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Old 05-16-2013, 08:48 AM   #1426
moe.ron
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Joined: Mar 2009
Location: Ventura County
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It would be helpful if I could get it to flash the wife's birthday.
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Old 05-16-2013, 03:11 PM   #1427
bogboy
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Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Westford, Ma.
Oddometer: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFive View Post
Or.....just ignore it. Honestly, I don't even notice it anymore. Hope it burns out someday.

HF
Ya, I could do that. I didn't know if it was annoying at night or not. As long as its not like my06 Mountaineer. Way to much info all the time

Thanx
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:17 AM   #1428
exotesthrasouden
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Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Germany
Oddometer: 77
Cleaning

Dumb question:
How do you guys clean your bike after it has gotten very muddy?

Around here if I get off pavement I eventually get stuck in some mud too, resulting in the bike being pretty covered with the stuff.

On the way home I ensure to ride off a few high curbs and such to 'knock off' what I can. The issue is getting the mud off that sticks around by the chain, rear suspension and such. Hard to get in there and too much water pressure is a no-no.

I know it's a GS, doesn't need to shiny, but I'd like to avoid schlepping 10 lbs of mud whenever possible.

Thanks,
Ryan
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:10 AM   #1429
Reaver
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Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Tronna area, Ontario Canada
Oddometer: 2,240
Cleaning

A pressure washer is fine so long as it's on "fan" and not a direct jet. Don't point it at your wheel bearings and pivot joints etc. Constant motion of the wand. Do it over grass to avoid muddying up the driveway. Or just a regular garden hose with a sprayer.

If you're playing in the mud then you're going to have to inspect your bearings more frequently anyway along with the other routine service.
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Old 05-18-2013, 09:54 AM   #1430
epicxcrider
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Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Seattle, WA
Oddometer: 645
Hose, sponge and soap. I avoid the pressure washer.
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Old 05-18-2013, 12:07 PM   #1431
duffs
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Joined: Jan 2012
Location: Battersea (London) UK
Oddometer: 1,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by exotesthrasouden View Post
Dumb question:
How do you guys clean your bike after it has gotten very muddy?

Around here if I get off pavement I eventually get stuck in some mud too, resulting in the bike being pretty covered with the stuff.

On the way home I ensure to ride off a few high curbs and such to 'knock off' what I can. The issue is getting the mud off that sticks around by the chain, rear suspension and such. Hard to get in there and too much water pressure is a no-no.

I know it's a GS, doesn't need to shiny, but I'd like to avoid schlepping 10 lbs of mud whenever possible.

Thanks,
Ryan
I get the worst of it off at my local petrol station's pressure washing station - although carefully. I never get the wand closer than about 30cm - at this range I can spray it on my bare hand without any pain/damage. Any closer and you run the risk of getting water in places it shouldn't go. Obviously avoiding spraying directly on the sensitive bits (wheel bearings/axles, chain, suspension pivots, electronics). The nice thing is that any mud goes straight down the grate and not on the clean floor of my building's car park.

Every few washes I follow this up with a complete detail at home with the garden hose, good opportunity to get right up close and personal with everything on the bike to check things like brake pad wear, chain tension, chips/scratches etc. Also to put plastic protector/dressing on the black bits and wax the paintwork.

And every few months I check the torque of the engine mounts, side/centre stands and chassis bolts with the torque wrench.
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duffs screwed with this post 05-19-2013 at 03:11 AM
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Old 05-18-2013, 03:28 PM   #1432
ThatGuy
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Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Oddometer: 4,575
Quick noob electrical question:

Planning to wire a couple of things:
Gerbings dangle
SAE dangle
Aux lights
Extra Powerlet plug.

In the past with my 1150 I ran three of these right off the battery(no powerlet). I dot intent to use the gerbings and SAE often if much at all.

The powerlet and lights have relays already attached and all four have thief own fuse. Should I be mounting these with a fuzeblock anyway? I picked up one of the TT fuzeblocks with the CanBus friendly option.
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Old 05-19-2013, 12:40 AM   #1433
Captain Excellent
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Joined: Sep 2011
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGuy View Post
Quick noob electrical question:

The powerlet and lights have relays already attached and all four have thief own fuse. Should I be mounting these with a fuzeblock anyway? I picked up one of the TT fuzeblocks with the CanBus friendly option.
Hey Guy, check out this thread
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=827565
Either way, a fuse block keeps things nice and tidy.
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Old 05-20-2013, 08:57 PM   #1434
Hucker
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Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Southern AZ
Oddometer: 672
Chain Question

Since this bike was new (2011 bought in November 2010), I have taken good care (my biased opinion) of the chain. Right after the break-in service, I cleaned all of the grease off the sprockets and chain using WD-40 and a grunge brush. I then washed it with soap and water, dried it, and then lubed liberally with Teflon Multi-use Lubricant. I have maintained with Teflon Chain Saver every 500 miles +/-, washing it with soap and water every 2,000 miles +/-.

I currently have 14k plus miles on it. I just did a bunch of dirt roads that had a lot of red rock dust. So, I cleaned the chain when I got home (straight soap and water). After it dried, I noticed that I could spin each roller on the chain with my fingers. There's little other "play" in the roller, other than being able to spin them by hand. There is little visible wear on either sprocket (paint is missing from the teeth, but nothing else visible).

When I was inspecting the chain before applying lube, I could hear a little "click" as each roller touched the front sprocket. Not a big deal until I spun the rear wheel fast a couple of times. It sounded "clicky."

I applied a liberal amount of the Teflon Multi-use Lubricant to each side plate and to both sides of the rollers (area between the inside of the side plates and the rollers) while spinning the rear wheel. As I did this, the "clicks" went away. Rode it to work 40 miles round trip and all felt/sounded well.

So, my question for the collective:

Is it normal to be able to spin the rollers with my fingers, or is it time to change it out?

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Old 05-20-2013, 09:49 PM   #1435
sorebutt
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Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Lewiston,ID
Oddometer: 1,612
I think you worry too much. The owners manual shows how to check the chain wear by pulling the chain off the back of the rear sproket. Don't worry about it if it is in tolerance. Just ride and have fun. You will definately know when it is wore out.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:09 AM   #1436
CheckerdD
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Location: Dave Rankine, Reno NV
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There are two views about chain maintenance. One is don't do anything till the chain breaks, then replace it. The other is to lube and clean every 400 or so miles and adjust the tension occasionally. I am in the latter camp, but the fact many riders are in the first camp should suggest to you that you don't need to worry so much. Dave
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:12 AM   #1437
Hucker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sorebutt View Post
I think you worry too much. The owners manual shows how to check the chain wear by pulling the chain off the back of the rear sproket. Don't worry about it if it is in tolerance. Just ride and have fun. You will definately know when it is wore out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheckerdD View Post
There are two views about chain maintenance. One is don't do anything till the chain breaks, then replace it. The other is to lube and clean every 400 or so miles and adjust the tension occasionally. I am in the latter camp, but the fact many riders are in the first camp should suggest to you that you don't need to worry so much. Dave
That's what I was thinking. Thanks for the replies!
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Old 05-22-2013, 07:25 AM   #1438
malloy
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Hucker - sounds like you are taking great care of your chain.
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Old 05-26-2013, 04:42 AM   #1439
AdvParamedic
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Location: Glen Innes, NSW
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Eh? Breaking in

Hey Guys,

New 13F8. Read the manual and it says to make sure your not riding at the same revs for a long period of time.. eg. ride lots of twisties & change of speed. Does anyone know what the reason is for this & also if there is any other "new bike" things to look out for when breaking in a "new" bike :)
I know about slippery tires but thats about it...

Thanks
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Old 05-26-2013, 05:57 AM   #1440
Squelch
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Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Daegu, Korea
Oddometer: 1,103
Medic - I just picked up a brand new F8GS too, and the dealer told me to make sure I ride country roads and shift a lot. Stay off the slab, and don't ride for long stretches of time at the same RPM and in the same gear. I think they want you to work the engine and transmission hard in the first 600 miles, to make sure that if there are any issues you find out early.

It also helps to seal the piston rings. There are some other methods for breaking in an engine, (and if you Google "break in new engine" or something similar, you'll see some) but as far as I'm concerned, the engineers at BMW designed the engine and they probably know more about it than anyone else. Also, if you go by the book, and something bad happens to the bike, you know it's not your fault...
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