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Old 04-03-2013, 11:07 PM   #31
MichaelLi OP
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check the pictures below,these bikes can be converted to left-hand, many bikes already in UK, australia ....

http://www.changjiangsidecar.com/upl...6214132122.jpg
http://www.changjiangsidecar.com/upl...2160030478.jpg
http://www.changjiangsidecar.com/upl...2160117974.jpg



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Manley View Post
I asked a similar question about buying a bike in China and riding it back on HU and got something to think about. If you go ahead keep me informed about how it went. I do not know about Ireland but in the UK we cannot register bikes with a right hand sidecar manufactured after 1981, although there are ways around that of course.

http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hub...in-china-50280
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:12 PM   #32
MichaelLi OP
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we organized these tours, for such long trip we have one or twice every year.

In 2013 , our Inner Mongolia trip will start on 20th of July, a ten days trip.
If you want find more photos of this trip, you can check here:
http://www.changjiangsidecar.com/Gan...car_tours.html
http://www.changjiangsidecar.com/Inn...lia_tours.html


Quote:
Originally Posted by Strong Bad View Post
Where can I get more information about these tours? I would love to come to China and tour on a sidecar!

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Old 04-03-2013, 11:43 PM   #33
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See these are our bikes registered successfully in US and they took part in one antique bike show, and got the first prize.

www.changjiangsidecar.com
e-mail: changjiangsidecar.com
skype: changjiangsidecar







Quote:
Originally Posted by tattoogunman View Post
I came across one local to me a few months ago (the one we were talking about), I was actually shocked to see someone selling a registered and tagged CJ750 and it was the first one I had seen - I had thought they were a myth up until that point

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Old 04-04-2013, 01:18 PM   #34
jaydmc
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I have spoken with customs officals in the USA who have had these crushed as they came in with out proper paper work. The paper work claimed that the new bikes were in fact old bikes. Even with false paper work the bikes still need to have DOT aproved wheels, tires, brakes, lights and more. To bring them in legal with out "fake" paper work they also need to meet EPA regulations. So while you may be able to bring them in some ports at others they will crush the bikes. Port of Seattle would have them crushed. Port of Tacoma less then 50 miles away more then likley you would not have problems. I have found this to be the case just bringing in sidecars. In the case of the sidecar. If the lights are installed on the sidecar no problem as lights are not required on sidecars. If however as is the case when we use to bring in Sputnik sidecars, if the lights are shipped with the sidecar and not installed then as you could be planing on installing the lights on some thing that requires DOT aproval they will not allow importation. I have spent a lot of money on lawyers dealing with customs on these issues and even had a senetor involved that US customs pretty much told him to go away that they can do what ever they want.
Bottom line, the bikes are not coming in legaly, you might get away with it, You might not. Would it not make more sense to do this right? Get proper certification like Ural did and even a Dnepr importer (RAM) did at one time and not try and claim that they are some thing they are not?
Jay G
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Old 04-04-2013, 06:34 PM   #35
MichaelLi OP
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May be you are right different regions with different rules, but for us we have been doing this for many years, haven't met the problems.

All of the bikes we shipped are old bikes, and they can get the legal registrations, totally no problem.

Just after the 2013 New Yearr, the other six bikes( s small container) arrived their new home in US successfully.




Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydmc View Post
I have spoken with customs officals in the USA who have had these crushed as they came in with out proper paper work. The paper work claimed that the new bikes were in fact old bikes. Even with false paper work the bikes still need to have DOT aproved wheels, tires, brakes, lights and more. To bring them in legal with out "fake" paper work they also need to meet EPA regulations. So while you may be able to bring them in some ports at others they will crush the bikes. Port of Seattle would have them crushed. Port of Tacoma less then 50 miles away more then likley you would not have problems. I have found this to be the case just bringing in sidecars. In the case of the sidecar. If the lights are installed on the sidecar no problem as lights are not required on sidecars. If however as is the case when we use to bring in Sputnik sidecars, if the lights are shipped with the sidecar and not installed then as you could be planing on installing the lights on some thing that requires DOT aproval they will not allow importation. I have spent a lot of money on lawyers dealing with customs on these issues and even had a senetor involved that US customs pretty much told him to go away that they can do what ever they want.
Bottom line, the bikes are not coming in legaly, you might get away with it, You might not. Would it not make more sense to do this right? Get proper certification like Ural did and even a Dnepr importer (RAM) did at one time and not try and claim that they are some thing they are not?
Jay G
DMC sidecars
866-638-1793
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Old 04-07-2013, 07:31 PM   #36
gspell68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikec101 View Post
Can the learned members advise me, would I be utterly insane to attempt to buy one of these in China and ride it home, to Ireland? (Ignoring for the moment potential licensing, customs, and export issues)

And if so, is utter insanity of that type really a bad thing? I'll guarantee a trip report with lots of pics.

How about the rebuilt CJs with a BMW engine put in them? I'm assuming there's still a lot that can go wrong, final drive etc, but at least the engine would be reliable.

I wouldn't be looking to do it for a few years, possibly five, but currently I'm not up to much mechanically on a bike (no problem learning though).

Or is it just a complete non runner of an idea? Better to get a modern Ural and do it? (Runs into it's own problems with the left vs right hand sidecar thing). I know logically it would make a lot more sense to get a newer, more reliable bike, and probably even scrap the sidecar idea, but when it comes to bikes I've always let my heart rule my head, and I'd love to have one of these bikes, plus the story on how I got it back, at home.
If you like to daydream about Rooskie bikes for sale in foreign lands, check out these links to the Polish version of eBay.
A little bit shorter drive to the UK. The exchange rate is a little more than 4 Zlotys to the Euro...

http://moto.allegro.pl/search.php?strin ... &country=1

http://moto.allegro.pl/search.php?strin ... &country=1

http://moto.allegro.pl/search.php?strin ... &country=1

http://moto.allegro.pl/search.php?strin ... &country=1

http://moto.allegro.pl/search.php?strin ... &country=1

http://moto.allegro.pl/search.php?strin ... &country=1
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1962 KMZ (Dnepr) K-750M
1959 IMZ (Ural) M-72M

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Old 04-07-2013, 07:51 PM   #37
gspell68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydmc View Post
I have spoken with customs officals in the USA who have had these crushed as they came in with out proper paper work. The paper work claimed that the new bikes were in fact old bikes. Even with false paper work the bikes still need to have DOT aproved wheels, tires, brakes, lights and more. To bring them in legal with out "fake" paper work they also need to meet EPA regulations. So while you may be able to bring them in some ports at others they will crush the bikes. Port of Seattle would have them crushed. Port of Tacoma less then 50 miles away more then likley you would not have problems. I have found this to be the case just bringing in sidecars. In the case of the sidecar. If the lights are installed on the sidecar no problem as lights are not required on sidecars. If however as is the case when we use to bring in Sputnik sidecars, if the lights are shipped with the sidecar and not installed then as you could be planing on installing the lights on some thing that requires DOT aproval they will not allow importation. I have spent a lot of money on lawyers dealing with customs on these issues and even had a senetor involved that US customs pretty much told him to go away that they can do what ever they want.
Bottom line, the bikes are not coming in legaly, you might get away with it, You might not. Would it not make more sense to do this right? Get proper certification like Ural did and even a Dnepr importer (RAM) did at one time and not try and claim that they are some thing they are not?
Jay G
DMC sidecars
866-638-1793
If they were made (or at least documented) before 1978 they are excluded from EPA and DOT requirements. That means no blinker, lights, brake, emissions, etc concerns. If they are more than 25 years old they can be exempted from the EPA and DOT regs.

And Lloyd at RAM was technically not a Dnepr importer. He was a an American motorcycle manufacturer because he had to rebuild the Dneprs to meet all the same requirements as any other American company such as H-D. RAM bikes will carry a data tag and MSO stating such.
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1962 KMZ (Dnepr) K-750M
1959 IMZ (Ural) M-72M
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:35 PM   #38
China2wheels
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydmc View Post
... "fake" paper work ... Bottom line, the bikes are not coming in legaly, you might get away with it, You might not. Would it not make more sense to do this right? Get proper certification like Ural did and even a Dnepr importer (RAM) did at one time and not try and claim that they are some thing they are not?
Jay G
DMC sidecars
866-638-1793
China - land of "fakes". Fake baby food, fake beef/lamb (actually rat meat), fake medicine, and virtually zero concern for any IPR. As for fake documents, they are so common that very few people in China actually believe what is written down.

You are dreaming if you believe that you are getting an "old" CJ750 with legitimate paperwork. Almost all of the CJs that are "restored" and sent abroad were made within the last decade, or so.

A pre-1978 bike is very rare, and commands a high price among collectors inside China - it wouldn't be used as a junker for "restoration". Those old bikes were also 6 Volt.

In China, there is a universal, mandatory scrapping law for motorcycles (sidecars included). They MUST be scrapped (crushed) after 11 years. That is the law. You cannot register/insure a bike older than 11 years. And you can NOT register your license plate on another bike UNTIL the old bike is turned over to the police and scrapped by the official police facility.

So, any old bikes that were somehow tucked away in a garage (unlikely since the owner probably wants the plate transfered) are rare, and Chinese collectors snap up whatever comes available. By the way, once a bike is older than 11 years, there is no way it can be registered.

So, DMC is totally correct, the "builders" here (I have lived in Beijing a long time), send these things out with fake paperwork. By the way, I (and anyone else) can easily acquire a full set of fake paperwork for any bike, for about $30, in Beijing.

This Is China.
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:43 PM   #39
Dan Alexander
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That is one strange law ... 11 years and off to the crusher

Why would they do such a thing, is the quality so bad that after 11 years they figure it's unsafe?
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Old 06-02-2013, 06:18 AM   #40
China2wheels
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Alexander View Post
That is one strange law ... 11 years and off to the crusher

Why would they do such a thing, is the quality so bad that after 11 years they figure it's unsafe?
Actually, CJ750 quality is so bad, even 5 years is a long time. However, with BMW, Ducati, Harley, etc now being sold in China, the government has just increased the "lifespan rule" to 13 years. This is China - not a lot makes sense.
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Old 09-11-2013, 06:18 AM   #41
Tigris_GER
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelLi View Post
...
It's the replica of WWII BMW r71 and R75, keep very original WWII BMW elements, changjiang is the third generation of it.
...

I am a little bit surprised at the moment that the Chang Jiang is advertised as a copy of WW II motorbike BMW R75. In fact it is a copy of BMW R71 which was produced from the early 1930ies until 1938 when BMW was ordered to stop the production of civilian motorbikes (including R71) and to concentrate on the production of military motorbikes such as the R75.

The BMW R71 was a pure civilian motorbike developed and produced in a time when Germany still accepted the restrictions of the Versailles Treat (after WW I) not to produce any military equipment.

The construction plans for the R71 went to Sowjet Union beginning of the 1940ies, most likely as a part of the Hitler-Stalin Treat although this is not really clear how they came to SU. In SU the motorbike was produced under the name M72 (No - "M" ist not the abbreviation of the SU Foreign Minister Molotov who signed the Hitler-Stalin Treat in the Name of SU but for the Russian word мотоцикл (motozikl) = motorbike). Later the SU government forwarded the plans to their socialist brothers in China.

In 1938 German government ordered German motorcycle producers to develop a pure military motorbike according to very detailed technical specifications. BMW tried to improve the R71 according to these specifications whilst German motorbike producer Zündapp developed a brand new motorbike, Zündapp KS750.

Zündapp won the competition and was awarded with the contract of the German government and BMW was ordered to produce the Zündapp KS 750 in BMW factories in license what they did under the name BMW R75.

Comparing BMW R75 and R71 but also M72 and Chang Jiang you can see that the concepts are totally different. The frame, the front fork etc. What they all make look similar is the characteristic look of the 2-cylinders boxer engine and the sidecar - and that´s it. Technically we are talking about different worlds.

Kind regards from Kabul
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Old 09-15-2013, 02:32 PM   #42
gspell68
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Yep.
R-71 tubular frames don't hold up well to off road beatings. The easiest way to tell a BMW R-71 from the Russian M-72 or Chinese CJ-750 is that the latter two re-inforced the rear gusset near the plungers. The very first upgrade the Soviets made to the M-72 was to change the rear suspension to a swingarm and call it a K-750.
And look at the German war bikes: the BMW R-12 and the Zundapp KS-750 both had stamped metal flex frames and the the BMW R-75 had modular, bolted-joint, sectional frames to withstand the rigors that a true, off-road tactical vehicles would've been exposed to...
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1962 KMZ (Dnepr) K-750M
1959 IMZ (Ural) M-72M
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