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Old 08-13-2013, 12:35 PM   #1381
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Flemington - Taylor County (was missing marker)

(Don't miss the newly-refurbished markers on the previous page)

Flemington - Taylor County.


This marker was missing for several years and was replaced in 2013. It is located at the junction of Rt 76 and CR 13, next to the B&O Railroad Bridge. The town of Flemington has a population of about 312 (as of 2010) and is a quiet town located about 10 miles east/southeast of Clarksburg and Bridgeport. It was the site of West Virginia College, opened in 1865 by Free Will Baptists in the area and functioned until the 1890s.

Interesting bit of history about Thomas Allen on the marker.




Historical Marker - (Side #1 facing SE) - Located at the junction of Rt 76 and CR 13.

GPS Coordinates:

39* 15' 59.11" N
80* 07' 54.94" W



Historical Marker (Side #2 facing NW)




View SE past B&O Railroad bridge towards the Post Office and Emergency Services Building. Rt 76 continues under bridge towards Philippi.



View NW. Rt 76 continues to the left towards Clarksburg, and CR 13 starts to the right towards Grafton. Straight ahead is local road.



Yes, trains still use this bridge and tracks daily.




View of the Veterans' Memorial in front of the Emergency Services Building. The marker is to the left and just on the other side of the underpass on the right.




There is a very nice Veterans' Memorial here. Especially impressive for such a small town.




Nice to see a town that isn't ashamed to have God's name on a public memorial. Thanks to these men and women who served our country - many giving the ultimate sacrifice for our freedoms.



Nice plaque at the memorial.


Flemington is a neat place to visit - lots of good riding in on Rt 76 or CR 13.
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Old 08-18-2013, 04:48 PM   #1382
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Preston County / Maryland State Line on Rt 7

This previously missing marker was replaced in 2013.


EDIT: The original marker was found last year in front of the tourism office in Arthurdale. See Post # 1351 on Page 91.




Historical Marker located on Rt 7 at the Preston County / Maryland state line, appx 3 miles east of Terra Alta.

GPS:
39* 25' 09.92" N
79* 29' 03.52" W






Same marker - Side #2




View of Side #2 - Eastbound entering Maryland on Rt 7





View of Side #1 - Westbound entering West Virginia on Rt 7



Another view westbound entering WV on Rt 7.

Hopemont Hospital is appx 2 miles ahead, and Terra Alta is another mile past that.



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Old 08-18-2013, 05:07 PM   #1383
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REFURBISHED MARKER - Terra Alta / Preston County

Refurbished Marker - Terra Alta - Preston County

This marker was photographed earlier and has since been refurbished. It has also been moved about 1/4 mile east of its previous location.




BEFORE: Old photo from 2010. See previous post # 405 on Page 27.


*******



AFTER: Refurbished marker (Side #1) Now located just east of the intersection of Rt 7 (East State Ave) and South Main Street (Aurora Pike)

GPS:
39* 26' 43.68" N
79* 32' 45.85"W





Refurbished Marker - Side #2




View westbound on Rt entering Terra Alta. The old marker was located ahead just across the street from the red church (last bldg on the left).



View eastbound on Rt 7 leaving Terra Alta.



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Old 08-19-2013, 12:00 PM   #1384
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Got to looking and this marker is listed as missing in the spread sheet...
Berkeley WV Berkeley Co / Virginia Rt 11

Missing

I thought Vatrader01 had them all in Berk. Co.

I go by this sign 5-10 times a week - think i may stop and clear the brush and trees from it...

"The Mountain State"--western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763. Named for Queen Elizabeth, the Virgin Queen of England. Site of the first permanent English settlement in America, 1607. One of the 13 original colonies. The Old Dominion is the birthplace of eight United States Presidents.

A lot of history up and down the Martinsburg/Winchester Pike. There are quiet a few unincorporated communities between Martinsburg and Winchester.

Shenandoah valley pioneers and their descendants published the following in 1908:

Another important Turnpike in the Valley is "The Martinsburg and Winchester Turnpike." A charter was granted this company March 24, 1838, "with all the rights, powers and privileges, and subject to all the restrictions and liabilities herein given to and imposed upon the Valley Turnpike Company," the state giving same aid as granted the Valley Turnpike Company. This road is too well known to need any description; it being a continuation of the Valley system. It is managed and controlled by its own President and Directors. The route is through one of the most highly cultivated sections of the Valley—gorgeous scenery to the right and left;—and the great Valley lying to the south gives the traveler full satisfaction in his effort to study the landscapes so well known to thousands, who once in the line of duty marched over this Pike; when the armies of the North and South frequently used this highway. It has been estimated that more than a million soldiers marched over this road within the space of three years—with attendant artillery and army trains; that fully one hundred thousand horses, wagons, etc., also traveled it. The close of the war found it in bad condition. The company, however, rallied to their work, and had the Pike pass through its reconstruction period


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Old 08-19-2013, 01:23 PM   #1385
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Missing marker found

Quote:
Originally Posted by RebRider View Post
Got to looking and this marker is listed as missing in the spread sheet...
Berkeley WV Berkeley Co / Virginia Rt 11

Missing

I thought Vatrader01 had them all in Berk. Co.

I go by this sign 5-10 times a week - think i may stop and clear the brush and trees from it...

"The Mountain State"--western part of the Commonwealth of Virginia until June 20, 1863. Settled by the Germans and Scotch-Irish. It became a line of defense between the English and French during the French and Indian War, 1754-1763. Named for Queen Elizabeth, the Virgin Queen of England. Site of the first permanent English settlement in America, 1607. One of the 13 original colonies. The Old Dominion is the birthplace of eight United States Presidents.

A lot of history up and down the Martinsburg/Winchester Pike. There are quiet a few unincorporated communities between Martinsburg and Winchester.

Shenandoah valley pioneers and their descendants published the following in 1908:

Another important Turnpike in the Valley is "The Martinsburg and Winchester Turnpike." A charter was granted this company March 24, 1838, "with all the rights, powers and privileges, and subject to all the restrictions and liabilities herein given to and imposed upon the Valley Turnpike Company," the state giving same aid as granted the Valley Turnpike Company. This road is too well known to need any description; it being a continuation of the Valley system. It is managed and controlled by its own President and Directors. The route is through one of the most highly cultivated sections of the Valley—gorgeous scenery to the right and left;—and the great Valley lying to the south gives the traveler full satisfaction in his effort to study the landscapes so well known to thousands, who once in the line of duty marched over this Pike; when the armies of the North and South frequently used this highway. It has been estimated that more than a million soldiers marched over this road within the space of three years—with attendant artillery and army trains; that fully one hundred thousand horses, wagons, etc., also traveled it. The close of the war found it in bad condition. The company, however, rallied to their work, and had the Pike pass through its reconstruction period

RebRider - Great find! This one was listed as missing. I will update the spreadsheet ASAP (hopefully in the next day or two) and update the link on Post #1.

I would be surprised if VaTrader missed it if it was actually in place when he was looking for these. He was a pretty thorough guy. Has anyone heard from him? He just up and disappeared about 2 years ago and has not been on ADV or the KLR forums since. Super nice guy, very interesting to talk with, and would give you the shirt off his back.

Thanks for posting these!!
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Old 08-19-2013, 01:57 PM   #1386
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Dunkard Bottom - Preston County

This marker was previously missing - replaced in 2013


I tried to research the namesake and came up dry, except for a similar location in Pulaski County, VA named "Dunkard's Bottom" with the following footnote on HMdb.org - The name Dunkard’s Bottom derived from earlier settlement of Dunkers, a German religious sect. Dunkers settled in several regions of southwestern Virginia during the eighteenth century.

I don't know if this has any relationship to WV's Dunkard Bottom. I'll ask the expert - Joe Geiger in Charleston and get back with a followup.



EDIT: I received the following email back from Joe Geiger, Director of the WV History & Archives Department ----

Hey Mike: Great work! Yes, I believe that’s where the name originated. This is from “West Virginia Place Names”:
Dunkard Creek
A br. of the Monongahela R., Clay D., Monongalia Co.
This stream was named for Dr. Thomas Ecka€rly and his two brothers, Dunkard, who settled at its mouth in 1758. Later, at Dunkard Bottom on the Cheat R., the second and third brothers were massacred.

The spelling of the brothers’ surname varies somewhat. Wither[s] (p. 75) and DeHass (HES, p. 74) spell it Eckarly; Hale (p. 235) spells it Eckerly; and Morton (Monroe, p. 27) spells it Eckerlin.

Thornton (An American Glossary, I, 276) defines Dunkard, Dunker, as “A species of Anabaptist, originating in Germany; found mostly in Pennsylvania.”





Located on Rt 7 appx 2 miles east of the junction of Rt 7 and Rt 26 in Kingwood, just east of the Camp Dawson turnoff.

GPS Location:
39* 27' 36.97" N
79* 38' 58.35" W




Same marker - Side #2




View westbound on Rt 7 - turnoff for Camp Dawson is to the right. Kingwood is straight ahead about 2 miles.




View eastbound on Rt 7. Terra Alta is about 10 miles east.





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Old 08-20-2013, 02:23 AM   #1387
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Albright/Albright Family - Preston County

This marker was previously missing - replaced in 2013.

Population: 299 (The median age in the town was 38.2 years. 22.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 12.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.1% were from 25 to 44; 28.4% were from 45 to 64; and 13% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 47.5% male and 52.5% female. The racial makeup of the town was 97.3% White, 0.3% African American, 1.0%Native American, and 1.3% from two or more races.)




Historical marker located on Rt 26 appx 100 meters north/east of the Cheat River Bridge in the town of Albright.

GPS:
39* 20' 40.87" N
79* 38' 38.60" W
Elevation 1,207'






Same marker - Side #2




View north/east bound on Rt 26.




View south/west bound on Rt 26. Cheat River Bridge is in background.




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Old 08-20-2013, 02:54 AM   #1388
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Old Iron Furnace - Preston County

This marker was previously missing - Replaced in 2013

(From Wikipedia):
Virginia Furnace, also known as Muddy Creek Furnace and Josephine Furnace, is a historic water powered blast furnace and national historic district located near Albright, WV. The district encompasses three contributing structures and one contributing site. The furnace was built in 1854, and was a "charcoal" iron furnace used to smelt iron. It is constructed of cut sandstone, and forms a truncated pyramid measuring approximately 34 feet square in plan and rising about 30 feet. The district includes the nearby wheel pit, blast machinery, and salamander. The furnace remained in operation until the 1890s, and was the last "charcoal" iron furnace to cease operating in northern West Virginia. In 1933, the Virginia Furnace was acquired by the Kingswood Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution who created a roadside park at the furnace site.


(From Waymarking.com):
Iron was almost as essential to pioneer life as was salt, the first mineral resource exploited, and was needed for a variety of agricultural and household purposes. The iron industry, therefore, developed at an early stage in West Virginia's history. Small, workable iron veins were discovered in many areas in the State, and small furnaces were set up at these spots for smelting the ore and manufacturing bar iron for the pioneer blacksmiths. In West Virginia, iron production began in 1760 at "The Bloomery," near Harpers Ferry, on the lower Shenandoah River. George Washington considered the iron produced here so superior that in 1794 he established the federal arsenal and gun factory at Harpers Ferry. At first, iron and iron products were carried west over the mountains to the pioneers. But because the journey was difficult, iron furnaces were soon established farther west. In 1794, Peter Tarr built one of the first iron furnaces west of the Alleghenies on Kings Creek near Weirton, in Hancock County. As well as making cooking utensils and iron grates, this furnace also cast the cannonballs used by Commodore Oliver H. Perry in the 1813 Battle of Lake Erie. Most of the iron furnaces were built in the Cheat River Valley near Ices Ferry and along Deckers Creek in the Monongahela River Valley. The Decker's Creek Iron Works, also called Rock Forge, produced bar iron as early as 1798, although the most extensive iron works were on the Cheat River. At Pleasant Furnace, built on Quarry Run about 1798, Samuel Jackson produced large quantities of bar iron and sold it in exchange for cash, grain, and country products. Since the Pleasant (Davis) Furnace was small, it did not supply enough iron for Jackson's use. So new furnaces were built, such as Woodgrove, Henry Clay, and Anna, all near Ices Ferry on the Cheat River. Since iron manufacturers preferred charcoal over coal for the furnaces, the lumber industry in the area was encouraged and thrived. During its peak years, in the 1840s, the Jackson Iron Works was a well-known establishment, employing as many as 1,200 workers. A thriving community developed with over 100 homes, four times the size of nearby Morgantown. (Complements WVGES) Short of a few foundations, there is almost no evidence of this community today. The Josephine Furnace was built on Muddy Creek somewhere between 1847 and 1852 by Harrison Hagans and called Virginia Furnace. It was operated by George Maust, then by Lloyd and later by Landon Maust. In 1879 it was run by B. Patterson under the name of Josephine Furnace and work ceased in 1880. (West Virginia Geological Survey, Preston County Report, 1914)









Historical Marker located on Rt 26 appx 3 miles north of Albright.


GPS:
39* 31' 46.86" N
79* 37' 57.98" W
Elevation: 1,363 Ft






Same marker - Side #2







View northbound on Rt 26. Furnace is down hill to the left. Top of furnace is visible between motorcycle and white sign.








View southbound on Rt 26. Albright is appx 3 miles ahead.




Starting down steps/walkway to furnace.






Close-up of sign.







Down the steps to the furnace.







Plaque beside the furnace.








Close-up of plaque.







Close-up of plaque. This gives you an idea of what the entire structure looked like.









Close-up of plaque.







View of furnace from the west side looking east.








Muddy Creek runs beside the furnace.










Another view of the furnace from the NW corner.






View as you look in the side opening.









I climbed inside (no snakes today) and took this photo looking up the chimney.





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Old 08-20-2013, 03:20 AM   #1389
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Update

UPDATE: Joe Geiger sent me some locations on some of the New/Refurbished markers. I have also deleted the few that I documented the past week.


In the meantime, here is what I have TENTATIVELY - meaning, the markers were ordered and presumed to be delivered to the local DOH sign shops, but we don't know if they are in place. I stopped by our local shop, and the sign man (Rick Reed) told me he had put up a few, but he still had some in the wrappers waiting to be installed. So.... with that in mind, here is a list of new or refurbished markers that MAY or MAY NOT be in place yet. The new markers did not have an exact location listed (which are on the list of questions for Joe).

NEW MARKERS:

Capon Lake Whipple Truss Bridge (Hampshire Co) Location ?

Stalnaker Cabin Site and Cemetery (Randolph Co) US 250, south of Beverly, near junction with Scott Lake Road

Oakwood Mine Complex (Fayette Co) WV 612, .65 miles west of Carlisle


Carswell Mining Complex (McDowell Co) WV 52, near Carswell Hollow Road

Lavina Norman (Cabell Co) 1500 block of 10th Avenue, Huntington

Jimtown/Phillips Cemetery (Randolph Co) - WV151, near intersection with Jimtown Road


WERE PREVIOUSLY LISTED AS MISSING:

Camp Carlile (Ohio CO) Zane St / N. Wabash St - Wheeling Island, Wheeling
Greenbrier CO / Virginia - Rt 60 (?)
Asa Gray / Buffalo Trail (Randolph Co) - Rt 250 near Pocahontas Co line
Fort Ogden (Grant Co) Rt 50 - E of Gormania - 1 mile west of CR 50-2
Fairfax Line (Grant Co) Rt 220 - 1 mile south of Petersburg
Dunmore's Camp (Wood Co) - Rt 2 - Waverly
Huntington (Cabell Co) - Rt 60 (5th Ave) between 7th and 8th Street
Lover's Leap (Morgan Co) - Rt 522 - north of Berkeley Springs (better get this one before someone steals it again!)
Mason-Dixon Line (Preston Co) - Rt 26 NE of Bruceton Mills at the PA state line. (** Note: still missing as of Aug 10, 2014)
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Old 09-07-2013, 04:39 PM   #1390
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UNLISTED MARKER: Elizabeth Simpson Drewry - McDowell County

This marker is not listed in the "Marking Our Past" book. The book was last updated in 2002 and the marker wasn't made until 2006.


Elizabeth Simpson Drewry - Marker located on Rt 52 in Northfork (McDowell County) appx 12 miles east of Welch.


In 1950, Elizabeth Simpson Drewry became the first African- American woman elected to the West Virginia Legislature. She was born in Motley, Virginia, on September 22, 1893. She moved to McDowell County, West Virginia, as a small child and had a daughter at the age of fourteen. Her husband was Bluefield professor William H. Drewry, who died in Chicago in 1951.

Elizabeth Drewry began teaching in the black schools of coal camps along Elkhorn Creek in 1910, and later taught in the McDowell County black public school system. Drewry received her education at Bluefield Colored Institute, Wilberforce University, and the University of Cincinnati, and received a degree from Bluefield State College in 1933.


She first entered politics as a Republican precinct poll worker in 1921. In 1936, Drewry switched her party affiliation to Democrat and became involved in the state Federation of Teachers. She took an interest in local organizations such as the American Red Cross and the McDowell County Public Library. Drewry served on the Northfork Town Council and rose to the position of associate chairperson of the powerful McDowell County Democratic Executive Committee.


In 1948, she ran for the House of Delegates for the first time, but was defeated in the primary election by Harry Pauley of Iaeger. Five Democrats and five Republicans from McDowell County were elected in the primary to run in the general election. Since McDowell County was overwhelmingly Democratic, it virtually assured the five Democratic nominees of winning. Drewry was announced as the winner of the fifth spot on the Democratic ticket in the initial vote count, but Pauley protested the result. In a recount, 64 disputed ballots were all given to Pauley and he defeated Drewry by 32 votes.


In 1950, Drewry ran again and won the fifth spot on the Democratic ticket. In the general election, she received nearly 18,000 votes, becoming the first African-American woman elected to the legislature. In 1927, Minnie Buckingham Harper was appointed to succeed her late husband in the West Virginia Legislature, becoming the first black woman in the nation to serve in a state legislature. However, Harper was never elected.


During her thirteen years in the legislature, Drewry was a leading advocate for education and labor. She chaired both the Military Affairs and Health committees and served on the Judiciary, Education, Labor and Industry, Counties, Districts and Municipalities, Humane Institutions, and Mining committees. She introduced legislation in 1955 allowing women to serve on juries. West Virginia was the last state to eliminate this form of discrimination. In 1956, Ebony magazine honored Drewry as one of the ten outstanding black women in government.



She retired due to poor health in 1964, having served longer in the legislature than any other McDowell Countian. Drewry died in Welch on September 24, 1979, at the age of eighty-five.


(From WV Dept of History and Archives website: http://www.wvculture.org/History/drewry.html )





Historical Marker located on Rt 52 in Northfork, appx 12 miles east of Welch.


GPS:
37* 24' 58.04" N
87* 26' 10.84" W







Historical Marker - Side #2








View of marker eastbound on Rt 52.








View of marker westbound on Rt 52. Town of Northfork.





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Old 10-15-2013, 04:11 PM   #1391
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NEW MARKER - Capon Lake Bridge - Hampshire Co

Finally found time to post this from a ride 2 weeks ago:

New Marker located at the Capon Lake Bridge - Rt 259 in Hampshire County. There was (and still is) a marker at this location for Capon Springs.

Lat: 39.158873* Long: -78.534949*



Historical marker is located on the west end of the bridge - Rt 259, appx 100 yards north of CR 16 near Capon Lake, appx 8 miles north of Wardensville.




Same marker - Side #2





View of bridge and marker. The old marker for Capon Springs is to the right (shown below as last photo).



View across walkway of bridge.




View from east end of bridge looking back towards the marker.




View northbound on Rt 259. Bridge is to the right.




View of bridge from CR 16. Cacapon River.



Original marker at this location is for Capon Springs.



Statement of Significance
Written by Nathan Holth (HistoricBridges.org)


The following text is an excerpt from comments I submitted to the National Park Service regarding the nomination which proposes to list this bridge in the National Register of Historic Places.


The South Branch Bridge is an extremely old and rare example of a pin-connected Whipple (Double-Intersection Pratt) through truss that also has several unusual and distinctive construction details. The bridge’s trusses are listed as being originally built in 1874, and I found a source that suggested the bridge may have been moved to its current location in 1938. The potential relocation of this bridge, particularly so many decades ago, in my opinion does not disqualify the bridge for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Pin-connected truss bridges were noted for the ease in which they could be disassembled and relocated, a unique trait not shared by most other bridge types. It was common many decades ago, when they became insufficient for their original location, to relocate and reuse pin-connected truss bridges at other locations where the bridge could still be useful. This is part of their history.



Nationwide, only a very small number of metal truss bridges date to before 1880. The South Branch Bridge’s 1874 construction date thus places it among the oldest surviving metal truss bridges in the county. In addition, bridges built before 1880 were built in a period of experimentation and development of the metal truss bridge in the United States that tapered off by the early 1880s as builders gravitated toward more reliable standardized designs. During this period of experimentation, different builders experimented with a variety of creative and unusual designs, form the overall truss design down to specific construction details. The South Branch Bridge displays some of these unusual construction details. The composition of the built-up top chord and end post follows an unusual design. The use of “threaded rod with nut” connections on the top chord are also non-standard truss details. At the same time, the bridge displays some of the details that would continue to be seen in the more standardized trusses of the 1880s. These details include the use of traditional pin connections on the bottom chord, as well as the overall Whipple truss configuration.



As a result, the South Branch Bridge is historically and technologically significant because it documents the period of transition from experimentation to standardization of metal truss bridge construction in the United States. In addition, the bridge’s Whipple truss configuration, generally reserved for spans in excess of 140 feet, (the Single Intersection Pratt truss was usually used for shorter spans) is today a rare truss configuration both nationwide and in West Virginia.






***


THE FOLLOWING IS THE DETAILED APPLICATION FOR THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES:


Capon Lake Whipple Truss Bridge is located along WV Route 259 in Hampshire County, immediately north of the intersection with Hampshire County Route 16. It crosses the Cacapon River and is just downstream of the Capon Lake Bridge, a steel stringer structure built in 1991 to replace the Whipple Truss for vehicular traffic. The surrounding landscape is rural and forested. Capon Springs, an historic spring and resort first discovered in the late 1700s and still in operation as a retreat, is about 3.5 miles east of Capon Lake on County Route 16.

The structure is a Whipple/Murphy Truss bridge, approximately 20’ wide and 176’ long, built atop a reinforced concrete abutment and pier. The bridge has a full-length pedestrian walkway, with an observation platform and seating near midspan. The truss consists of 14 bays, each approximately 11’ wide and 23’ tall. The truss has a double-intersection configuration, meaning that the diagonals extend across two bays. The bridge is constructed of wrought iron and is pin-connected. The Capon Lake Whipple Truss Bridge was constructed in 1874 near Romney as part of a larger two-span Whipple Truss bridge. The current bridge span was moved to its current location in 1938 and connected to a Pratt truss. The Pratt truss was removed in 1991. At this time, the decking was removed from the Whipple truss and a pedestrian walkway and viewing platform was constructed.

STATEMENT of SIGNIFICANCE
Capon Lake Whipple Truss is eligible on a state level under Criterion C for its engineering significance as an excellent example of a Whipple/Murphy Truss bridge and under Criterion Consideration B: Moved Properties. Its period of significance is its date of construction, 1874. Due to its uncommon innovative design and age, Capon Lake Whipple Truss is one of West Virginia’s most significant bridges and it is maintained as a historical site for pedestrians by West Virginia Division of Highways District 5. This is an early example of the use of metal truss bridge technology, which characterized highway bridge design well into the twentieth century. Trusses such as this could be ordered from catalogs by county courts and other entities and could be built faster and more economically than stone bridges, and could span longer distances
with more durability than wooden bridges. Capon Lake Whipple Truss is the state’s oldest example of a bridge technology that revolutionized road transportation throughout the state.
The bridge was originally built near Romney, West Virginia in 1874 on US Route 50, which follows the route of the Northwestern Turnpike. The bridge exhibits the characteristic innovations developed by prominent bridge designers Squire Whipple and J.W. Murphy, including double-intersection diagonals and counter-diagonals, and pin connections. Metal truss bridges were marketed as moveable structures that could be dismantled and re-erected elsewhere if necessary; this bridge was moved from its original location to the Cacapon River in 1938 and was closed to vehicular traffic in 1991.

HISTORY
The Capon Lake Whipple Truss Bridge was constructed over the South Branch of the Potomac River one mile west of Romney, West Virginia in 1874. It replaced an 1838 covered bridge that was chartered by the Virginia General Assembly for the Northwestern Turnpike and was burned by Confederate forces during the Civil War. The town of Romney is famous for having eportedly changed hands 56 times during the Civil War; whatever the true number, Romney, especially the crossing at the South Branch of the Potomac, was certainly a strategic point due to its location on the Northwestern Turnpike, a major east-west route. After the end of the war, local citizens and the newspaper advocated for the quick replacement of the bridge, citing “continual risk, danger and inconveniences arising from want of the South Branch Bridge at Col. Gibson’s (destroyed during the war)…” The County issued bonds for a new bridge in 1868, and by 1874 the bridge
was under construction.

The South Branch Intelligencer provided frequent updates on the progress of the bridge, noting that the bridge was on track for completion by July 1875, Mr. John Ridenour lost a finger while working on the bridge but was healing well, and finally, that the bridge was completed early in October 1874. An article in the October 2, 1874 edition of the Intelligencer described the new bridge as a “complete, handsome and durable structure,” and continued, “The contractors, Messrs. White & Sons, New Brighton, Pennsylvania ‘Penn Bridge & Machine Works,’ have given us, in general opinion, a first rate, durable work, and deserve our best commendations… We are confident that ours will realize a very handsome income an fully vindicate the wisdom of the County Court in voting its construction.” When constructed outside of Romney, the original bridge was two spans, both Whipple trusses. Squire Whipple invented the Whipple truss in 1847 and was one of the first designers to use scientific analysis for structural design. His book, A Work on Bridge Building, had a vast impact on bridge engineering. Whipple’s design incorporated double-intersection diagonals into the standard Pratt truss, meaning that the diagonals extend across two truss bays. He received a patent for this design in 1847. J.W. Murphy modified the Whipple design in 1863 by adding double-intersection counter-diagonals, which allowed even longer spans. Murphy was also the first to use pinned eye-bar connections in a Whipple truss in 1859, which eliminated the need for riveted connections and allowed easier and more widespread construction. These technological advances, as well as advances in steel and iron fabrication, made wrought iron trusses a major industry in the United States. Trusses for almost any span length or site could be ordered from a company’s catalog, and shipped to the construction site. The Capon Lake Truss exhibits the later modifications of Murphy and thus is
considered a Whipple/Murphy Truss.

The structure was constructed by T.B. White and Sons of New Brighton, Pennsylvania. Timothy White began working as a carpenter beginning in the 1840s and established his iron bridge construction company in 1868, which was known as both “T.B. White and Sons” and “Penn Bridge and Machine Works.” The company’s original factory burned in 1878 and the company was moved across the Beaver River to Beaver Falls and reorganized as the Penn Bridge Company. In addition to iron bridges, the company produced a variety of structural and architectural products. It continued to grow and expand into the 20th century, and employed over 500 workers in 1908. Unlike a great number of small 19th-century bridge companies, Penn
Bridge Company was not purchased by the conglomerate American Bridge Company of U.S. Steel and continued to operate independently. Penn Bridge Company was most active in the Pittsburgh area, but built structures in almost all 50 states.

The Whipple Truss Bridge served Romney for almost 65 years. In 1935, the West Virginia State Road Commission began a project to replace the Whipple truss over the South Branch of the Potomac River. The construction was underway in 1936 when on November 18, a car hit the south side of the eastern end of the old truss span and knocked it completely off the abutment. The car fell into the riverbed below and the truss collapsed on top of it. A car coming from the west did not realize the span had fallen and then drove off the end of the west span at the pier onto the collapsed span. Miraculously, no one was seriously injured. The Hampshire Review noted that the only injury was a broken leg and that it was a wooden broken leg. A temporary wooden span was constructed in place of the collapsed span to carry traffic until the replacement bridge was opened on June 21, 1937. The remaining western span of the old Whipple truss bridge was still considered useable and was moved to Capon Lake in eastern Hampshire County to provide access across the Cacapon River to Capon Springs. A new pier and abutments were constructed to carry the Whipple truss and a Pratt truss also salvaged from another unknown bridge. The new bridge was dedicated on August 20, 1938 with a celebration including food and music from the Romney High School Band and Capon Springs Band. The ceremony was attended by several state officials, including former Governor H. G. Kump and Cy Hammill, Secretary of the State Road Commission. In a 1991 interview conducted with Branson Himelwright, a local of Capon Springs who worked on the re-erection of the Whipple truss, Mr. Himelwright stated that prior to the bridge, the two ways to cross the river to reach Capon Springs included a swinging footbridge and a ford. Mr. Himelwright and Jacob “Moss” Rudolph recalled in interviews that the excavation and concrete work for the Capon Lake truss was done by hand. The recycled trusses served Capon Lake until 1991, when they were replaced with a new structure just upstream of the Whipple truss. The Pratt span was removed due to significant deterioration, but the Whipple truss was preserved in place due to its rarity, age and engineering significance. The decking was removed and a pedestrian walkway and viewing platform was constructed.

Integrity and Criterion Consideration B: Moved Properties
Although the bridge has been moved and altered, it retains its essential characteristics. The design, materials and workmanship of the original structure remain intact. The double-intersection diagonal members, connections and truss members are original materials and were reassembled at the relocation site as per the original truss design. Wrought iron and steel bridges were marketed as moveable structures, so the bridge’s relocation to another site does not diminish its integrity. The bridge has been at its current location since 1938, a period of 73 years. It is located over a river in a rural area, as it was in its original location, maintaining the association with its original purpose or carrying travelers over a waterway. Its design
significance is not specifically related to its location, but rather to the configuration and materials of the truss. The removal of the second span, a deteriorated Pratt truss from a different unknown location, does not affect the existing span’s design or significance. Although this Whipple span was originally part of a two-span bridge, the second span was destroyed in an accident in 1938, making it impossible for the entire structure to be relocated. Finally, wooden decking on truss bridges was historically frequently replaced. The removal of the decking and construction of the pedestrian walkway are reversible alterations that are low-scale and distinguishable from the historic materials. These alterations do not detract from the Whipple truss configuration.

SUMMARY
The Capon Lake Whipple Truss is West Virginia’s oldest existing metal truss and one of the few Whipple Trusses remaining in the state. Squire Whipple, who patented this truss design in 1847, and J.W. Murphy, who designed innovative modifications seen in the Capon Lake Truss, were prolific structural engineers who contributed to the widespread use of metal trusses in the United States. As an early wrought iron example of the work of these men, Capon Lake Whipple Truss qualifies for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion C.


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Old 10-15-2013, 05:07 PM   #1392
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Grant / Hardy County Line - Rt 220

Located on Rt 220 about 3 or 4 miles east of Petersburg on the way to Moorefield.

Lat: 39.002435* Long: -79.082315*

The old marker was broken off at the base. For several years, just a small fragment of the original sign was attached to the mounting pole.



Historical Marker - Side #1



Historical Marker - Side #2




View westbound on Rt 220 towards Petersburg.




View eastbound on Rt 220 towards Moorefield.
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Old 10-19-2013, 04:35 AM   #1393
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Asa Gray / Buffalo Indian Trail - Randolph Co

Asa Gray / Buffalo Indian Trail - Randolph County

(From Wikipedia) Asa Gray (November 18, 1810 – January 30, 1888) is considered the most important American botanist of the 19th century.
He was instrumental in unifying the taxonomic knowledge of the plants of North America. Of Gray's many works on botany, the most popular was his Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States, from New England to Wisconsin and South to Ohio and Pennsylvania Inclusive. This book, known simply as Gray's Manual, has gone through a number of editions with botanical illustrations by Isaac Sprague and remains a standard in the field.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asa_Gray


(From Wikipedia) The Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike was built in the U.S. state of the Commonwealth of Virginia during the second quarter of the 19th century to provide a roadway from Staunton and the upper Shenandoah Valley to the Ohio River at present-day Parkersburg. Engineered by Claudius Crozet through the mountainous terrain, it was a toll road partially funded by the Virginia Board of Public Works. Control of this road became crucial during the American Civil War. Today, the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike can be travelled following Route 47 east from Parkersburg to Linn, then Route 33 east through Weston and Buckhannon to Elkins, then Route 250 south through Beverly and Huttonsville, crossing the West Virginia/Virginia state line to Stauton, Virginia.

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staunto...sburg_Turnpike






Historical Marker - Side #1.

Located on Rt 250 just west of Cheat Bridge, appx 10-12 miles east of Huttonsville. Appx 100 meters east of junction with CR 250/4.

GPS: LAT 38.612526 LON -79.867370 Elevation 3614





Historical Marker - Side #2





View westbound on Rt 250. Marker for Cheat Summit Camp is visible appx 50 meters past the Asa Gray marker.




View eastbound on Rt 250.


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Old 10-19-2013, 09:36 AM   #1394
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Jimtown / Phillips Cemetery - Randolph County

From Wikipedia:

Jimtown is located in Roaring Creek District of Randolph County on present day Country Route 151, (formerly U.S. Route 33), about seven miles west of Elkins, West Virginia. Jimtown was formerly known as Fair Hope for the one room school (late 1800s - c.1952) which was located at the present day intersection of Fair Hope, Findley, and Yeager roads. It was named for James Jefferson "Squire Jim" Phillips (1855-1937), a farmer who served as a Justice of the Peace for Roaring Creek District and whose family owned a majority of the land that now encompasses the community.

The Phillips Chapel United Methodist Church is the center of the community. The congregation was organized in the early 1940s by Rev. Meade Gutshall and local families. Services were held outdoors, weather permitting. A church was finally constructed in 1951 with the help of many residents of the community who pulled together the funds and their own labor to complete the building. The land on which the church stands was sold to the congregation by the Midland Corporation, aka the West Virginia Coal and Coke Company, for the sum of $1.00 in 1945. Many family reunions and civic groups utilize the church's adjacent park and pavilion.

The Phillips Cemetery was established by the Moses J. Phillips family around the 1870s as a burial ground for the poor and indigent. Civil War veteran, farmer, and coal miner Moses J. Phillips served as a county Overseer of the Poor from 1872 through 1877. The oldest known grave is that of War of 1812 veteran Dudley A. Gibson, which dates back to the year of 1873. Both Union and Confederate veterans of the Civil War are buried there. Many Phillips family descendants, as well as residents of Jimtown, are also resting there.




Historical Marker - Side #1 - Located on CR 151 (Old Rt 33) in Jimtown WV.

GPS: Lat 38.915607 Lon -80.001147





Historical Marker - Side #2. Being the curious type, I wanted to find the Phillips Cemetery and visit Private Gibson's grave.





View northeast on CR 151 (Old Rt 33) towards Norton.





View southwest on CR 151 (Old Rt 33) towards Buckhannon.
The Phillips Cemetery is ahead about 200 meters, then right another 200 meters.





Phillips Cemetery located on Jimtown Road about 300 meters (as the crow flies) south-west of the marker.

GPS: Lat 38.915565 Lon -80.003689





Cemetery has many veterans' graves - well marked.





After a little searching, I found the grave of Private Dudley Gibson.





Closeup of Private Dudley Gibson's grave marker.
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Old 10-28-2013, 05:44 PM   #1395
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Located in St Albans WV right off of rt 60 on the river-side of the road is the Morgan Kitchen Cabin. This cabin served as a kitchen for John Morgans farm. The day before the battle of Scary (sounds scary too me!) Union troops were fed out of this cabin.


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