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Old 08-23-2013, 10:23 PM   #1
ciedema OP
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Flushing ABS Brakes / Stopping Fluid Boil

I routinely find myself boiling brake fluid, I did this on my 950 and now my 990. I really need pump some fresh fluid through the system as it happened often enough the fluid is well past it. So it flushing the ABS brakes the same as doing non ABS ones? (ie keeping adding fluid to the master cylinder while pumping it through the slave).

So on to my other question, I tend to trail brake a lot, especially when riding off road and can boil the brakes pretty quickly if I am not careful. I doubt that I am the only one who experiences this. So have other come up with a solution to stop this from happening?
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Old 08-23-2013, 10:29 PM   #2
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I think I noticed that Slavens is selling a brake fluid radiator/cooler thingy.

BTW I just bled the rear in the normal way and it worked, but I was really careful not to let the level fall to low - if you got air in the ABS circuit - who knows?
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Old 08-23-2013, 10:48 PM   #3
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I think I noticed that Slavens is selling a brake fluid radiator/cooler thingy.

BTW I just bled the rear in the normal way and it worked, but I was really careful not to let the level fall to low - if you got air in the ABS circuit - who knows?
I replace the fluid and bleed them normally, then go out and skid all over the place the get the anti skid moving fluid around inside and bleed it again.

Don't know if it gets it all but it's fun.
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Old 08-24-2013, 12:27 AM   #4
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Yep you can bleed normally, its nice to have a big jug of fluid, as you know its a long push, master to the pump then the caliper. I always did the caliper furthest from the master first. I don't think i could do it alone, my arms not long enough.

I have been using a good vacuum that hooks to the compressor to do it the the last few years, and i can do it on my own.

As for the rear its just seems like a small reservoir and heats up fast.
On the rear i took off the abs line to it and plugged the pump and got a hose from an S model. I like the abs on the front only, works well for me.
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Old 08-27-2013, 06:23 PM   #5
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Thanks Guys - I plan to do this tomorrow or the day after.

This is the link to the Slavens cooler I wonder how well it works, there has been times that I have stopped and poured cold water on the caliper to get braking back.

http://www.slavensracing.com/shop/mu...990-by-slavens
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Old 08-27-2013, 07:39 PM   #6
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A KTM mechanic I trust had me remove the rear caliper and flip it upside to start the bleed process. Oil floats on water, so water will sink to the bottom of the upside-down caliper, and you get all of the water out that way.

I lost my rear coming down off of Mt. Evans in Colorado a couple years ago. I was trailing a slow Range Rover, and engine braking wasn't cutting it. I was on pavement, so I could use the front. After the back brake started coming back a little, I started alternating back, front, back, front, etc. Doesn't really work very well on the loose stuff. There, it would be back, front, {faceplant}.

My sis on the top of Mt. Evans:

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Old 08-27-2013, 10:12 PM   #7
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I had this problem in Mexico and it has persisted ever since. I have noticed that the rear master get hot from the exhaust
with out using the brake. I think this may have something to do with it surly it doesn't help. Have 2 to one exhaust maybe generates more heat? Talked to a guy who had his pipes ceramic coated I know from my car this helps the pipe run cooler. Some kind of heat shield would be cheaper. I did flush the system when I got back..

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Old 08-28-2013, 12:42 AM   #8
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Probably need to look into hetting rear brakes from the 1190? as it is bigger and will work more efficiently without overcooking itself
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:38 PM   #9
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Boiling the brakes is pretty common on Dirt bikes. The fix is a solid rear rotor, not sure if anyone makes one for the 990, Motul RBF 600 fluid, and the most important one, adjust the brake lever. The solid rear rotor helps disipate heat better, the fluid boils at a higher temp, and you need to stop riding the rear brake. You would be surprised at how much difference a little adjustment makes. You may not realize it but you can just be putting a little pressure on the pedal causing excess heat.
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Old 08-29-2013, 08:00 AM   #10
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Boiling the brakes is pretty common on Dirt bikes. The fix is a solid rear rotor, not sure if anyone makes one for the 990, Motul RBF 600 fluid, and the most important one, adjust the brake lever. The solid rear rotor helps disipate heat better, the fluid boils at a higher temp, and you need to stop riding the rear brake. You would be surprised at how much difference a little adjustment makes. You may not realize it but you can just be putting a little pressure on the pedal causing excess heat.
Its not from unintentionally dragging the rear brake, rather doing so deliberately. I tend drag through loose stuff and washboard, when I ride hard on the pavement I also trail brake a lot. Its to the point that it is almost predictable. I find myself checking pedal pressure before going into a corner.
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Old 08-29-2013, 10:39 PM   #11
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Soo, that's the culprit when we were coming down a series of long steep hills in Guatemala. The misses didn't like it either, but it doesn't help when I'm cursing, f~k f~k sh!t damn out loud. I wasn't sure what that was I got accustomed to pumping the brakes before corners and when finally down and on the flats it went away. I knew the brake fluid could be changed so I thought that could be the culprit. Thus a brake fluid change once back in Xela. Good to know! Does the front ever do the same? I have a tendency to use the fronts when approaching corners on pavement. When I did bleed the system, filled, pumped, bled, filled, pumped, bled, repeat. I did this until the fluid was coming out clean.
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