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Old 05-30-2013, 08:43 AM   #196
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Old 05-30-2013, 09:42 AM   #197
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have you any idea of price yet Roger?
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Old 05-30-2013, 07:05 PM   #198
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Originally Posted by mouthfulloflake View Post
have you any idea of price yet Roger?
Good question. It's not decided yet but we'd like to keep it in the ballpark of BoosterPlug even though it is substantially more circuitry and complexity internally.
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Old 06-02-2013, 10:12 PM   #199
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Narrow Band O2 Sensor Shift Device Beta Test Report

June 2, 2013, prepared by Happy Wanderer

I’ve returned from a 4,000+ mile beta test of Roger04RT’s narrowband O2 sensor shifting device on my 2000 R1100RT. Roger put one together for the 1100RT that was plug and play for beta testing purposes. Installation involved removing the right side fairing panel, unplugging the O2 sensor connector and plugging his device in series with existing connectors. Unlike the 1150 there is no ground wire required and installing it couldn’t be simpler. The device itself was placed under my seat on top of the air box for easy access. A 2mm hex tool, a few cable ties, resetting the ECU and about an hour is all that is required. The unit was installed on a well tuned stock bike known to be surging and averaging ~41 miles per US gallon.
I did some initial local testing initially at both recommended test settings which were:
F6 = 14.15 / 1 AFR or 4% enrichment
F7 = 13.8 / 1 AFR or 6% enrichment
Both settings produce noticeable changes and improvements. Initially I found F7 produced better results but long distance testing proved that F6 gave a better balance of performance and mileage improvements once adaptation by the ECU was allowed to complete.

Riding Observations:
- The first thing I noticed was in low gears (1, 2, and 3). Steady throttle in these gears typically produce a lot of annoying “hunting” or surging which results in a jerky ride. This was smoothed out significantly with the device.
- Roll on throttle performance is greatly improved especially in the higher gears. The wonderful thing about this is that you can put through those small towns in 4th or even 5th gear without the usual complaints from a big twin engine. Goodbye jerky, surging ride through small towns.
- Available torque at low speeds in the higher gears is also much better. This allows you to slow down without shifting gears and then pull away again in a smooth controlled fashion. I normally downshift at around 3,000 RPM but found myself and bike quite comfortable down at 2,000 and even lower in some cases. When I noticed this I was quite surprised so I went riding around some back streets where traffic was light to nonexistent and tried it again several times. There is definitely a lot more smooth acceleration power available at low RPM. No pinging, no complaint from the engine at all, it just rolls on and away you go.
- The transition from on and off throttle is also smoother. This is great when adjusting your speed in traffic. The throttle is less snatchy.
- The fuel cutoff lurch you feel on an 1100 around 1500 to 1700 RPM as you come to a stop in gear is less pronounced. Still there but not as harsh.
Mileage Data:
My former average was 41 mpg. The data I collected over 4,000+ miles of riding shows it is now 44.6 mpg or 2.4% better on average.
Noteworthy points in the data: (see table below)
- Change in performance from the 7 setting to the leaner 6 setting
- Mileage improving over time during the first several days (Motronic 2.2 ECU adapting)
- Performance at high altitude desert conditions (Utah and Arizona) is just excellent.


To summarize the riding test I would say my bike is much happier running a slightly richer mixture. And happy bike = happy wanderer. J Although the surging is not completely gone as has been experienced and documented on the 1150 it is reduced to a much more manageable level. I am highly suspicious that this is due to my fuel injectors not being perfectly matched but having them cleaned again and re tested will have to wait until much later in the riding season or perhaps when I am gone on one of the other bikes for a couple of weeks!
Oh and one more important comment. I have to remove the beta and send it back to Roger now…
And I am NOT happy about that one bit!

I should also add that I've tested and ridden thousands of miles with two other fuel enrichment devices that were connected to the air temperature sensor. Neither of these provide lasting results since the ECU software is designed to get your engine back to 14.7 / 1 AFR so eventually the effects of air temp sensor mods are nullified. This approach is much more effective because it uses the O2 sensor feedback loop to get the ECU to enrichen the mixture using it's own built in controls based on O2 sensor input which is being modified. The results are clear and backed up with solid data.
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:58 AM   #200
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Great report HW!
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:38 PM   #201
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Part 1 of 4

Earlier in this thread, Terry posted on the installation of dual LC-1s on his 2011 R1200GSA. Since that time he's ridden thousands of miles but importantly, has continued to log air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) and engine data by using the LC-1s and a GS-911 in tandem. I've digested several of his test rides into four charts that I'll explain in four posts. The BMSK has some very good features that solve problems of the Motronic MA 2.2 and 2.4.

R1100s and R1150s use two generations (or three if you include dual-spark) of Motronics for controlling spark timing and fueling. Each of those systems works with one O2 sensor that is placed in a spot where it measures the average oxygen content of the exhaust. The R1200 has two O2 sensors (and knock sensing) which supply additional data to its engine control unit called the BMSK.

On an R1200, the BMSK manages two mostly independent Closed Loop programs. This means that it can nearly perfectly balance the left and right cylinders. This is an important feature that essentially eliminates surging. On 1100/1150s we meticulously balance air with TB syncs and valve adjustments but have to ignore fuel imbalances. Not so on the 1200, using its two O2 sensors it can easily equalize fuel, keeping left/right power (air plus fuel) equal—no surging, and a smoother engine. On 1100/1150s your choices are to clean and measure your injectors for balance or to add a few percent more fuel so that all the oxygen gets burned, making fuel imbalances less important, diminishing surging and making the engine smoother.

Although this is an Oilhead forum I feel that some of the insights from the R1200 will be beneficial to R1150 and R1100 riders too. So to that end Terry disconnected one of this two O2 sensors, reset his BMSK so we could see what things look like before Adaptation cleans-up the left/right cylinder differences and then reconnected the O2 and watched what happened (next post). He also made a short test ride with an O2 sensor disconnected to see what happened when an O2 failed.

One O2 Disconnected, BMSK Reset, Cold Start
Using the LC-1s, Terry's AFR has been programmed 7% rich and therefore his AFR runs around 13.6:1. In the left-hand LC-1 chart below take a look at the connected cylinder's AFR (purple line). One of the first things you can see is that the R1200 gets into Closed Loop operation very fast, only needing about 20 seconds or so (my 2004 RT takes a few minutes to warm enough to run Closed Loop). If you look very closely at the chart there is a difference between the purple and black lines at startup--about 4% AFR difference. Terry's bike is well tuned (TB Balanced and Valves) so I believe is the natural AFR imbalance of his motorcycle, a combination of a small fuel and a small air imbalance. This natural imbalance is interesting because it could easily exist on any 1100/1150, we just wouldn't know it.

The cylinder without an O2 is running pretty rich, in part because he has an air-temperature shift device adding 6% and in part because there is a slowly declining warmup enrichment (notice the injection time coming down), but also because without an O2 on one cylinder the BMSK seems to be leaving a margin of error toward the rich.

Looking on the right hand chart, which is GS-911 data over the same time period as the LC-1 chart on the left, you can see the base injection time (blue line). When cold the pulses are about 4.5 mS long and within 20-30 seconds they have been reduced to 2.5 mS. The same base time is used for both cylinders but there are also two LCFs (Lambda Correction Factors), one for each cylinder. Looking at the red line you can see that the Closed Loop program which creates the LCFs reduces the fueling to about 82% of the base time. The disconnect cylinder doesn't have any way to calculate an LCF and it stays at 100% and that cylinder remains rich.

The key takeaways here are: fast warm-up with O2 connected, 4% difference between the cylinders with no Closed Loop correction and the LCFs which are the short term Adaptation Values that I've mentioned before in this thread. Later there will be some charts showing long term Adaptation. You can also see what's going to happen in the short term if you lose an O2 sensor.

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Old 06-05-2013, 06:56 AM   #202
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Part 2 of 4

In Part 1 we saw the 4% initial imbalance between the left and right cylinders of Terry's 2011 R1200GSA and then what happened in Open Loop with only one of the O2 sensors attached. The LCFs (lambda control factors) also showed how the BMS-K calculates its Adaptation Values. Next is how the injection time and both LCFs interact when the second O2 sensor is reconnected.

Reconnected #2 oxygen sensor
Looking at the lefthand side of the first chart below, at about 9:02 (point labeled 1) the second oxygen sensor is reconnected. It only takes about 15 seconds for the BMSK to smoothly compute the second cylinder LCF and lock Closed Loop, and in the process make a 14% fueling correction. If you look closely at the LCFs on the righthand side, they are 8% apart, more than immediately after being reset (about 4% at the start of the chart in post 1 on this topic). I don't have an explanation for this difference.

At point 2, the throttle is blipped, the BMSK sets both LCFs to 1.00 (it's in Open Loop mode) and you can see that the AFRs both go rich, but one is richer and the richness lasts longer. Later, when the BMSK has fully adapted, I'll show that both cylinders are nearly perfectly AFR equalized. The BMSK is simply amazing.




Looking at the chart below, the lefthand LCF graph is the same as above, but the righthand graph shows what's happening with the idle stepper motors (which seem to run in sync in the data I have on hand). What the BMSK does next, knowing that it has both O2s running, is to begin normalizing other aspects of its operation. First notice in the LCF graph on the left that both LCFs head together several percent richer. Since almost everything else has stayed the same (spark timing, RPM and TPS), why is the BMSK Closed Loop routine requiring more fuel (as seen in the LCF trend upward)?

The simple answer is that just before connecting the second O2 sensor, the average of the two LCFs was 0.92 (1.00 vs 0.84). After the second O2 is plugged and its LCF has adjusted, the average LCF (on the right of the chart) is 0.86, less fuel on average to hold the idle at around 1150.

The other interesting thing going on is that the idle stepper motor value is dropping. It looks like when both cylinders are balanced by the Closed Loop programs, both O2 sensors running, it takes less fuel (average LCF lower) and less air (idle motors lower).

So there's the Cold Start sequence and the role of O2 sensors, idle stepper motors and the BMSK's symphonic handling of its sensors and the LCFs (Adaptations). I believe that this is relevant to Motronic MA 2.2 and 2.4s (1100s/1150s) because there are things like this going on inside those ECUs as well. I hope this helps to illustrate the types of processes in Closed Loop that are more visible on the BMSK.

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Old 06-05-2013, 07:23 AM   #203
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Part 3 of 4

Test Ride on One O2 Sensor
On one of the tests, Terry left the cylinder 2 O2 sensor disconnect and went out for a ride to see what would happen. He told me that he barely made it out of the driveway the bike was running so roughly. And that's no surprise, one of his cylinders was in Closed Loop and running an AFR of 13.65:1 and the other was Open Loop and running and AFR of 11.4:1, hugely richer.

He persevered though and got out for about 10 minutes of mismatched torture before he reconnected cylinder two's O2 sensor.

The chart below shows about 6 minutes of that ride. It is remarkable. If you look closely, you can see that cylinder two's Open Loop fueling starts to converge towards Cylinder one's Closed Loop fueling. How is that happening? I can't be 100% certain without more tests but it seems pretty clear that the BMSK is using data from cylinder one's Closed Loop to estimate the fueling needed by cylinder 2. Wow!

A more important thing to note is the enormous variation in fueling when there is no O2 sensor. Cylinder one's fueling is tight to 13.65:1 whereas cylinder two's fueling varies grossly between 11.4 and 13.65. I saw this exact behavior on the R1150's Motronic and expect it would be the same on R1100s (except when an Open Loop coding plug was used). This certainly appears to be BMW/Bosch's Limp Home fueling strategy--significantly vary the mixture and hope that the catalytic converter gathers some oxygen during the lean peaks so it can function at times.

Running one cylinder with O2 and one without turned out to be a great way to show what happens when you run BMW motorcycles in Open Loop. There is a huge takeaway here: If you disconnect the O2 sensors and add a Power Commander V, you will run on the Limp Home fueling pattern and lose all the features that I've shown in these first three posts.

On the 1100s and 1150s, Power Commander has a Wideband O2 sensor so the behavior is different but as I will explain in a few days, not really optimal. (LGW loaned my a PC III USB with Wideband and I've made some tests against the LC-1.)

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Old 06-05-2013, 07:41 AM   #204
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Part 4 of 4

R1200GSA Fully Adapted Demonstration Ride
On his way home from HelnBack, after about 20-30 hours of riding, Terry logged his AFRs for several hours. Below is about 1 1/2 minutes of one of the segments so you can see the degree to which the BMSK has adapted the AFRs of his two cylinders to be equal. They are nearly carbon copies of one another. I continue to be amazed by how well the BMSK manages the motorcycle.

While the chart pretty much speaks for itself, here are some notes:
--The tall peaks are Overrun Fuel Cutoff during deceleration. Note how well and how quickly the BMSK gets the engine back to its target AFR--13.65:1 in Terry's case using the LC-1s.

--The acceleration AFR dips which varied prior to adaptation in the post 2 of this series are very uniform. Even during acclereation, the AFRs track. The richest mixtures are about 11.8:1 (richer than a stock bike because of Adaptation to his 13.65 Closed Loop target).

--About the leanest the BMSK puts the mixture is about 15:1 during normal deceleration (in other words, not Overrun Cutoff). This would approach 16:1 on a stock bike as its target Closed Loop would be leaner. Also keep in mind that nowhere in the hours of logs Terry sent was there a leaner than target fueling during cruise or acceleration. If during Dyno runs, you see grossly lean AFRs recorded it is most likely due to the Dyno's Wideband AFR gauge in the tailpipe.

So that's it, probably too much detail but I hope that we all know more about how the BMW ECUs work. A big thank you from me to Terry for accumulating this data. Nice work!

RB


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Old 06-05-2013, 10:30 AM   #205
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Another narrowband O2 shift device test

I also had the opportunity to test Roger's narrowband O2 shift device. Here's my writeup:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=893170
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Old 06-05-2013, 05:02 PM   #206
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Very well done Roger, I really appreciate the effort involved, the detailed explanation of the charts and the insight regarding the BMSK controlling our motors. I have learned a ton.

And thank you for the kind words but all I did was ride, ride, ride. Enjoyed every mile of it.

Eric (EKinOR), wonderful write up, excellent. I hope you do not mind this quote from your thread:

"First, I want to say I hated having to remove it from my bike at the end of the test period. I will absolutely buy one when they become available."

Gotta say Eric, you are in Oregon, Roger is in Mass., I doubt he would come and get it. JUST KIDDING.

Ride safely, more to come I am sure.

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Old 06-05-2013, 11:45 PM   #207
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terryckdbf View Post
Gotta say Eric, you are in Oregon, Roger is in Mass., I doubt he would come and get it. JUST KIDDING.
Now you tell me...

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Old 06-09-2013, 05:14 AM   #208
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Last weekend a package arrived from a forum colleague who has decided to install the Innovate Motorsports MTX-L on his 2003 R1150RT. The MTX-L is an LC-1 and water-resistant gauge in a single package. It should perform just like the LC-1.

Inside the package was a Power Commander III USB with Wideband O2 sensor that was being replaced by the MTX-L. I've been eager to test the PC III for a while since on paper it seemed like a plug & play option for mixture richening. After running it for three days, it is an option, but I wasn't impressed.

Here are my notes:
1) The Closed loop lambda error of its Wideband was large. To get a closed loop of 13.8 you needed to program 14.4. Its programming was 14.2 when it arrived here which means it was actually at about 13.6. This is consistent with the carbon on the sensor when it arrived. I spoke to tech support at Dynojet about this. They said the unit self calibrated but clearly it didn't. To me, 0.3 afr would be the largest acceptable error, it was off by 0.8 afr.

2) The PC III BMW fuel table is a unique product. Unlike any other PC III it has Closed Loop and Open Loop fuel table cells. The Cells in the Closed Loop area are disabled. This leads to the complex problem that the Motronic through adaptation will add to open loop what it adds to closed loop. That is not documented. It means before deciding what values to add to the Open Loop cells you must wait for the Motronic to finish adapting. Of course there's no way to know when that happens.

It would be better if all cells in the fuel table were programmable. Then if you were moving afr 6% plus 4% for E10, you would enter +10 into the closed loops cells and adaptation would be minimal. The way it works you could have an invisible 10% added to Open Loop through adaptation and then be adding fuel on top of that! It is as confusing as it sounds.

The Closed Loop area defined by the PC and the Motronic are likely different. I communicated with PC tech support about this and they acknowledged it. As long as the PC area is bigger than the Motronic area it's not much of a problem but I couldn't confirm that.

3) The software is unique, has no upgrades, support or documentation. Here is what PC said, "You are correct, in that there is not an available firmware update for your type of Power Commander. It is a unique unit, and unlike all of the other standard Power Commander 3 usb units. It also is not compatible with any of the accessories like LCD, Quickshifter, etc."

4) It is truly plug and play and only took me 10 minutes to install since I have a second O2 bung and since my O2 connector was relocated so that it's not under the fuel tank. That said, you double the number of connectors for the TPS and each FI and need to take a lot of care dressing them so they don't interfere with the throttle linkage.

5) There is no AFR datalogging software as with the LC-1.

I was excited about the possibilities of the PC III for BMW with Wideband O2 but came away feeling that it is really two separate products that aren't well integrated or supported.
RB
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:56 AM   #209
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Roger, it is really nice to see some analysis of the PCIII on the 1150. Empirically, I know it makes my bike run better but I was always suspicious of the programming since every time I would ask questions at Dynojet they would say, "Oh, BMW 1150....hmm...we really don't know how it works".

I wonder, however, if the O2 sensor on the one you tested was going bad? Did you try it with a newer sensor? One of the things that I don't like about the PCIII is that it doesn't use the heater circuit for the O2 sensor, which could result in some error and sooting up of the sensor. When I got mine, the sensor was pretty sooty and I cleaned it as best I could without chemicals.

Looks like I'm buying another LC-1, unless your box is coming soon...
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Old 06-10-2013, 09:22 AM   #210
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One other thing - Roger, you should summarize all your research and findings and write an article for the BMWMOA Owner's News magazine. I'm sure there would be a lot of interest.
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