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Old 03-24-2013, 10:40 PM   #316
stevepsd
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In reviewing the video and comments in this thread, I wonder if having a steering stabilizer (Scotts, etc) would have helped prevent the front/rear from stepping out so quickly?

I run a Scotts on my KTM and XR and it helps with damping front end especially (and rear wheel) deflections, comes in especially handy when hitting completely covered boulders in sand washes.

Just a thought.
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Old 04-06-2013, 06:46 PM   #317
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Glad you are ok Joe
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Old 04-07-2013, 09:35 AM   #318
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Had to read this entire thread before watching the vid. Humbling. Thanks for sharing Joe. As for ride analysis, you've obviously got the skills and the only thing to do differently would be a smoother line and you already said either a stop and scout or further right. More throttle or speed don't apply when a bike's weight and the terrain overwhelm the suspension.

Apart from the riding and the scenery, what seemed most familiar was everything that followed the crash. Is there a word other than humility that captures that state of mind?

Guess I'll have to look up this "TAT" ride. I always thought running the Tat meant the Tatshenshini.

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Originally Posted by joefromsf View Post
Well, it pretty much survived, but there were some gremlins. See http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...1&postcount=86 and http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...7&postcount=91.
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Old 04-19-2013, 06:06 PM   #319
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Hey Joe,

There has been a lot of chatter, speculation and arm chair quarter backing going on about this in other forums. I made it through page 7.

Bottom line, shit happens. This could happen to anyone. You could have and would have, but wrecks come with riding a bike. Great vid, glad you survived. DR's are bad ass. So are you. Ride on brother.
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Old 04-24-2013, 07:56 PM   #320
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Very happy you made it out of that without serious injury.

Been there twice myself. Once overshot a hill on my xt550 in a big way. Bit oh shit moment and landed both wheels 12 feet down. Ass hurt a bit, but I did bend the sub frame with it.

Second time was snowboarding with a relatively fast friend of mine ridding ski's. I was keeping up our last run of the day till it got a bit steep. Decided to slow it down a bit and caught a nice edge. Superman flight into the air I still remember to this day. I'd guess about a 10-15foot drop right back to hard pack. Remember all the way up to just before impact and checking that my arms were where I wanted them, hands out so no broken wrists, legs straight enough behind me that I wouldn't hurt much. Next was getting up, I hadn't slid that far after impact. Goggles broke my nose, good scrape on my forehead and cheeks, belt buckle gave me a good knock to the waist and the breath completely knocked from me. I was able to get to my knee's, but took about 5 minutes to be able to move from there. I know that kinda internal shock you can get and don't wish it upon anyone. Buddy wanted to go for another run when I finally made it down

Very happy to see you keep going on, you were blessed that day.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:24 PM   #321
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That was scary!

Glad you are ok Joe! When I started riding off the pavement, in the 1950s, the mantra was to "crash on the other side of the obstacle." Then I got into observed trials; the obstacles got a lot bigger and I discovered that it hurt too much to "crash on the other side of the obstacle." So I trained myself to be able to stop on top on the obstacle - with the forward momentum dissipated, I had time to decide how to proceed. Now that I'm old and out of shape, that tactic comes in very handy! Good luck on future explorations!
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:43 PM   #322
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OMG! Man, you were one lucky guy to be pretty much unscathed after that wreck. I wrecked my bike back in January going 5mph, and broke two ribs and severely strained my collarbone/shoulder so bad, I thought it was broke! What kind of protection for your ribs were you wearing? I am going to invest in it. Glad you made it out alive.
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Old 06-02-2013, 08:32 PM   #323
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Dang man you made me jump out of seat when you went over the cliff. Scared the sh#@ out me. I just knew you was a goner. Glad your okay though, now we get to see some more heart stopping videos.
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Old 06-04-2013, 08:44 AM   #324
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Some things inspired by the thread:

I guess most of us know that feeling -- the moment of no return, this is going to cause some damage, etc. But I doubt many of us have experienced it quite like that.

I know so well that full-body-blow stunned feeling. It's really hard to describe -- another poster mentioned his snow-boarding accident. In the old northern myths, they'd say you were whelmed with great force. It's just about paralyzing even if you don't break anything. I looped a fully-loaded KLR on a water bar in Vermont a few summers ago and landed square on my ass/hip/kidney; all I could do for 5 minutes was roll around and groan. My riding buddy thought I was milking it -- until a day later when I showed him the eggplant bruise on my ass that was about the size of a turkey-tray.

Never yet have I scheduled a long trip -- the most we've done is 10 days. But even after a day or two, a kind of fatigue can creep up on you. It's the opposite of being over-excited and forgetting that you're way out in the willy-wags, gunning it too much. There are whole sections of trail that I have no memory of at the end of the day -- even if you are totally concentrating, your mind wears out, dumps data, dozes a little.

And that reminds me of just how much mental state has to do with successful riding. I've had to let a friend ride my bike over a section at the end of the day that I could do in a second in the morning. On our last trip, I was riding the aforementioned KLR and my friends were on WR250's. It's around 330 when the difference between wrestling a 650 through muddy waterbogs and wet woods trails and doing the same on a 250 really starts to show up. Had to have one of the guys tackle a 20 yard wet slash and roots climb because my brain was just too worn out to confront the thought of having to pick that fucker up one more time if I dumped it.

Your having been sick -- enough to lay up for a day -- HAD to have been a factor, maybe a major one, in this crash. I don't think you froze -- I just think your brain didn't catch up to the reality of the moment fast enough. You seemed to me to be moving like a guy who thought 1) he could save it and 2) had time and space to do so. You were over the cliff before your brain caught up to the action. I bet 9/10 or ever 19/20 times you make that climb with no trouble. Mindspace just matters so much in riding and fatigue is a sneaky bitch.

Crashing on the trail: Our last big one, we were three. That's a good number; one to stay, one to fetch. We too were bailed by a well-prepared EMS crew from the nearest town -- they had an "Argo" to stretcher my buddy out on (spiral fracture, tibia), and a "dispersed wilderness EMT" who arrived on the scene with his kit about 45minutes after we called it in. The year before we were only two and I had a serious moment of panic when the other guy biffed it over an unseen rock on a logging road (we were going too fast). Thankfully, he was just angry, not hurt.

Last thought: boy does luggage make a difference or what? Mine's 2 different bikes depending upon the load.

Good job on not dying. I'm really happy to hear that you're still in the game.
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Old 06-04-2013, 09:56 AM   #325
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Originally Posted by Woodenveins View Post
Dang man you made me jump out of seat when you went over the cliff. Scared the sh#@ out me. I just knew you was a goner. Glad your okay though, now we get to see some more heart stopping videos.

no kidding... my stomach turned for a sec...



glad you are ok!!!!
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Old 06-04-2013, 10:12 AM   #326
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Wow! Epic video. Glad that you are Ok.
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Old 06-07-2013, 11:14 PM   #327
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I'm a Paramedic Fire Fighter. Your video made me nauseated. I've been in this business for 20+ years and have done and seen many things but it still gets to me if I'm present to watch an accident occure. Arriving after is easy but to witness is a different emotion. So glad your okay.
What he said and what countless others have said. I was nauseated until about page 12! I am in medical sales and have seen lots of gory bits and pieces, but watching it happen from the GoPro made me pretty sick. I felt like I was you.

It actually surprised me that the video made me sick because I have watched surgeries and all and did not get sick. Hearing you moan and seeing what you saw was a bit much. I thought for sure at the beginning that you had a broken ankle or leg the way you were clutching your leg.

I do have a question for you, were you surprised at how the SPOT 911 call was responded to? I was expecting a flight out, not a 70-90 minute wait for a quad and a backboard. I wonder what kind of response you would have had if your riding partner had not gone to the highway and dialed 911 on a cell phone. Is that what brought the local response? If it had been a 911 SPOT message only would they have checked with the locals to see if they could assist in which case the response probably would have been the same as what you actually received?


Also, did you have to pay for the SPOT 911 service at all? I carry the insurance for that in case I would need to use it, but sure as hell hope I don't ever need to. Also need to reevaluate how/where to carry my SPOT. Guess I better read up again on what my SPOT 911 gets me.

Thanks for sharing.
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atokad screwed with this post 06-08-2013 at 08:01 AM
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Old 06-08-2013, 08:50 AM   #328
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atokad View Post
...
I do have a question for you, were you surprised at how the SPOT 911 call was responded to? I was expecting a flight out, not a 70-90 minute wait for a quad and a backboard. I wonder what kind of response you would have had if your riding partner had not gone to the highway and dialed 911 on a cell phone. Is that what brought the local response? If it had been a 911 SPOT message only would they have checked with the locals to see if they could assist in which case the response probably would have been the same as what you actually received?
...
I'm not familiar with how SPOT calls 911, but I can tell you with certainty that SPOT is not going to dispatch a helicopter. All 911 calls are ultimately routed through the local dispatch center, and local emergency services are dispatched. Med flight dispatch requires a specific request by First Responders or Ambulance crew, and that's probably not going to happen until the first responders are on scene and have assessed that life is at stake.
Surprising to most people, there are a lot of circumstances where a flight just can't or won't happen...weather and terrain are huge factors. And in remote circumstances in rugged terrain, such as this one, you're probably waiting for something like a quad and backboard no matter what; even if a med flight is warranted, you'll likely need to be first transported to a suitable landing zone via ambulance, quad or even hand-carry.

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Old 06-08-2013, 02:06 PM   #329
atokad
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Originally Posted by Lutz View Post
I'm not familiar with how SPOT calls 911, but I can tell you with certainty that SPOT is not going to dispatch a helicopter. All 911 calls are ultimately routed through the local dispatch center, and local emergency services are dispatched. Med flight dispatch requires a specific request by First Responders or Ambulance crew, and that's probably not going to happen until the first responders are on scene and have assessed that life is at stake.
Surprising to most people, there are a lot of circumstances where a flight just can't or won't happen...weather and terrain are huge factors. And in remote circumstances in rugged terrain, such as this one, you're probably waiting for something like a quad and backboard no matter what; even if a med flight is warranted, you'll likely need to be first transported to a suitable landing zone via ambulance, quad or even hand-carry.
I was mainly thinking that such a remote area would would warrant a flight if 911 were dispatched via a Spot. If it had been an immediate life threatening situation, it seems to me that the ground response of 70-90 minutes was kind of long. I don't know the area but perhaps to dispatch the flight team and chopper may have been just as long.

Joe, still curious if the billed you for any of it and if they did, did you have the SPOT insurance??

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Old 06-08-2013, 03:54 PM   #330
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Quote:
I'm not familiar with how SPOT calls 911, but I can tell you with certainty that SPOT is not going to dispatch a helicopter. All 911 calls are ultimately routed through the local dispatch center, and local emergency services are dispatched. Med flight dispatch requires a specific request by First Responders or Ambulance crew, and that's probably not going to happen until the first responders are on scene and have assessed that life is at stake.
Surprising to most people, there are a lot of circumstances where a flight just can't or won't happen...weather and terrain are huge factors. And in remote circumstances in rugged terrain, such as this one, you're probably waiting for something like a quad and backboard no matter what; even if a med flight is warranted, you'll likely need to be first transported to a suitable landing zone via ambulance, quad or even hand-carry.
Unfortunately, true. Group I know was riding with a person who had a medical emergency (not bike related). Multiple spot 911s and new InReach (two way text) requests for air evac. Unfortunately it took the first responders 2 hours to get there and at that point there wasn't anything left to do Pretty tough experience for all those involved.

Something to keep in mind when on remote travels.
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