ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-11-2013, 12:00 PM   #46
mefadv
Studly Adventurer
 
mefadv's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2011
Location: Wickenburg AZ
Oddometer: 700
Looks like another great time on a Hodaka... Put lot's of miles on them Li'l boogers.
__________________
Mark, a Misplaced Farm Boy....
XR400, plated
mefadv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 07:51 PM   #47
DocAxeYarYar
RideDualSport.com
 
DocAxeYarYar's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Oddometer: 749
Toad on the TAT

Loving the ride report and your sheer grit and determination! Its awesome you put a lot of work and love into the Road Toad, and making great use of it to explore and take in the sights.

Your bringing back many fond memories of my TAT trip, my first epic DS trip.

Keep on truckin!
__________________
My XR650R Build:
http://ridedualsport.com/forum/index.php?topic=2748.0
DocAxeYarYar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 08:50 PM   #48
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Day Seven



There would be no fording of the Mulberry River on the TAT today.

Ozark to Adair, OK
The skies were cloudy and threatening as I headed into the White Rock Wildlife Management area of the Ozark National Forest. I was soon off the pavement and into the woods enjoying the scenery when I rode down an embankment to what appeared to be a creek crossing. As I got closer, I realized that this was no shallow creek that the Toad was capable of fording. Instead, it was the Mulberry River, running high and fast, several feet deep across the trail. It did not matter what anyone was riding, there was no way to make it across the river today. Using the GPS, I was able to backtrack and loop around to Highway 23, which would have a bridge over the river. Following the highway north to the town of Cass, I found a forest service road just across the bridge that allowed me to head back to the west and intercept the TAT. I did not know it at the time, but detours would be the theme for the day’s ride. Actually, I did not mind this at all, as I found that trying to calculate detours was challenging and fun. Once back on the forest service roads, I was treated to some great riding. There were a few rocky uphills and one steep and narrow downhill that was similar to riding down a staircase, which made me appreciate the small size of the Toad. The trails were not crowded like the day before, and I am sure the fact that it was Sunday morning had a lot to do with it. As I buzzed down the trails outside of Mountainburg, I noticed people unloading their horses out of two trailers for a day’s ride. I always slow to a crawl in situations like this, hoping that I will not spook the horses or draw the ire of the riders. This strategy seemed to work today, as the horses generally ignored me and the riders waved. Less than a mile down the road from the riders was a ROAD CLOSED AHEAD sign. Oh well, slowly ride ahead and check to see if there is any way around. Not today, heavy equipment and a fence blocked all routes around a bridge that was being built. It was time to find a way around another obstacle. Unfortunately, I had to ride past the horses again, and I am a sure they were wondering what I was up to by this point. I soon found another forest service road that roughly paralleled the one that is the TAT. The idea was to follow this road until I found another that crossed and headed south, allowing me to intercept and get back on the TAT. About five more miles in, I found such a road and took it. The GPS showed that I was less than a mile from reaching the TAT when this road too was blocked and closed by a logging operation. It was time to backtrack and try again. I eventually found a road that allowed me to get back down to the TAT, but the detour was a long one, over 12 miles total. My first detour was around 11 miles, so the additional 23 miles traveled meant that I was going to have to look for fuel before my planned stop. No problem, I thought, the town of Mountainburg is coming up, and they will certainly have a gas station there. Well, they did, at one time. The big Conoco truck stop on I-540 was now closed. I backtracked back into town and asked a fellow outside a building where the nearest gas station was. He pointed to the top of the next mountain down the highway. Five miles later and about an 800 foot climb in elevation, we had our fuel, but the Toad had to earn it.
After meeting Donna for lunch in Lincoln, Arkansas, it was time to cross over to Oklahoma. On the smallest back roads, there is often no welcome sign or anything to signify that you have crossed over to the next state, so the only clue is that the license plates on the cars that you see parked have changed. If someone had just dropped me off in this area, I would have never guessed I was in Oklahoma. This part of the state has lots of water and vegetation. The TAT runs alongside the Illinois River for awhile, and you will see people swimming and rafting and enjoying the natural beauty of the area. My brother-in-law Skip and his wife Frances from Tulsa met us in Adair and escorted us to an RV park outside of town. Once set up there, we followed the cryptic directions of the park owner to a”secret” steakhouse at the Salina Raceway. For whatever reason, the steakhouse was closed, so we joined the rest of the town of Salina at the “Pig ‘N Out” Barbeque for burgers, the only game in town.
232 miles traveled today. 1,551 miles total on the trip. The Toad still lives.



Forest Service Road, Western Ozarks
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 08:56 PM   #49
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Photos, Day Seven



Near Mountainburg, AR



Crossing the Illinois River near Scraper, OK
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 09:03 PM   #50
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Photos, Day Seven



Eastern Oklahoma Creek Crossing




Lake Hudson, near Salina, OK
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 09:07 PM   #51
zenjen
Go Outside
 
zenjen's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Quartz Mtn. West end of the Wichitas
Oddometer: 2,597
Diggin' your ride report! - I purchased my first bike at 14 years of age in '72, it was a '71 ACE 100B.
zenjen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2013, 09:13 PM   #52
Skowinski
Chordate
 
Skowinski's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Mojave Desert
Oddometer: 4,694
Cool report! Your bike goes back to the days when I was ape shit about motorcycles, my teenage years, 1970's (not much has changed ). It's awesome to see someone making a trip like this on one of those bikes today.
__________________

"Nature never hurries, yet everything is accomplished."
- Lao Tsu


In memory of Nika: http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=990697
Skowinski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 06:34 PM   #53
SuchesRider
Just Do It!
 
SuchesRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 1,672
You go Andy! Keep on Hodakin'! SR
__________________
Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.

SuchesRider screwed with this post 06-12-2013 at 07:12 PM
SuchesRider is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:19 PM   #54
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Day Eight


Just outside Adair, OK. Slow down or speed up?

Day Eight
Adair to Alva, OK
Whenever you read ride reports about the portion of the TAT through central Oklahoma, riders talk about the issues they have with the mud. I had this in mind when I set out this morning, especially since Oklahoma had been battered by storms the previous weeks that had dumped rain in this part of the state. With all of maybe 10 horsepower at my disposal, there was no way that I was going to attempt to plow my way through any of these quagmires, I was just going to have to find a way around them. About 30 miles down the trail from Adair there is a swampy area around the Verdigris where it feeds Lake Oologah. The portion of the TAT that normally runs by this swamp was now under water for at least 400 yards coming from the east. Even if I made it through this mudhole, who knows what it would have been like even closer to the river? Since most of these rural dirt roads in the plains states are laid out on a grid, it is easy to find your way around the obstacle. I was able to backtrack to Highway 60, which put me back on the TAT outside of Nowata. As I was fueling in Nowata, I had a pleasant discussion with a couple of local ladies who wanted to take pictures of the Toad. One of them said that her husband had owned a Super Rat, and she just had to show him a picture of the green Hodaka someone was riding through town.
As you “ride the grids” in the plains, it is easy to get complacent. The roads of the TAT can stretch on for dozens of miles, straight as an arrow. It was on one of these stretches outside of Nowata, NS 413, I believe, that reminded me to pay better attention. One moment the road was straight, level and well groomed, but over the next rise the road dropped away into a narrow, rough rocky chute that had me hard on the brakes, sliding down the hill, skidding to a stop just before splashing into a creek that was several feet deep. It took me a moment to get my heart rate down before I could ride back up the hill and look for a way around the creek. Of course, I was angry at myself for allowing this close call to happen. I was not paying attention for only a moment, but sometimes a moment is all it takes.
Another re-route that I had to take that day was near Hulah Lake west of Copan. The lake was high and the water was over the road as far as I could see down the trail at the southwest corner of the lake. I had to backtrack and head southwest to Highway 99 and that allowed me to loop around and get back on the TAT. After the Hulah Reservoir, the TAT takes you up into Kansas and into the little town of Elgin. As you approach the town, signs proclaim that Elgin is the town that was “too tough to die.” At the end of the 19th century, Elgin was one of the largest cattle shipping towns in the US, but now its population is only 89 souls. The streets are wide and made out of brick. You can tell it must have been something in its day.
West of Elgin, you ride into the Osage Indian Reservation and by the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. I was hoping to get a buffalo to pose next to the Toad, but it must have been their day off. It was then into Newkirk for some fuel and then on to Alva for the night. I found that I had to be very careful on this stretch of the TAT. There are oil and gas wells everywhere, and so there are large trucks hauling tanks and equipment barreling down the middle of the road. These guys are on a schedule, and are not too concerned about sharing the road with motorcycles. They also make the road very rough with deep trenches and deep powdery silt. I had to tiptoe through this section, but finally arrived in Alva where I met Donna for the night. It was 99 degrees when I arrived, with the winds picking up speed to over 30 MPH.
301 total miles today, 1,852 for the trip so far. 6.2 gallons of gas and 23 ounces of injector oil through the pump, which seems to be doing a better job. The original 35 year-old rear brake shoes are now shot, and I will have to replace them in the morning, but the Toad is still hopping.


Mudhole near Lake Oologah

ABee screwed with this post 06-12-2013 at 10:23 PM
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:24 PM   #55
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Day Eight Photos



Hodaka fans in Nowata, OK



The rock chute down into the creek on NS 413, near Delaware, OK
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:27 PM   #56
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Day Eight Photos



The town "too tough to die." Elgin, KS




The people in Elgin know how far they are from everywhere else.
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:32 PM   #57
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
Day Eight Photos



Tall Grass Prairie Preserve, near Foraker, OK



Big rig trenches on the TAT near Manchester, OK
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:38 PM   #58
JAB
Unsprung Weight
 
JAB's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Beautiful Monrovia
Oddometer: 1,227
You rock! Enjoy the ride.
__________________
1991 Honda XR628R
1978 Yamaha XT500
JAB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2013, 09:47 PM   #59
ABee OP
Near Normal
 
Joined: May 2013
Location: North Georgia
Oddometer: 140
BrainsB4Beauty, bymbie, mefadv,DocAxeYarYar,zenjen,skowinski,SuchesRider,t attewell, JAB- Thanks for the kind comments.

LJHrider- Cool, a fellow Georgian. Maybe we can swap stories some day.

TomW- It wasn't the steep descent as much as it was your alignment to the runway!
ABee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2013, 02:24 AM   #60
sidetrack one
Boss STAG
 
sidetrack one's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: hole shaven area
Oddometer: 4,641
Watching and loving this RR from Australia, this may be the best TAT RR ever!
Whats your average travelling time per day?. 300 miles has to equate to 8 to 10 hours surely?
__________________
I live more in 5 minutes on my motorcycle than some people live in a lifetime...............
I'm a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma....... sort of like a human turducken!
www.buyabale.com.au.. Our farmers thank you!
sidetrack one is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014