ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-09-2013, 06:57 AM   #2041
RoninMoto OP
Wanderer
 
RoninMoto's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: EN ZED
Oddometer: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackcaps View Post
Well had planned that more or less but as Mr. Horak is not reacting on that post nor on an email I think it's better not to do that. I travelled two days with him and Svieta and it was nice...
Sorry for not responding blackcaps. Prior to this wifi was.. well.. no where to be found? Your pictures were great. I spend the past few days with bike club here in Yuzhno. (thanks for the contact) If you have more pictures, feel free to post. Also a link to your RR if/when you do one! I've been busy doing some moto repairs and trying to get documents in place for Japan. Tomorrow I will find out how hard it is to enter japan without a carnet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LethPhaos View Post
good luck in japan!
I seem to have missed when you switched from giant loop to magadan luggage? that's what those are, right?
Not Magadan luggage. It is the Giant loop Siskiyou pannier. Harold and the crew sent them to me when I was in Georgia to beat the piss out of them and see how they held up. 33,000 km of hard offroad in the stans and Siberia and they are still working/looking great. I like them more then the Great Basin for this type of travel.


(Georgia flashback)
__________________
Noah 08 KTM 690 ADV. 125,000 km. 42 countries. 5 continents and counting.
RTW Ride Report --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=781893
Blog ------------------> http://rtwwithnoah.blogspot.com/
Facebook------------> https://www.facebook.com/RtwWithNoah

RoninMoto screwed with this post 09-09-2013 at 07:11 AM
RoninMoto is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 04:43 PM   #2042
hardwaregrrl
You talkin' to me?
 
hardwaregrrl's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Atlanta
Oddometer: 6,945
So Noah, how do they attach at the bottom? or is the load being carried completly by the section over the seat.?


Quote:
Originally Posted by RoninMoto View Post

Not Magadan luggage. It is the Giant loop Siskiyou pannier. Harold and the crew sent them to me when I was in Georgia to beat the piss out of them and see how they held up. 33,000 km of hard offroad in the stans and Siberia and they are still working/looking great. I like them more then the Great Basin for this type of travel.


(Georgia flashback)
hardwaregrrl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 02:45 AM   #2043
RoninMoto OP
Wanderer
 
RoninMoto's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: EN ZED
Oddometer: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by hardwaregrrl View Post
So Noah, how do they attach at the bottom? or is the load being carried completly by the section over the seat.?
On the front there are straps that connect to the frame. There is also dazy-chained webbing on the inside to use to attach. All the weight is carried by the section over the seat.
__________________
Noah 08 KTM 690 ADV. 125,000 km. 42 countries. 5 continents and counting.
RTW Ride Report --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=781893
Blog ------------------> http://rtwwithnoah.blogspot.com/
Facebook------------> https://www.facebook.com/RtwWithNoah
RoninMoto is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 05:20 AM   #2044
hardwaregrrl
You talkin' to me?
 
hardwaregrrl's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Atlanta
Oddometer: 6,945
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoninMoto View Post
On the front there are straps that connect to the frame. There is also dazy-chained webbing on the inside to use to attach. All the weight is carried by the section over the seat.
Good to know. Thanks!
hardwaregrrl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 07:27 AM   #2045
E-Bum
Studly Adventurer
 
E-Bum's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Oddometer: 653
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoninMoto View Post
On the front there are straps that connect to the frame. There is also dazy-chained webbing on the inside to use to attach. All the weight is carried by the section over the seat.

I love the look and the concept of these bags. I have never ridden with hard luggage, but have witnessed the damage they receive from even small falls (and depending on the build, they transfer the force to the subframe or luggage rack). I've taken falls with my soft luggage and I like that the bags themselves absorb much of the impact. However, I'm wondering about these things:

1. When I've taken a fall, the luggage straps get strained, sometimes to failure. It'd be great if my bags were engineered so that the strap itself would snap first, but I've had the material that the strap attaches to on the bag itself rip before the strap or plastic connections fail, thus putting a huge hole in my bag. Have you had any experiences where you sustained damage to those GL bags? If so, where did it fail? I don't care about a broken strap... but a ripped bag is a bigger issue.

2. Maybe just a quick comment on how you deal with security? The advantage of hard bags is that they are fixed to the rack and you can lock them. The only thing I've come up with riding around South America (or anywhere really) is to have someone keep an eye on the bikes... not sure if you've come up with anything else (a la James Bond's BMW perhaps?)
E-Bum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 08:42 AM   #2046
ThisWayHome
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: San Francisco
Oddometer: 66
High reliability...? It is funny how people observe the same basic events and reach opposite conclusions. I'm reading through his ordeals on the road with the 690. I'm scared to buy one for an international trip. Then again, I have minimal mechanical skills at the moment, but with a 990 seeing a lot of off-road duty in Iceland, I'm getting better each day figuring out what the heck is wrong with the bike.


Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic wildchild View Post
hi noah
i know you probably don't care but your adventure made me buy a 690 too last day.
you proofed to me the high reliability and capabilities of this bike!

keep rocking the world

ThisWayHome screwed with this post 09-10-2013 at 09:11 AM
ThisWayHome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 03:43 PM   #2047
RoninMoto OP
Wanderer
 
RoninMoto's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: EN ZED
Oddometer: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThisWayHome View Post
High reliability...? It is funny how people observe the same basic events and reach opposite conclusions. I'm reading through his ordeals on the road with the 690. I'm scared to buy one for an international trip. Then again, I have minimal mechanical skills at the moment, but with a 990 seeing a lot of off-road duty in Iceland, I'm getting better each day figuring out what the heck is wrong with the bike.
83,000 km on a single. Still pulling strong. Compared to Hondas, BMWs and Yamahas with broken suspension and motor problems at the Oasis in UB.. My bike is highly reliable. Especially considering the way I ride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Bum View Post
I love the look and the concept of these bags. I have never ridden with hard luggage, but have witnessed the damage they receive from even small falls (and depending on the build, they transfer the force to the subframe or luggage rack). I've taken falls with my soft luggage and I like that the bags themselves absorb much of the impact. However, I'm wondering about these things:

1. When I've taken a fall, the luggage straps get strained, sometimes to failure. It'd be great if my bags were engineered so that the strap itself would snap first, but I've had the material that the strap attaches to on the bag itself rip before the strap or plastic connections fail, thus putting a huge hole in my bag. Have you had any experiences where you sustained damage to those GL bags? If so, where did it fail? I don't care about a broken strap... but a ripped bag is a bigger issue.

2. Maybe just a quick comment on how you deal with security? The advantage of hard bags is that they are fixed to the rack and you can lock them. The only thing I've come up with riding around South America (or anywhere really) is to have someone keep an eye on the bikes... not sure if you've come up with anything else (a la James Bond's BMW perhaps?)
1. I fall a lot. bags are designed really well. they stay in place and the outer material has not ripped. I had a small issue with putting fuel in the 690... so i cut a hole in the top of the velcro area to access the fuel cap.

2. I have a lock an chain for the bike. Most of the time in russia I was able to get an indoor garage to put the bike into. I pull the inner dry bags if I feel it is a sketchy area. I'm at a hostel in Wakkanai Japan. I didn't take my bags off or chain the bike up last night but it is not visible from the street. An ugly cover is a great option. I will get one soon.
__________________
Noah 08 KTM 690 ADV. 125,000 km. 42 countries. 5 continents and counting.
RTW Ride Report --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=781893
Blog ------------------> http://rtwwithnoah.blogspot.com/
Facebook------------> https://www.facebook.com/RtwWithNoah
RoninMoto is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 04:44 PM   #2048
JustBob
Uh...who me?
 
JustBob's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2004
Location: Young Harris, GA
Oddometer: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoninMoto View Post
83,000 km on a single. Still pulling strong. Compared to Hondas, BMWs and Yamahas with broken suspension and motor problems at the Oasis in UB.. My bike is highly reliable. Especially considering the way I ride.
Noah, what are the main/recurring problems you've had with this bike? Mostly what I see on ADV rider is electrical and fuel filtering problems. Motor, clutch, suspension, frame....all the main stuff seems to hold up.
__________________
Bob Hancock
'14 R1200GSW
'10 690 EnduroR
'11 WR250R
'88 R100RS
JustBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 05:07 PM   #2049
RoninMoto OP
Wanderer
 
RoninMoto's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: EN ZED
Oddometer: 1,604
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustBob View Post
Noah, what are the main/recurring problems you've had with this bike? Mostly what I see on ADV rider is electrical and fuel filtering problems. Motor, clutch, suspension, frame....all the main stuff seems to hold up.
Yes. Motor, clutch, suspension, frame... all great. I have not had problems with fueling. I put a fuel filter out side the tank and put a Profilter sock before the pump.

I have had 2 recurring problems.
1. Low voltage lead to coil has broken.. 5 times now. One of these days I will do a good permanent fix to it..

2. Auto decompress has been an issue.
It all started at 50,000 km in turkey. When I was checking my valve clearance, i noticed the auto decompress shaft was not laying flat at running RPM and hitting the exhaust roller.

I learned that the cam was updated from 08 to 09 and I put a new cam, auto decompress, weight, and all hardware.

At about 70,000 km in mongolia, the bike would not start. The auto decompress was not engaging. The screw for the weight came loose and had backed out some. this pulled on the shaft and made the copper clip fail.

I made a new clip and put it back together. I did not know that the decompress weight had been damaged It now had enough play to keep putting pressure on the same clip. I rode back through mongolia and the clip came off in irkutsk again. This is where I realized I needed a new weight. $15 dollar part but I had only new clips sent in. So I "machined" a washer to take the slop out of the weight. We rode the BAM and I rode on to Sakhalin before changing out the weight and clip for a new one. Now she should be good.

I have not heard of anyone else having this problem. And most of it stemmed from not wanting to wait for parts and/or not fixing it properly/completely. I was doing siberian fixes... get you down the road
__________________
Noah 08 KTM 690 ADV. 125,000 km. 42 countries. 5 continents and counting.
RTW Ride Report --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=781893
Blog ------------------> http://rtwwithnoah.blogspot.com/
Facebook------------> https://www.facebook.com/RtwWithNoah
RoninMoto is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 05:35 PM   #2050
c-zulu
Resident Dirt Burner
 
c-zulu's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: North shore of Gitchigumi
Oddometer: 1,245
Have a sweet ride in the Land of the Rising Sun..

Question, Transport to Hokkaido, from where and how long (Time)?
__________________
Current Rides:
HONDA CRF450X---BUELL XB12X
KTM 950 SER---KTM 950 ADV S---KTM 690 ER
MOTO GUZZI STELVIO NTX---VICTORY KINGPIN TOUR

c-zulu screwed with this post 09-10-2013 at 06:07 PM
c-zulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 06:44 PM   #2051
GearWhore
Running fans the flames
 
GearWhore's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Minneapolis
Oddometer: 477
As people question, you seem to have the mentality that I find in most successful RTW riders...fixing becomes part of the ride. It is just part of the day, week, month. Nothing more or less...it just is. Doesn't matter the bike, there will be challenges and it is what you make of it.

Keep up the great attitude and enjoy.

Gus "Gearwhore"
GearWhore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 08:06 PM   #2052
poppawheelie
Studly Adventurer
 
poppawheelie's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 533
Noah, how do you hook up to Wifi in Russia and other countries? Is there some gizmo you plug into a USB port on a computer bought in the USA to make it work over there? Thanks in advance. Keep on truck'n. I've been following the whole trip.
__________________
"To me the trail is calling! The old trail - the trail that is always new." Matthew Alexander Henson

"It's not the destination. It's the journey." Me
poppawheelie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 08:59 PM   #2053
motoreiter
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Moscow, Russia
Oddometer: 1,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by poppawheelie View Post
Noah, how do you hook up to Wifi in Russia and other countries? Is there some gizmo you plug into a USB port on a computer bought in the USA to make it work over there?
Not sure what Noah did, but if your hotel provides WiFi (and you laptop is WiFi capable) you should just be able to turn on your computer and get access (assuming you have any necessary passwords, etc.)

As an alternative to WiFi, many cell phones will allow you to access the cellular network for wireless internet access and then use your phone as a WiFi access point. Pretty slick. Or you could buy a wireless modem to plug into your USB port.
__________________
Adventure is just another word for poor planning.
http://www.motoreiter.com
motoreiter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 09:30 PM   #2054
yokesman
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Oddometer: 460
can you give us the info on the transport to japan?
yokesman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 06:50 AM   #2055
RoninMoto OP
Wanderer
 
RoninMoto's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2010
Location: EN ZED
Oddometer: 1,604
My last days in Mongolia

July 19 to 23. UB.
We stayed up late drinking beer every night. We ate fried food every meal. We slept in late. We said we would leave tomorrow but something always kept us from leaving. The Oasis is awesome but it is a black hole. You will never understand it until you stay/live there. We found a gem of a motorcycle shop in the northern part of UB. It is located at 47.968347,106.90721 It is an “unofficial KTM” shop but they had 2 990 ADVs, an 1190 ADV, a 390 duke, a 690 duke, a 350 freeride, 2 530 quads and a handful of 450/530 motos... all new. There were about 20 other used bikes there in various forms of repair, sale or disrepair. There were 2 that really caught my eye. A factor ktm 640 rally bike and an Aprilia 450 RXV. I am not sure how or why these 2 bikes were in Mongolia but they were definitely not appreciated. He also had a whole lot of KTM parts, accessories and clothing. Plus a 40' container full of brand new MotoZ tires and tubes. If you need dirt tires in UB. This is the guy to go to. This looked like a KTM shop but it was not the official KTM shop in UB. Kurts bike had been sitting in UB for over a year and it had some problems with the cooling system. The water that was in it corroded one of the pipes and the radiator to the point that there were pinhole leaks. The shop sold Kurt one of the radiators from a brand new 990 ADV. When we were running the bike and we saw water leaking from the radiator, we thought he was screwed. But 1 day and $500 later, he was back in business.


The austrian had bearings that failed in the hub of his 950 SE. I had a bent rear rim so I decided to take some measurements. The rims is the same width but the hub is different. You can also see the drilling for the spokes are different. I decided not to take my rim apart and run it dented.


Kim's BMW with the suspension out. 1 of 5 or so BMW with suspension problems in Mongolia.


A group of 8 guys from the UK were planning on riding Honda C50s back to the UK. We wished them luck. I don't remember the website.. if anyone knows, I'd like to see how they are doing.






A BMW with catostrophic suspension failure.




I want it. It should not be in this form.


Just sitting outside :(










The owner.




The guard doggie.

July 24. UB to Camping on the way to Gobi. 229 km
I left the Oasis late in the afternoon and rode out to the giant Genghis Khan monument. It really is quite large.. and shiny. It was interesting to see. I snapped a few pictures and got down the road. I was riding south on a new tarmac road but I knew it was only a matter of time before it turned to dirt. I didn't want to be on a main route when it turned. Many times it had slowed me to 30 or 40 km/h because of all the potholes and washboard. There are no smooth routes.. only 10 or 15 twisting shitty small roads that cover a 1 km wide path across the Mongolian landscape. I enjoy the less traveled roads much more. I much perfer to pick my way through the maze of 2 track. Even on the twisty or sandy ones, I can keep my moving average above 70 km/h. Plus, I don't beat myself and bike to shit. About 150 km south of UB it was getting close to dark so I found a nice place to camp.






You can climb up inside. But they wanted money for that. I don't remember how much. I just remember smiling and walking out. I hate tourist traps that you have to pay to walk up stairs. Iffel tower, you are one of them!


Looked like a great start to a motorcross track.


Good roads.


July 25. To Gobi. 610 km
I was on the road early and eating breakfast Mandalgov. A pile of noodles with “meat” and a fatty sauce on top. I use the term “meat” because in Mongolia, you never know what it is. It is never high quality. They use all of the animal. Fat isn't cut off, its no different from the other meat. Cut it up and throw it in the pot. I had about 300 km to Dalansadgad. The first 50 or 60 km were brand new paved road. This is great because the food was still heavy in my stomach. Bumps would not have been my friend. Soon enough the road work stopped and the GPS map was no longer useful. Point in a direction of the town you want to get to, pick a track, and when it starts to turn away from that town, find another track. It was late afternoon when I got into Dalandzagad and I was considering staying in a hotel but I ended up driving around the town and not seeing anything appealing. A quick fuel stop and I was deeper into the Gobi. I came upon a family in a small car with a flat tire. Again, this was a new car with no spare tire. There was a mom, dad, grandfather and a few small kids. We used my pump to fill the tire and the puncture was found quickly. I knew the only way I would be able to patch it would be to take the tire off the rim and put a patch on the inside. I had the patches and glue, but I had a feeling the Mongolians didn't want to do this fix. Plus, I couldn't talk to them so I let them patch it Mongolian style. I watched in amazement as the dad ripped a rag and jammed it into the tire with a screw driver. A primitive plug you could maybe call it. He would push it in and it would stop leaking, then push on the tire and it would start to bubble. He quickly put the tire back on the car, filled it once more and it was a Mongolian fire drill to get the kids and all the crap back into this tiny car. They left and I didn't know how far they made it. It was at least 20 km to Dalandzagad. The guy even forgot his sandals. At this point I needed to find a good camp spot so I kept heading west. I camped north of Bayandalai. The road I was on went into the washout of a canyon. It went up this washout for 15 or so km then there was a plateau. Down the other side in another washout. I guess that is the easiest way to make a road. Let the water smooth it.















Travelin' light.

July 26. Gobi to UB. 684 km
It rained throughout the night and I woke up to clouds in the morning. I had about 50 km to Bulgan where I ate breakfast. Some sort of meat dumpling. Every central Asian country has some form or another. In Mongolia though, they are much more gamey. I was curious what the “dinosaur” waypoint was on my GPS so I went to find out. Apparently at one point there were fossils here but they were probably long gone. The fire cliffs were cool but I did not understand how this is a tourist destination for people coming from UB. There were 6 or 7 different Ger camps for tour groups. Luckily it seemed like I was the only person around. The road north was great. Sand and fast. I passed through a dry lake bed. It was very interesting to ride. inch of crust and 3 or 4 inches of soft underneath. The road was about 8 inches of rutted soft crap so riding it was out of the question. Riding out of the track, if the front tire broke through it would give you the wiggles and push hard. Scary stuff. I had to stand up and shift my weight as far back as possible, 2 and 3rd*gear high in the RPMs. This worked pretty well but I didn't dare push my luck and go for any speed records. I was getting very low on fuel when I got to Saikhan Ovoo. I had used my front tanks and main tank. I was down to 5 liter in the spare rear tank. I like to keep this as a reserve. It gives me about 100km for emergencys. I pulled up to a line of a few cars at the pump and I wait for 5 cars. There is 1 more in front of me when the power in the town dies. No way to pump gas now. I wait for 15 minutes in a group of about 15 cars now. It could be 1 minute, it could be 1 hour, it could be 1 day. No one knows how long. I get out my map and point to another town. The lady says there is benzine and they say it is 100 km away. So I throw common sense in the trash and head north into the desert again. My fuel light comes on about 25 km from Adaatsag and I ride in with about 1 liter to spare. When I get to the pump, there is no one working. This is common in small towns in Mongolia. Soon a guy pulls up on a scooter. He starts looking at my bike and I tell him I want fuel. Soon a truck pulls up and stopps. After another 10 minutes the guy shows up an a Chinese copy of a Chinese copy of a Japanese motorcycle. I fill up with 80 octane, put some octane booster in and head north. Soon i'm back on the same road north of Mandalgov. Its newly paved and I get a false sense of confidence. I'm thinking good, I can burn pavement back to UB. Wrong. After 80 or so km the pavement ends with no warning. I hit was day dreaming at 120 km/h and managed to slow her down to about 80 km/h before launching off into the dirt. I was awake again time to stand up and strech these legs. The next few hours were horrible rutted, bumpy, overused “gravel” roads heading to UB. I got into UB just before sundown and went back to the Oasis. Beer and fried food were waiting.


The road in the canyon.




Lady wo made me breakfast.


GPS point “dinosaurs”




“fire cliffs”








Fast sandy track going north.







The crazy lake bed.






all the tracks suck.

July 27. UB
In the time I was in the Gobi, Kim's new suspension parts had gotten in and he had his bike back together.
Kurt's bike had been sitting in UB for over a year and it had some problems with the cooling system. The water that was in it corroded one of the pipes and the radiator to the point that there were pinhole leaks.When we were running the bike and we saw water leaking from the radiator, we thought he was screwed. But 1 day and $500 later, he was back in business. The unofficial KTM shop sold Kurt one of the radiators from a brand new 990 ADV. We would leave for Russia the next day. I went back to the KTM shop to get heavy duty tubes.
Somewhere in the gobi I had tipped my bike over and I deveoped a small radiator leak myself. This would have to wait till russia to get welded.

July 28. UB to Camping near a Yeroo River. 308 km
We left early afternoon and headed north. Near Darkhan we went to a river where I thought I lost my fly real. No luck finding it. It had been over a month and a local had probably picked it up. Soon we found a good river and followed it west about 20 km. Kim and I wanted to fish so we set up camp next to a big bend in the river. All I could catch with the fly rod were small chubs but Kim caught 2 nice perch and a trout. We ate fried fish then noodles in the dark after a beautiful sunset. We would hit the Russian border in the morning.






__________________
Noah 08 KTM 690 ADV. 125,000 km. 42 countries. 5 continents and counting.
RTW Ride Report --> http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=781893
Blog ------------------> http://rtwwithnoah.blogspot.com/
Facebook------------> https://www.facebook.com/RtwWithNoah

RoninMoto screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 03:57 AM Reason: Added location for KTM shop in UB
RoninMoto is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 11:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014