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Old 09-05-2013, 02:08 PM   #16
disston
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Carry a complete spare ignition system in the original packages. You need, depending on who's electronic system you have, but typically, a Hall sensor (might be a good idea to have the whole assmebly if the Hall sensor is installed in some part difficult to take apart), a module and spare coil or coils.

There are other parts that are typically carried as spares by riders, such as spark plugs and wires and plug caps. A good assortment of these can be helpful.
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disston screwed with this post 09-05-2013 at 04:51 PM
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Old 09-05-2013, 02:55 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biebs View Post
Are you prepared to bypass the oil cooler in an emergency to get you out of the Desert??

This happened to me a few weeks ago. The bike was only put on the road in January this year and had only done about 10,000Km when the $500.00 oil cooler split for no apparent reason, pumping out about 9/10 of the oil before I realised what had happened.



At the time, the only way to bypass the oil cooler was to remove the lines and pack the banjo union with copper washers; this got me the couple of thousand kilometres home.


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Old 09-05-2013, 04:46 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsd4me View Post
This happened to me a few weeks ago. The bike was only put on the road in January this year and had only done about 10,000Km when the $500.00 oil cooler split for no apparent reason, pumping out about 9/10 of the oil before I realised what had happened.

At the time, the only way to bypass the oil cooler was to remove the lines and pack the banjo union with copper washers; this got me the couple of thousand kilometres home.
HOLY CRAP!

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Old 09-05-2013, 04:50 PM   #19
disston
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gsd4me,

AC Rat is not going to be able to sleep now. That's cruel.

Since you have definitely topped my swipe at electronic ignition bikes I'm going to edit my snide remark out. I feel so sorry for the guy now.
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Old 09-05-2013, 07:07 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Dual plugging is for raising compression.
OR gaining economy - more mpg. Less fuel to carry for range (that might be required depending on the Desert).

------------
A sump guard spreads the impact of a sharp rock over a larger area...

If the sump cracks or holes - remove , clean, araldite .. if you have a large hole put something in there to act as a filler/strengthener .. beer can bits, wood, whatever. Then araldite. If it is cool speed up the araldite setting by using heat eg warmth from a camp fire.

-------------
Tyre patch kit with at least one case patch. And several tubes to fit.

--------------
Car batteries are cheap and have more AH. But do vibration isolate them similar to what bm did with the original battery. And run live unfused wires very carefully! Bring all the fuses over close to the battery for safety.

Good Luck.
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Old 09-06-2013, 12:44 AM   #21
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Speaking of electronic ignitions.

Check these out.


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=823543
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Old 09-06-2013, 06:38 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disston View Post
gsd4me, AC Rat is not going to be able to sleep now. That's cruel. Since you have definitely topped my swipe at electronic ignition bikes I'm going to edit my snide remark out. I feel so sorry for the guy now.
Don't worry, with a sidecar I can always fill it with bins of spare parts!

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Old 09-06-2013, 07:49 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warin View Post
OR gaining economy - more mpg. Less fuel to carry for range (that might be required depending on the Desert).

------------
A sump guard spreads the impact of a sharp rock over a larger area...

If the sump cracks or holes - remove , clean, araldite .. if you have a large hole put something in there to act as a filler/strengthener .. beer can bits, wood, whatever. Then araldite. If it is cool speed up the araldite setting by using heat eg warmth from a camp fire.

-------------
Tyre patch kit with at least one case patch. And several tubes to fit.

--------------
Car batteries are cheap and have more AH. But do vibration isolate them similar to what bm did with the original battery. And run live unfused wires very carefully! Bring all the fuses over close to the battery for safety.

Good Luck.
Not in my experience. Sure, you can lean the bikes out after you dual plug them but you can do that before you dual plug them. BTDT
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Old 09-06-2013, 08:46 AM   #24
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Thumb araldite - 2 part epoxy fo us US chaps

araldite - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araldite

Had to look this up -interesting


Ok now back to the question - With post showing what an oil cooler can do I would sugest having the correct fittings /tools to block off the oil cooler in case of a leak carriny the correct fittings should not require a sidecar ( ie should not take up to much space)

Now question to gsd4me did you have the stack of copper washers on your bike when the cooler split or was that a extra trip?? Tell us how long it took to do that repair with travel time to get washers ect. Thanks
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:19 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warin View Post
snip ... RE: Dual Plugging
OR gaining economy - more mpg. Less fuel to carry for range (that might be required depending on the Desert).

Quote:
Originally Posted by supershaft View Post
Not in my experience. Sure, you can lean the bikes out after you dual plug them but you can do that before you dual plug them. BTDT
+1 Not in my experience either. Dual plugging will allow you to run some really nasty gas ... like 81 octane and such. But it neither gave me more horsepower, or better economy. And with the addition of a Dyna power booster, and more plugs and wires ... it just looks to me to be more points of failure.

Now ... one could say that being able to run 81 octane would make the bike more reliable GLOBALLY ... but ...
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Old 09-08-2013, 02:42 AM   #26
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+1 Not in my experience either. Dual plugging will allow you to run some really nasty gas ... like 81 octane and such. But it neither gave me more horsepower, or better economy. And with the addition of a Dyna power booster, and more plugs and wires ... it just looks to me to be more points of failure.

Now ... one could say that being able to run 81 octane would make the bike more reliable GLOBALLY ... but ...
If you don't tune the ignition to take advantage of the dual plugs then you won't get the most out of it. pretty much just good for burning low octane and giving snappy starts. The newer electronic modules have curves for the dual plugs so I think the tuning is becoming less of an issue than it once was.

If you have to run a booster then you have an extra component to fail. However you can carry a spare or just a half dozen or more sets of points (and a points file) and those will limp it a long ways (>100 miles). You get redundancy on the plugs and wires so greater level of reliability there.

If you have a nice, stable, long lived and reliable electronic ignition rather than stone age, unstable, high maintenance, short lived mechanical switching, then you just get the redundancy of the extra plugs and wires. It's all good.

The OEM BMW electronic ignitions get a bum rap because after 35+ years they can fail. geeze. Maybe time for a new one? The electronic ignition in my toyota has a rock solid reputation to 350,000 miles. hard to argue with. $300 for a new one tho'. A Chevy unit can substitute. Carry a spare.

A huge downside of the electronic module is running an open plug wire (a very possible error) will destroy them immediately. Carry a spare. Plugs in in < 5 minutes. On a dual plug setup you would have to run two plug wires open to do damage, so more a bit more robust.

I have had 4 electronic modules fail (in 25+ years). 3 from old age (two I bought used---dumb idea) and one from user f*&^up. I carry a spare. It's smaller than a tin of mints. My points failed (bad cam nose) at about 65,000 miles and I lost them for an electronic (and dual plugs). Never looked back.
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Old 09-08-2013, 04:01 AM   #27
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Here's the story.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Biebs View Post
Now question to gsd4me did you have the stack of copper washers on your bike when the cooler split or was that a extra trip?? Tell us how long it took to do that repair with travel time to get washers ect.



My riding partner, Ray Peake, built both these bikes and usually carries a blanking plate in case his bike has oil cooler problems. Although the oil cooler setup is different on both bikes he could have sorted things quite easily to get me going, but unfortunately he left the blanking plate at home and had to resort to plan "B". Luckily with him, there are always at least a couple of different ways he can fix a problem.

We were only about 3 miles from the South Aust/West Aust border, but facilities there are only fuel and food. 10 miles into WA at Eucla there are some mechanical facilities and an friendly WA police person took time out from doing RBT`s to wake up the mechanic there to tell him Ray was fast approaching to get some copper washers.

Once we had the washers it was an easy task to remove the banjo union and pad things out. We were unable to undo the thermostat housing as it had been loctited in so we did a days ride and were able to break the seal then as it had softened a bit due to the heat.

We would have lost about 1 1/2 hours on the side of the road (including travel time to get the washers) and about 1/2 hour at the end of the day removing the thermostat. If I had carried a bypass line and a bit of oil I could have been back on the road in about 1/2 hour.



Ray has ordered a bypass line that can be connected to the two points where the copper washers are in case of trouble in the future.

What happened to my bike is extremely unusual and I reckon I just got a dud cooler, but getting a rock through the cooler or having an oil line torn off can quite easily happen, so a way to bypass the oil cooler should always be carried.

The blue "R80" G/SPD was has been fully rebuilt and has early model R100 S mechanicals (40mm Bings etc), lower first gear, higher fifth gear, 25mm swingarm extension, plus, plus. It goes like stink, gets exceptional fuel economy and is stone axe reliable.

The link to my bikes build is in my sig line, if you're interested.
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Old 09-08-2013, 10:47 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsd4me View Post



My riding partner, Ray Peake, built both these bikes and usually carries a blanking plate in case his bike has oil cooler problems. Although the oil cooler setup is different on both bikes he could have sorted things quite easily to get me going, but unfortunately he left the blanking plate at home and had to resort to plan "B". Luckily with him, there are always at least a couple of different ways he can fix a problem.

We were only about 3 miles from the South Aust/West Aust border, but facilities there are only fuel and food. 10 miles into WA at Eucla there are some mechanical facilities and an friendly WA police person took time out from doing RBT`s to wake up the mechanic there to tell him Ray was fast approaching to get some copper washers.

Once we had the washers it was an easy task to remove the banjo union and pad things out. We were unable to undo the thermostat housing as it had been loctited in so we did a days ride and were able to break the seal then as it had softened a bit due to the heat.

We would have lost about 1 1/2 hours on the side of the road (including travel time to get the washers) and about 1/2 hour at the end of the day removing the thermostat. If I had carried a bypass line and a bit of oil I could have been back on the road in about 1/2 hour.



Ray has ordered a bypass line that can be connected to the two points where the copper washers are in case of trouble in the future.

What happened to my bike is extremely unusual and I reckon I just got a dud cooler, but getting a rock through the cooler or having an oil line torn off can quite easily happen, so a way to bypass the oil cooler should always be carried.

The blue "R80" G/SPD was has been fully rebuilt and has early model R100 S mechanicals (40mm Bings etc), lower first gear, higher fifth gear, 25mm swingarm extension, plus, plus. It goes like stink, gets exceptional fuel economy and is stone axe reliable.

The link to my bikes build is in my sig line, if you're interested.
This would have to be that part http://www.touratech-usa.com/Store/2...By-Pass-R100GS

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Old 09-08-2013, 12:30 PM   #29
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Whilst Touratech may be convenient, any hydraulics place should be able to make bypass hoses (for a lot cheaper).
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Old 09-09-2013, 02:02 AM   #30
gsd4me
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Whilst Touratech may be convenient, any hydraulics place should be able to make bypass hoses (for a lot cheaper).

Too true.
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