carrying so much stuff? If you were getting into some pretty tight and technical stuff wouldn't that be a hindrance?
Two very good points. I've gotten my 7+ day, below freezing/rain/100+ desert load to about 40 pounds including a day's food. Undo three straps and the GiantLoop goes on my shoulder to take it with me anytime I want to be away from the bike and don't want to leave everything.

Extra weight on technical terrain can be more than a hindrance. It really raises the risk level when you are "on your own" whether that means riding by yourself or traveling in a group away from assistance. Heavy = slow which can mean you are riding after dark instead of happily sipping Red Breast at camp by the fire. Heavy = less control which means a higher risk of falls and injury in mud, sand, rocks, roots, and narrow, steep trails. Heavy = hard which means more fatigue and more mistakes. Heavy = reduced options which means instead of riding through a difficult stretch you have to turn around or find another way. That can lead to fuel problems, fatigue, getting lost, and a late night.

Traveling light also means you can cover more territory. Packing and strapping 5 things to a bike takes less time than packing and strapping 20. Would you rather spend your time loading crap on a bike or riding it?

Best of luck to you and your family.

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Old 05-01-2013, 10:17 PM   #27
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Sparrowhawk has got it right. Light is right. But I'm lucky enough to have a bivy as well as a light tent and a couple heavier tents. 2 nights or less I usually bivy, more I usually tent. I sweat more than I'd like sleeping, so after a few days my sleeping bag stops being very effective. . . I've pushed the bivy up to 4 nights backpacking in rainy weather, but the nights were miserable honestly.

bivy and a small tarp, all my camping gear was in the medium blue duffel in the picture:





And a lightweight single wall tent that sets up with trekking poles, it's about a pound heavier than the bivy:
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:13 AM   #28
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wiggy's bivy

I just picked up my first bivy off craigslist and it's awesome to see other setups, especially the tarp arrangements.

Mine is a Wiggy's bivy similar to this one: http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=52

It's not a ultralight affair, but the top is insulated so it doubles as a 45 degree bag. Ideally you can leave your sleeping bag at home in the summer and double up bags in the winter to be extra cozy. It's not going to replace my Kelty one-man tent, but I think it will be great for a lot of situations.

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Old 05-03-2013, 07:31 PM   #29
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I have done tons of back country camping and climbing only using a bivy sack. My bivy of choice is from Mountain Hardware, which has seen temps as low as -15 to upper 70's. Also rain and snow. I did however pick up a tent this past year and have only used it twice, lady friend and all ... If you want a pretty easy to set up tent (under 3 minutes) that fits you and gear or another person check out the

Black Diamond Firstlight

Season : 4
Capacity : 2
Doors : 1
Average Packed Weight :
1.5 kg, 3 lb 5 oz
Minimum Weight :
1.28 kg, 2 lb 13 oz
Dimensions :
208 x 123 x 123 x 107 cm, 82 x 48 x 48 x 42 in
Area :
2.5 mē, 27.3 sq ft
Packed Size :
15 x 23 cm, 6 x 9 in
Then there is the


Black Diamond Spotlight Bivy

Season : 4
Minimum Weight :
510 g, 1 ib 2 oz
Average Packed Weight :
670 g, 1 lb 7 oz
Dimensions :
234 x 76 x 51 cm, 92 x 30 x 20 in
Area :
1.7 m2, 18.5 sq ft
Packed Size :
10 x 19 cm, 4 x 7.5 in
I am not a sponsored BD user, actually my tent was made by Bibler and is the I-tent. Bibler was bought out by BD. I come from a mountain climbing, back country hiking and skiing back ground where the moto light is right is the moniker.



I'm sure there are other tents that might suit your need. But for me, I really like my bivy sack. Nothing like checking out the stars as your eyes start getting heavy.
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