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Old 02-26-2013, 12:30 PM   #76
Andylaser
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Another vote for Adventure Medical Kits. I add some "water gel" burns dressings. If you are camping and have a stove, sooner or later you will get burnt. They also work well on blisters.
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:44 PM   #77
CJGamer
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This is on sale all the time- and a good basis to start with

http://www.rei.com/product/832243/re...it-special-buy

the little red pack is good to organize stuff too. i've pulled out a bunch of stuff to our bigger plastic car kits, and put in some extra splints, bigger tape, larger wrap etc... I also have some stronger medicine like 4 oxycodone etc.

+1 on the kotex. I also have 2 super small ob tampons. Great for nasty broken noses bleading profusely.
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Old 04-25-2013, 02:44 PM   #78
teomannaskali
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Swimming shorts makes an excellent sling, it is even adjustable. I used one when i had broken my clavicle.

Head goes in from one leg, and the arm goes in through the other leg, Your wrist hangs from you neck with the waist part which is adjustable.
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Old 05-11-2013, 04:17 PM   #79
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Med supplies sale

Just got Email from LA police gear they are having a sale on emergence med supplies. I just stumbled across this thread last night at work it caught my attention mainly because of my accident last oct 31 which I'm just now returning to work from crushed my tibia above my ankle with spiral fracture from knee through bottom of bone and fractured fibia just below knee Ti rod and 6 months later things are looking up. Need to get my kit put together since I do a lot of dual sport by myself accident got me thinking about taking first responder course. Sorry could not figure out how to forward email.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:11 PM   #80
Yakima
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Another diabetic...

After 47 years with Type 1 I've learned a few things.
First is that most people haven't a clue about diabetes--even many who have the disease.
Second is that you can't miss giving sugar or Pepsi or hard candy. Not chocolate: the fat slows down sugar absorption.
If glucose is already high, a Pepsi isn't going to matter. If it's low, Pepsi etc will be just what the doctor ordered.
Look for weird behavior: angry and short, can't concentrate, incoherent (worse than usual!) acting "drunk" ---all are some symptoms.
+1 on give it even if I say I'm fine. My wife can tell you stories about the things I've done when glucose was low that I cannot remember doing or saying.
There are a lot of diabetics out there and even more ignorance. Do some reading. Your friend with diabetes will appreciate it.
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Old 05-12-2013, 07:13 AM   #81
Robidob
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Im back.

Hey Gents and Gals,
I am back around so I can answer more questions if you have any.
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Old 05-12-2013, 07:17 AM   #82
Robidob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andylaser View Post
Another vote for Adventure Medical Kits. I add some "water gel" burns dressings. If you are camping and have a stove, sooner or later you will get burnt. They also work well on blisters.
It would be great to get your hands on one of the small tubes of silver sulfadiazine(aka: silvadene) its hard to find the small tubes normally you end up with a giant tub of the stuff. by far the best easy treatment for a burn. Just be careful if you have a sulfa drug allergy.
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Old 05-18-2014, 12:34 PM   #83
Hans_Krugger
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Good on you for stepping up to help out a fellow rider. Just a couple of things about your suggestions that I'd change.

Get rid of the 2x2's and the 6x6's. Use 4x4's and a couple of abdominal bandages, they'll absorb more fluid and the 4x4's can always be folded or cut down. Individually wrapped, sterile 4x4's can be found at any drugstore, they're cheap and pack flat, get as many plies/thickness as possible for maximum absorption.

Antiseptic wipes are far better than alcohol wipes for cleaning any sort of broken skin, alcohol will burn and it is cytotoxic, kills the good cells as well as the bad ones. BZK (benzalkonium chloride) wipes are bigger, work better and don't sting. They're also cheap if you buy a box of 100. I do keep a couple of alcohol wipes in my tool kit in case I ever need to apply Loctite or epoxy to something, they work well for cleaning plastic and metal.

More gloves is better. Like at least 6 pairs. Nitrile is probably best as they're hypoallergenic, good for you, good for the patient.

I'd skip the vet wrap, In my experience it's not all it's cracked up to be. Once it's been stretched out it loses it's elasticity very quickly and falls off. I'd use a couple of 6" elastic bandages and tape. The elastic bandages can also be used with your splint, to hold a cold pack in place, to immobilize a dislocated or broken extremity even if you don't have a splint.

For a compression bandage, pick up an "Izzy", an Israeli combat bandage. They're great, they can be self applied as well as used on others. Come in a sterile package, available in 4"and 6" widths. One should suffice for the average kit.

For a splint, pick up a SAM or one of the many no-name copies. Aluminum bonded with some thin foam padding they can be cut, folded, modded into just about anything. I've used them to make finger splints, just cut off a slice and make sure the edges aren't sharp. They come rolled up, very handy.

If the recommended use for the Benadryl is for treatment of insect stings, get a small bottle of the children's liquid. It's much faster acting. They also make Benadryl in a gel form, great for topical applications but not for internal usage. If you or anyone you're traveling with is known to be susceptible to anaphylaxis from insect stings, make sure you or they are carrying an up to date Epi pen. Same thing for known diabetics and asthma sufferers, don't be like a lot of my patients and tell me that you left your Epi pen, inhaler, and insulin at home. Something to remember about Benadryl, it will make you drowsy, not recommended if you or the patient is going to be continuing to ride.

Saline can be found in small 20-30 ml individually sterilized squeeze bottles, very handy for flushing out wounds and debris from the eyes as well.

I'd also think about getting some sort of tourniquet, a CAT or something equivalent and make sure it's not a Chinese ripoff design. The protocols for treating arterial bleeding in extremities is pressure bandages followed by use of a tourniquet in many areas now. If you should come across or be involved in an incident in which a person has suffered from a traumatic injury to an extremity, you'll never stop the bleeding by trying to find a pressure point, particularly if they're wearing a riding suit. A properly applied tourniquet will save a limb as well as life in an extreme injury situation. In addition to actually stopping the bleeding, a tourniquet allows a single caregiver to deal with multiple patients once it's been applied correctly.

I'd also toss a small headlamp in with the first aid kit, it sucks to not be able to see what you're doing and you can't do much with one hand holding a flashlight.

I'd also consider separating the true "first aid" stuff from the "booboo" stuff. If you come across an accident, you need to be able to access that tourniquet or Izzy right now, the pain relievers and bandaids can go into a separate bag or box to be used as needed. I keep a couple of bandaid, some Advil, Tums and a small bottle of eye drops in a little zippered case inside my tankbag for easy, non-emergent use. The real stuff is in a separate trauma bag. All I'm really concerned with in an emergent situation is trying to ensure the patient is breathing and trying to stop traumatic blood loss. The road rash etc. can be fixed later when you've got everyone off to the side of the road or trail. Same thing with medications.

For reference, I am a licensed, working EMT in the state of California but I'm not a doctor, in particular I'm not your doctor so take everything I've written with a grain of salt and don't rely on it to save yours or anyone else's life without further training.
Thanks for sharing your expertise.
A year or two a go, I took my XT250 out into the Wayne National Forest. Although I am an old wilderness traveler and old motorcyclist, I am a newbie to adventure riding. Like most newbies, I screwed up and got myself down in a tight place. I flipped my bike three times trying to get out of a tight ravine. At 57 getting slammed on my back wasnt as fun as I thought. I had no injuries, besides being banged up. I had some pain killers with me - I cut one in half and used it. It made all the difference in the world. Nope ...did not get the bike out that day. I was sensible and walked to the ridge top, used my cell and called the Calvary. I have found pain killers damned useful on mountaineering trips too. The key is, take just enough to cut the pain so you can function. Dont turn it into a party.
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Old 05-19-2014, 06:29 AM   #84
catweasel67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans_Krugger View Post
Thanks for sharing your expertise.
A year or two a go, I took my XT250 out into the Wayne National Forest. Although I am an old wilderness traveler and old motorcyclist, I am a newbie to adventure riding. Like most newbies, I screwed up and got myself down in a tight place. I flipped my bike three times trying to get out of a tight ravine. At 57 getting slammed on my back wasnt as fun as I thought. I had no injuries, besides being banged up. I had some pain killers with me - I cut one in half and used it. It made all the difference in the world. Nope ...did not get the bike out that day. I was sensible and walked to the ridge top, used my cell and called the Calvary. I have found pain killers damned useful on mountaineering trips too. The key is, take just enough to cut the pain so you can function. Dont turn it into a party.
Hmm, I'd never take a pain killer (and certainly not one strong enough to "make a world of difference") and continue the same action. That's just gonna risk further, greater, injury because you're (or rather the pill) masking the symptoms that'd normally tell you to stop.
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:08 AM   #85
tmills
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Ok what I carry is 4x4's, triangular bandages, pressure dressing, asst of band aids, pocket mask, hand sanitizer and wipes ( baby wipes will do), a Sam splint, some OTC allergy meds and ibuprophen and Tylenol (the little tubes) a tube of sunscreen and aloe after burn all in a bug ass ziplock bag (I can see what I have and it's waterproof) . Stay away from quick clot it can actually cause more harm then good in first aides hands. I am a paramedic/firefighter with 25 yrs experience


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