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Old 07-12-2013, 08:58 AM   #78661
dman
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Joined: Sep 2004
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Oddometer: 526
D606

Hmmm ... surprised to see criticism of the D606 recently. I now have over 2K miles on mine and they seem fine street and dirt, though I haven't ridden in rain (or mud). I finally did a "real" dual-sport ride last weekend, about 700 miles total with maybe 100 off pavement, a few of which were some pretty rocky and loose (by my noob standards) OHV trails in the Sierras, and on a few hills I needed all the traction I could get. But the 200+ miles of slab to-and-from the mountains was handled fine too. And on a few sections of twisty/bumpy paved FS roads (Frazier Creek Rd, Plumas NF - just ride it!) I didn't have much in the way of chicken strips left. BTW, this was the second longish ride I've done since installing ProCycle's lowered pegs and they definitely make a huge difference. The stock seat was really tolerable, and standing off road, though something I still don't feel totally comfortable with, was much easier.

-dman
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Old 07-12-2013, 09:37 AM   #78662
TrophyHunter
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I think the 606 may be a little noisier than some want but my set worked well on the street. I was surprised at how much traction they had in corners. I'm not a canyon carver by any stretch but went too hot into a couple of corners and had to do the "steady throttle, lean - Lean - LEAN" mantra in my head and they hung on.

Hold up well in the rocky stuff, too.
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:45 AM   #78663
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSF1200S View Post
Ok, so with this all past me, I have a crazy theory. Tell me what you think of this:

I started out using kerosene in a squirt bottle and bel ray chain lube. Having no experience on the road, I figured kerosene could be easily sourced. I was wrong. As I ran into only being able to buy large quantities of kerosene, I switched to wd40 since I had read in many places about guys using that to clean their chains. I would spray the chain with wd40, then wipe it off with a rag, then apply chain lube and let it dry. I would always do this when the chain was hot.

The problem is, as some have mentioned, wd40 is a penetrant. My theory is that the wd40 penetrated the orings and ruined the grease inside, and soon the chain started rusting internally (despite my cleaning and lubing). At the same time, the Keintech simple stand I use isnt the most stable, but certainly weighs less, costs less, and takes zero ground clearance when stowed compared to a center stand; this stand allows the bike to move a little when I would spin the wheel to blast the chain with wd40. Overspray prolly hit the spacer by the cush hub bearing a number of times, consequently pentrating the seal (or around the bearing perhaps?) and destroying the grease in the bearing. As the bearing wore, it started to place all sorts of additional force on the wheel bearings and caused the one nearest to the rotor to start going bad. **EDIT** I really am not sure the cush bearing could put additional force on the wheel bearings, but id like your opinions.

I always check the wheel for movement when I deal with the chain, but I will confess I didnt always check the sprocket for lateral movement. This happened fast because I know in fairbanks there was no wheel slop at all.

Maybe im reaching here, but the cush hub bearing definitely had a rusty runny watery crap coming out of it, and this theory seems plausible.

Anyone else want to part some wisdom on me? I feel really stupid (and I was for sure) but at least I know better now. Im using diesel in a squirt bottle to clean the chain and silicone lubricant to keep the orings conditioned. I clean when warm, and I wipe the chain off before extended dirt sessions. Sound right?

Moral of the story: dont blast wd40 on chains or by accident, bearings. I guess some might spray wd40 on a rag, but for me diesel is so cheap, abundant, convenient and good at cleaning that Im just going to use it from now on.
There have been tests run on NEW X ring chain ... soaked in WD40 for a week. WD did not get past X rings. ... BUT ... on a worn chain? Maybe you have a point? Go light on the WD40!

I don't flood my chain with WD (expensive!) and I try to wipe most of it off after cleaning. If you leave a lot on there ... then some chain lubes won't stay on the chain if it's wet with WD40. This is true for the Dupont Teflon product. So, clean off the WD best you can.
Diesel is great. My only complaint? It stinks and my rags end up stinking, but it's cheap and plentiful, does a good job. I say, go with it.

I don't believe WD over spray ruined your Hubb or wheel bearings. More likely water exposure and hard use. Rain riding, stream crossings and
off road riding will take a lot of life out of both your chain and your bearings.
I've no idea on the "order of failure" or how one would affect the other.

Don't forget to check your LINK bearings, especially the most exposed ones that are low down. Re-Grease when you can. (I do it about once a year if I've ridden in the wet)

Your DR will be in top shape by the time you make it home! Excellent maintenance reports ... and proves my point that starting off a long ride with lots of new parts and a complete fresh service, saves time/money on the road.

I learned this in the 80's doing Baja rides:
The standard rule for our 1500 mile Baja Ride (about 70% off road) was:
1. New Tires/Tubes (with 3 spare tubes on board)
2. New Chain/Sprockets (spare master link, spare CS sprocket)
3. New Battery
4. Complete service, checking/lubing all bearings
5. Loc Tite everything, check all fasteners
6. Complete Tool kit, spares, nut/bolt kit
7. First Aid kit
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:53 AM   #78664
Adv Grifter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NWBoon View Post
Wow, City Bike is a magazine name I hadn't heard in years! I went to college at Sacramento State from 1990 to 1995 and really enjoyed reading that publication. My only form of transportation from 90 - 94 was a 1988 Kawasaki EX500. I put 33,000 or so miles on that little bike and had a blast with it (first motorcycle). Thanks Adv Grifter for lots of great reading back in my wild days.
Thanks Boon, glad City Bike is remembered so fondly! We all miss Joe Glydon, John De India and Herb Chain. What's funny is we constantly got high praise from the "Glossy" mag editors ... who LOVED City Bike ... they wished they could do ... and say ... what we could.
Cheers!
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:20 AM   #78665
jeknow
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Location: Central FL
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I like Dirt Bike magazine ok I sub to it. They didn't publish the whole letter I wrote were I said guys that just ride bikes in dirt circles shouldn't write about adventure bikes. But it's all good I like riding dirt bikes too. And I stand by all bike riders. Make that responsible riders. DR riders are different anyway you have to be to ride a 350lb. Dirt bike.

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Old 07-12-2013, 11:29 AM   #78666
DockingPilot
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Location: Andover, N.J.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
I learned this in the 80's doing Baja rides:
The standard rule for our 1500 mile Baja Ride (about 70% off road) was:
1. New Tires/Tubes (with 3 spare tubes on board)
2. New Chain/Sprockets (spare master link, spare CS sprocket)
3. New Battery
4. Complete service, checking/lubing all bearings
5. Loc Tite everything, check all fasteners
6. Complete Tool kit, spares, nut/bolt kit
7. First Aid kit
I have similar requirements when we go. Before our "Forever West trip, I asked my friend "how old is your 950 battery" ?
"4 years".
I told him to change it out before we leave,
why ? he asked.
"Because I aint pushing or towing your bike across the big empty on a 25 degree morning"
He said: "why not, I'd push yours".



wise ass.
He dropped a new one in.
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:06 PM   #78667
shu
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Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Colorado
Oddometer: 902
More chain care, if you care.

I carry a small (4 oz plastic bottle) of 75/90 gear oil, a very small can of WD 40 and a 1 inch cheap paint brush. These don't take up much space, less than the size of a can of chain spray and I can make these supplies last for a month on the road, if I'm careful.

To clean the chain- spray the wd 40 on the brush and rotate the wheel (I have a centerstand). One spray on the brush for each side of the chain. Then wipe off the WD 40 with a paper towel.

To oil the chain, use the same brush, only put some gear oil on it. Same routine, hold the brush against the chain and spin the wheel. Again, wipe off excess oil with the same paper towel.

When I'm traveling I do this everyday, usually in the morning but almost never when I should do it: at the end of the day when the chain is hot.

When the day's riding is done, it's beer time and I forget all about the chain.



Priorities.

...........shu
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:17 PM   #78668
shu
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Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Colorado
Oddometer: 902
Quote:
Originally Posted by DockingPilot View Post
I have similar requirements when we go. Before our "Forever West trip, I asked my friend "how old is your 950 battery" ?
"4 years".
I told him to change it out before we leave,
why ? he asked.
"Because I aint pushing or towing your bike across the big empty on a 25 degree morning"
.
I replace my battery every 3 years now, even if it seems fine.

It works out to about $30 /year for the feeling of confidence you get when, after parking to take a piss 40 miles back in the woods, you return to the bike and put your thumb on the starter button. It's worth it : no more 'come on baby, start for me prayers', no special starter tricks, just push the button and go.

..........shu
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:46 PM   #78669
DockingPilot
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Location: Andover, N.J.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shu View Post
I replace my battery every 3 years now, even if it seems fine.

It works out to about $30 /year for the feeling of confidence you get when, after parking to take a piss 40 miles back in the woods, you return to the bike and put your thumb on the starter button. It's worth it : no more 'come on baby, start for me prayers', no special starter tricks, just push the button and go.

..........shu
My thoughts exactly.
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:16 PM   #78670
Foot dragger
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Joined: Dec 2006
Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrophyHunter View Post
I think the 606 may be a little noisier than some want but my set worked well on the street. I was surprised at how much traction they had in corners. I'm not a canyon carver by any stretch but went too hot into a couple of corners and had to do the "steady throttle, lean - Lean - LEAN" mantra in my head and they hung on.

Hold up well in the rocky stuff, too.
Ive burned through 3 or 4 rear 606's,they work pretty well in dirt and slide predictably for me,not too vibey on the street. I think they're about worn out,they get down to about 1/3 of a tire and then they seem to hang that way for a long time,that's when I get the mileage out of them. Maybe 2000 if I really run em down to nubs.
Never had any sliding on the street with em.
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:53 PM   #78671
Adv Grifter
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Location: Passing ADV Stalkers in California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeknow View Post
I like Dirt Bike magazine ok I sub to it. They didn't publish the whole letter I wrote were I said guys that just ride bikes in dirt circles shouldn't write about adventure bikes. But it's all good I like riding dirt bikes too. And I stand by all bike riders. Make that responsible riders. DR riders are different anyway you have to be to ride a 350lb. Dirt bike.
I like responsible dirt bike riders too (I am one! ) A lot of us started off riding Moto Cross or Cow Trailing ... 40 years later ... here we are!

I started riding AMA Enduro at 39, competed 7 years. It's discouraging to see guys abuse the land and ignore the rules ... I don't like a lot of the rules either ... but try to follow best I can. We're losing the battle and most riders I see could care less.

I still have a trail bike (Yam WR250F) but for overall travel fun, prefer my DR650. (yes, I have trouble picking it up when it's loaded with gear!)
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Old 07-12-2013, 06:18 PM   #78672
Thumper Dan
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Joined: Dec 2011
Location: Australia, Northern NSW
Oddometer: 285
chain lube

I've been looking at Belray chain lube. Not sure if anyone has used it yet but may give it ago.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Belray-Su...51d274b&_uhb=1
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:10 PM   #78673
barko1
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Location: Las Cruces, NM or thereabouts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dankatz View Post
Don't make the mistake I did...I bought 6 of these. This is NOT for chains. They have a chain specific one now which is yellow. Read on webbikeworld.com - they changed the formulation which is why they also don't have a picture of the chain. The color of the can is the same! Very confusing....

I agree - they are the best lubricants. I bought a 6 pack of the yellow one
http://www.walmart.com/ip/DuPont-Tef...11-oz/16672659
Motorcycle Consumer News just did a product evaluation of these two and they thought the original blue formulation was great stuff but the the new yellow was crappy at best and urged people to use the old.
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:21 PM   #78674
dman
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Joined: Sep 2004
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Oddometer: 526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter View Post
It's discouraging to see guys abuse the land and ignore the rules ... I don't like a lot of the rules either ... but try to follow best I can. We're losing the battle and most riders I see could care less.
We're probably getting off topic here, but first, I love City Bike ... I think Joe Glydon was one of the best moto-scribes of them all. Second, my experience is that most riders do not care. I often hear the cliche that a few are ruining it for the majority, whether it's dirt bikes, 4wd or mountain bikes, but my experience has usually been that a majority is ruining it for the few who truly want to co-exist with hikers, farmers and ranchers, wildlife, and clean air and nature. At least in California ... yeah we have a lot of rules, but we have a lot of people, and a lot of land.

-dman
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:47 PM   #78675
eakins
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Joined: May 2002
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shu View Post
I replace my battery every 3 years now, even if it seems fine.

It works out to about $30 /year for the feeling of confidence you get when, after parking to take a piss 40 miles back in the woods, you return to the bike and put your thumb on the starter button. It's worth it : no more 'come on baby, start for me prayers', no special starter tricks, just push the button and go.

..........shu
Deka AGMS are $70 shipped and will last a 4 solid years with little or no maintenance. these are solid made in the US AGM batteries. that works out to less than $18 a year for reliable starting.
http://www.etx9.com/
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