ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Regional forums > Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-11-2013, 05:44 AM   #16
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Monroe County courthouse in the city of Forsyth



Location: Forsyth
Date Built:1896
Architectural Style: High Victorian Eclectic
Designer: Bruce & Morgan

Other Information: Monroe County's first courthouse, built in Forsyth in 1825, served the county until torn down in 1895 or 1896. The present two-story, brick courthouse was completed in 1896 (see photo 1 and photo 2). The clock tower was restored in 1990.
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Monroe County was created on May 15, 1821 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1821 Extra. Session, p. 3). [Click here to read the legal description of Monroe County's original boundaries.] Dooly, Houston, Monroe, Fayette, and Henry County were created in that order by the Georgia Land Lottery Act of 1821, which was enacted at a special session of the General Assembly four months after the Creek Indians ceded lands between the Ocmulgee and Flint rivers (see map) on Jan. 8, 1821 in the first Treaty of Indian Springs. Monroe County was organized by an act of the legislature approved Dec. 24, 1821 (Ga. Laws 1821, p. 44).
Georgia's 50th county was named for James Monroe, who was President of the United States when the county was created.
Portions of Monroe County were used to create the following counties: Bibb and Pike (1822), Butt (1825), and Lamar (1920).
County Seat: The Dec. 24, 1821 act organizing Monroe County authorized the justices of the inferior court to select the location of the county seat (Ga. Laws 1821, p. 44). An act of Dec. 23, 1822 designated the inferior court as a commission to select a county seat, "which shall be as near the centre of the county as convenience will admit" (Ga. Laws 1822, p. 23). Initially, the legislation directed that Monroe County courts and elections be held at the house of Henry H. Lumkin. Subsequently, those inferior court chose lot 171 in the sixth district of Monroe County. Here, they purchased 202.5 acres from John Booth on Feb. 18, 1823, and directed that a town be laid out. The new county seat was named Forsyth, in honor of Georgia politician and diplomat John Forsyth (1780-1840) In an act of Dec. 10, 1823, the legislature confirmed this action by designating Forsyth permanent county seat and incorporating it as a town (Ga. Laws 1823, p. 198).
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map


Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 06:57 AM   #17
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Brooks County courthouse in Quitman



Location: Quitman
GPS Coordinates: 30.78526, 83.56003
Date Built: 1859-1864, extensively remodeled 1892
Architectural Style: Renaissance Revival/Romanesque Revival
Designer: John Wind (1859) and Bruce & Morgan (1892)
Other Information: In Jan. 1859, a month after the creation of Brooks County, the home of Thomas Folsom in Quitman was used as the county's first court room. Subsequently, a temporary courthouse was built. Later in 1859, work began on a permanent courthouse. With the outbreak of the Civil War, work preceded slowly, especially after the contractor died in 1862. The courthouse was not finished until 1864. In 1892, the courthouse underwent extensive renovation. [See postcard 1, postcard 2, and postcard 3 for photos of the courthouse in the early 1900s before the red brick building was painted white.]
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Brooks County was created by an act of the General Assembly approved on Dec. 11, 1858 (Ga. Laws 1858, p. 353). Created from portions of Lowndes and Thomas counties, Georgia's 131st county was named for South Carolina congressman Preston Brooks, an ardent supporter of states' rights.
County Seat: Quitman. The act creating Brooks County directed the judges of the inferior court to select a site within four miles of the center of the new county for erection of public buildings. The act further directed that the new county seat be named Quitman. The name honored Gen. John Quitman, former governor of Mississippi, American hero in the Mexican War, and Mississippi congressman at the time ofhis death in July 1858. Inferior court judges picked a site on the railroad connecting southwestern Georgia with Savannah. Quitman was incorporated by an act of the General Assembly approved Dec. 19, 1859.
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map


Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 07:09 AM   #18
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Jasper County courthouser in Monticello




Location: Monticello
Date Built:1907-08
Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival
Architect: T.F. Lockwood, Sr.

Other Information: The first "courthouse" in this county was actually the home of a citizen - John Towns - where public business was first done. The second courthouse was a log cabin built in 1809. In 1838, a three-story brick courthouse was built [see postcard]. This structure served until 1907, when construction began on the current courthouse. It is constructed of Georgia marble and brick, with four columns along the front and an eight-sided, domed clock tower. In the 1990s, the size of the courthouse was doubled when an extension was built to the rear of the buiding
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Originally named Randolph County, Jasper County was created from Baldwin County on Dec. 10, 1807 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). Georgia's 31st county was named for Virginia congressman John Randolph (1773-1833), whose political views were popular in Georgia. On Dec. 10, 1810, a legislative act renamed the county because of Randolph's opposition to the War of 1812 (though eventually he was forgiven and in 1828 would be recognized by having another new Georgia county named in his honor). On this day, the county became Jasper County in honor of Revolutionary War hero Sgt. William Jasper, who during the siege of Savannah was mortally wounded while retrieving his regiment's flag from the British. [See statute of Jasper].
In 1821, a portion of Jasper County was used to create Newton County.
County Seat: Monticello [named for Thomas Jefferson's Virginia home; created as county seat Dec. 10, 1808; and incorporated by the legislature on Dec. 15, 1810].
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map


Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 01:15 PM   #19
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 11,223
Thanks for the nice contribution Ernbo! So there is like only 146 left!
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 03:24 PM   #20
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Paulding County courthouses old and new in Dallas, Ga


Location: Dallas
Date Built:1892
Architectural Style: Queen Anne
Designer: Bruce & Morgan

Other Information: According to the 1832 legislation creating Paulding County, county elections and court sessions were to be held at the house of John Witcher until the county's inferior court should designate a county seat and provide for construction of a courthouse. At some point thereafter, a courthouse was built in the county seat of Van Wert -- but reportedly this structure later burned. Presumably, a second courthouse was built in Van Wert. Dallas became the new county seat in late Dec. 1851 or early 1852. Sometime between 1852 and 1855, Paulding County officials borrowed the money to build a new courthouse, as evidenced by an act of Feb. 16, 1856, authorizing the county to levy a special tax to pay off the courthouse debt (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 545). The present courthouse was built in 1892. (see early photo). The building was renovated 1956, 1984-85, and 1991. A new three-story, red brick courthouse annex was completed in 1990. In March 2001, the 1892 courthouse was the target of arson. Although the building survived, the district attorney's office was destroyed. As a result of the fire, Paulding County courts were forced to find meeting space outside the courthouse.
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Paulding County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to the 1832 act :
. . . so much of the first, second and third districts of the third section, as lies west of the line herein-before designated, and eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, twenty-first districts of the third section, and the first, second and seventeenth districts of the fourth section, shall form and become one county, to be called Paulding.
In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County.
Georgia's 89th county was named for John Paulding (1759-1818), who was a hero of the American Revolution. In 1780, Paulding assisted in the capture of Major John André, a British spy planning the seizure of West Point.
In 1851, part of Paulding County was used to help create Polk County. Also, between 1832 and 1874 -- but particularly during the 1850s -- portions of Paulding County were annexed to Bartow, Campbell, Carroll, Cobb, Douglas, Haralson, and Polk counties. Between 1850 and 1874, parts of Carroll, Cobb, Douglas, and Polk counties were annexed to Paulding County.
County Seat: The legislation creating Paulding County provided that on the first Monday in March 1833, election of county officials take place at the residence of John Witcher. Following that election, the new justices of county's inferior court were empowered to select a site for the county seat and provide for erection of a courthouse and other public buildings. The act further provided that until a courthouse was built, Paulding County superior and inferior courts were to hold sessions at John Witcher's house.
In 1833, the inferior court selected a site for the county seat -- but many citizens complained about the location. On Dec. 23, 1833, the legislature authorized the inferior court to call a referendum in Jan. 1834 to allow voters of Paulding County to indicate their choice for county seat (Ga. Laws 1833, p. 54). The referendum, however, was never held.
Presumably, the site designated as county seat in 1833 grew into a town that became known as Van Wert (named for Isaac Van Wert, who had assisted John Paulding in the capture of Major André in 1780.) On Dec. 27, 1838, the legislature designated Van Wert as permanent county seat and incorporated it as a town (Ga. Laws 1838, p. 75).
On Dec. 20, 1851, the legislature created Polk County from portions of Paulding and Floyd counties (Ga. Laws 1851-52, p. 52). Because Van Wert was located in the section of Paulding transferred to Polk, the legislation authorized the Paulding County inferior court to select a new county seat and provide for erection of a courthouse. On May 14, 1852, the inferior court accepted land deeded by Garrett Spinks for a new county seat and designated the site as Dallas. Incorporated by an act of Feb. 8, 1854 (Ga. Laws 1853-54, p. 232), Paulding County's seat was named for George Dallas (1792-1864), who was Vice President of the United States during the administration of James Polk (1845-49).

__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-11-2013 at 05:26 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 05:12 PM   #21
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 11,223
Damn dude, guess I should just kick back and wait until your done!

Something tells me this has been done before. We're not repeating ourselves here, are we?

Hey Ernie, if you get a chance, can you go grab the tag. It hasn't moved in a while.

jub jub screwed with this post 09-11-2013 at 05:18 PM
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 05:27 PM   #22
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jub jub View Post
Damn dude, guess I should just kick back and wait until your done!

Something tells me this has been done before. We're not repeating ourselves here, are we?

Hey Ernie, if you get a chance, can you go grab the tag. It hasn't moved in a while.
Challenge accepted.
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map


Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 05:54 PM   #23
jub jub OP
frumiousbandersnatch
 
jub jub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Location: Central, GA
Oddometer: 11,223
Thank you sir!
jub jub is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 08:26 AM   #24
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Bartow County courthouse in Cartersville



Location: Cartersville
Date Built:1902
Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival
Designer: Kenneth McDonald and J.W. Golucke

Other Information:At the time of Bartow County's creation in Dec. 1832, much of what originally was known as Cass County was occupied by Cherokee Indians, which delayed organizing the new county's government. In Dec. 1833, the legislature designated Cassville as county seat. What county officials initially used as a courthouse is not known, though at some point a courthouse was built. When Sherman's forces came through Bartow County in 1864, the courthouse and town were burned. In 1867, Bartow County voters approved a referendum to move the county seat to Cartersville. For six years, the county operated without a courthouse, but in 1873 a new courthouse was completed. Unfortunately, it was located so close to the railroad that court proceedings were interrupted when a train would pass through town. Still, the courthouse was used until a new one was built in 1902. [For early photos of the courthouse, see postcard 1 and postcard 2.] This courthouse is still in use, but the growth of Bartow County in recent decades led county officials to build the Frank Moore Administration and Judicial Center in 1992 (see photo). Frank Moore was sole commissioner of Bartow County from 1980 until his death in 1991. The complex that bears his name now serves as the principal courthouse for Bartow County -- though some court sessions continue to be held in the old courthouse.
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Bartow County, originally known as Cass County, was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to the 1832 act :
. . . such parts of the twenty-first, twenty-second and twenty-third districts of the second section as lie west of the line herein-before designated, and the fourth, fifth, sixth, fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth districts of the third section, shall form and become one county, to be called Cass.
In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County.
Portions of Cass County were used to created Gordon County in 1850 (Ga. Laws 1849-50, p. 124).
Georgia's 87th county originally was named for Pres. Andrew Jackson's Secretary of War, Gen. Lewis Cass of Michigan. Later, Cass's abolitionist and pro-Union views made him unpopular in Georgia. Following the death of Col. Francis Bartow in the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run), the General Assembly changed the name of Cass County to Bartow County on Dec. 6, 1861 (Ga. Laws 1861, p. 101).
County Seat: The 1832 act creating Cass County provided that the first justices of the inferior court were authorized to select a county seat and provide for erection of public buildings. What action the inferior court took is not known, but on Dec. 24, 1833, the General Assembly designated Cassville as county seat and incorporated the town (Ga. Laws 1833, p. 318). An act of Nov. 24, 1857 provided for a referendum in June 1858 to move the county seat from Cassville (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 256). If a majority of voters favored removal, a second referendum would be held in August 1858 allowing voters to indicate their choice for a new county seat.
Presumably, the 1858 referendum left Cassville as county seat. Six years later, Sherman's forces burned Cassville, leaving Bartow County without a seat of government. Court sessions were moved to Cartersville, which prompted another effort to designate a new county seat.
An act of Nov. 12, 1866 directed that a referendum be held on the first Monday in January 1867 on the location of Bartow's county seat (Ga. Laws 1866, p. 36). That act noted in its preamble: "Whereas, the county site of Bartow county was entirely destroyed by the Federal army; and whereas, the former citizens of said town have declined an attempt to rebuild it; and whereas, the people of said county are desirous of locating the site at some point on the Western & Atlantic Railroad . . . ." This time voters chose Cartersville as the new county seat. Cartersville had been incorporated by an act of Feb. 1, 1850 (Ga. Laws 1849-50, p. 103). The town was named for Farish Carter, one of Georgia's largest landowners before the Civil War and a frequent visitor to the settlement that would later bear his name.


__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 05:39 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 08:29 AM   #25
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
County Courthouses of Georgia Thread!

Dawson County courthouse in Dawsonville
Old:

Location: Dawsonville
Date Built: 2011

Architectural Style: Modern


Other Information: Dawson County's first courthouse was a two-story brick building [see photo] located in the town square of Dawsonville. That building served as courthouse until 1978, when a modern two-story courthouse was built a block north of the old courthouse. An even newer structure has recently replaced the old courthouse and jail.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Dawson County was created on Dec. 3, 1857 from Gilmer and Lumpkin counties by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 32). Georgia's 119th county was named in honor of noted lawyer, state legislator, soldier, U.S. Representative, and U.S. Senator William C. Dawson, who had died the previous year.
County Seat: The act creating Dawson County empowered the judges of the inferior court to select a site for location of the county seat. They selected a site and named it Dawsonville in honor of William C. Dawson.


New:
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 05:58 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 09:41 AM   #26
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Lumpkin County courthouse in Dahlonega
Historic courthouse


Location: Dahlonega
Date Built: 1836
Architectural Style: Modern
Designer:
Other Information: Lumpkin County's first courthouse was a log cabin at the gold rush town of Auraria. In 1836, the county built a two-story brick courthouse (see photos and story), which served until a new courthouse was built in 1965. Since that time, the former courthouse has served as the Dahlonega Gold Museum.
County History: Lumpkin County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to the 1832 act :
. . . so much of the said county of Cherokee as lies within the fourth, fifth, twelfth, thirteenth, fifteenth, and such parts of the sixth and eleventh districts of said first section, as lies south of the mountains, to be more particularly designated by a line hereafter to be run including such parts of the counties of Hall and Habersham herein-before added to said county of Cherokee, shall form and become one county, to be called Lumpkin.
In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County.
Georgia's 82nd county was named for Georgia governor Wilson Lumpkin, who held office at the time of the county's creation. Formerly U.S. representative, and later elected U.S. senator, Lumpkin was active in all three roles in seeking removal of Georgia's Cherokee Indians.
In 1857, part of Lumpkin County was used to help form Dawson County.
County Seat: Dahlonega [name derived from Cherokee phrase for "golden color"; incorporated as Talonega and designated county seat on Dec. 21, 1833; redesignated Dahlonega in 1835]
Previous county seat: Auraria [formerly named Nuckollsville and designated provisional county seat when Lumpkin County was created 1832].


__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 06:00 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 09:44 AM   #27
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
White County courthouse in Cleveland
Historic courthouse



The original White County courthouse was built in Cleveland in 1859. When the current courthouse was occupied in 1964, the old building was converted into a museum.
County History: White County was created from Habersham County on Dec. 22, 1857, by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1857, p. 44). Georgia's 125th county was named for Newton County state representative David T. White, who helped get legislation creating the county passed.
County Seat: Cleveland [named in honor of Maj. Benjamin Cleveland, a hero of the American Revolution's Battle of Kings Mountain who was an early settler of Habersham County]. Settled in 1857 and incorporated by the General Assembly on Aug. 18, 1870


__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 06:02 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 02:22 PM   #28
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
County Courthouses of Georgia Thread!

Union County historic courthouse in Blairsville



Location: Blairsville
Date Built: 1899
Architectural Style: Romanesque Revival
Designer: Golucke & Stewart
Other Information: After the previous courthouse was destroyed by fire, the above two-story courthouse with clock tower was built in 1899 in the town square using hand-fired bricks made locally (see early photo). Apparently, the brick were not fired for an adequete length of time and began to disintegrate gradually. Also, the courthouse was plagued continuously by a leaking roof, falling plaster, and decaying woodwork. By 1956, the courthouse clock tower was leaning noticeably (see photo), so in 1959 it was removed and the clock placed in storage. In 1971, the courthouse was condemned as unsafe -- but residents were successful in convincing the county's sole commissioner not to tear the historic building down. Thereafter, county court sessions were held in the local civic center, while other county officials continued in the old courthouse or moved to rented office space in several downtown buildings. Subsequently, a site two blocks away was purchased for construction of a new Union County Office Building. Rehabilitation of the old courthouse began in 1976, with the facility becoming headquarters of the Union County Historical Society. In 1985, rededication ceremonies for the old courthouse were held. Later, the courtroom on the second floor of the old courthouse was restored and occasionally is used today for court sessions. Fund raising began in the late 1990s for installation of a new clock tower with electronic clock and sound system for the old courthouse.Construction of the new clock tower was completed in November 2000.
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 06:03 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 02:24 PM   #29
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Fannin County courthouse in Blue Ridge

Old:

Location: Blue Ridge
Date Built: 2001-2004
Architectural Style:
Designer:

Other Information: The act creating Fannin County authorized the justices of the county's inferior court to select a county seat and provide for construction of a courthouse and other public buildings. Until such action was taken, the act directed that county business and elections take place at Joab Addington's Store. Fannin County's first courthouse, a small wooden structure, was built in Morgantown. Little is known about when, except that it reportedly burned down. In 1895, the county seat was moved to the town of Blue Ridge, where a two-story brick courthouse was built in 1895-96 (see photo 1 and photo 2). The courthouse burned in 1936, and a new courthouse was completed the following year funded by the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works (see photo).
In 2000, Fannin County voters approved a special-purpose local option sales tax to finance construction of a new courthouse and jail complex next door to the 1937 courthouse. An architect was selected in November 2000, with construction beginning the following year. Construction of the new courthouse was completed and the new building occupired in the spring of 2004. In July 2004, theBlue Ridge Mountain Arts Association began leasing the old courthouse, which was renamed The Georgia Mountain Center for the Arts.
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History: Fannin County was created from Gilmer and Union counties on Jan. 21, 1854 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1853-54, p. 298). That legislation specified Fannin County's boundaries as:
Beginning at the North-west corner of Lot No. 163, 27th District, 2d Section, thence South to the South-west corner of Lot No. 180, 27th District, 2d Section, thence East to Lot No. 9 in the 7th District and 2d Section, thence on a straight line to the South-east corner of the 7th District and 2d Section, thence South with the district line to Lot No. 9 in the 6th District and 1st Section, thence North-east with the Blue Ridge to Lot No. 228, thence in a straight line to William Cavender's in the county of Union, thence due North to the top of the Ridge dividing the waters of Tacoah and Notley rivers, thence along the top of the said dividing Ridge North west to the head of Dooly Creek, thence in a North direction along the top of the main ridge to the North Carolina line at or near Jesse Raper's, thence along the North Carolina line to the line dividing Tennessee and Georgia, thence along said line to the starting point. [Note: Instead of lot 228, as noted above, the 1854 act specified lot "162 on the district line between 5th and 6th of the 1st Section at the Lumpkin line." However, in 1891, the legislature replaced this quoted language with "228" stating that reference to lot 162 in the 1854 act had been a "clerical error" (Ga. Laws 1890-91, p. 240).]
Georgia's 107th county was named for Col. James Fannin (1804-1836), a Georgian who fought in the War for Texas Independence and was killed at Goliad.
County Seat: The legislation creating Fannin County directed the justices of the county's inferior court to select the location of the county seat, with the only stipulation that the site be as near the center of the county as practicable. Until a county seat was designated and a courthouse built, the act directed that county business and elections take place at Joab Addington's Store. Subsequently, the inferior court designated Morganton as county seat. Reportedly, James Morris, an early settler, named Morganton after his previous hometown of Morganton, North Carolina. On March 5, 1856, the General Assembly incorporated Morganton (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 353). In June 1895, two-fifths of the voters of Fannin County signed a petition to change the county seat to the town of Blue Ridge. On Aug. 13, 1895, a referendum was held in which over two-thirds of the voters approved removal of the county seat. Based on that election, the General Assembly enacted legislation on Dec. 13, 1895, changing the county seat from Morganton to Blue Ridge (Ga. Laws 1895, p. 420). Blue Ridge, named for the Blue Ridge Mountains, had been incorporated by the legislature by an act of Oct. 24, 1887 (Ga. Laws 1887, p. 647).

New:
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 06:05 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2013, 02:40 PM   #30
Mr&MrsErnbo
Taggin' Machines
 
Mr&MrsErnbo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Location: Outside Hotlanta and the Sandbox
Oddometer: 1,312
Gilmer County courthouse in Ellijay


Location: Ellijay
Date Built:2007-08
Architectural Style:
Designer:

Other Information: The Dec. 1832 act creating Gilmer County provided that "the place where Ned Tucker recently lived" would serve as the county's initial courthouse and place for holding elections. The law also authorized an election of county officials in March 1833 and provided that the first justices of inferior court select the county seat of Gilmer County and provide for erection of a courthouse and other county buildings. That year, the inferior court chose Ellijay as county seat and had a wooden courthouse built here. In 1854, a new courthouse was built, which would serve the county for the next 80 years.
In 1898, the Hyatt Hotel was constructed facing the downtown square in Ellijay. The two-story brick building was converted for use as the Gilmer County courthouse in 1934 (see photo). Later, a private brick home across the street from the courthouse was purchased and converted into a courthouse annex and home for the Gilmer County Commission (see photo).
In March 2003, the county fire marshall condemned the Gilmer County courthouse because of extensive code violatiions. The building was closed on March 27, forcing the county to find alternative facilities for courts and county officials who had been housed in the courthouse.
County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here
County History:Gilmer County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to that act:
. . . the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth and such parts of the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth districts as lie east of a line commencing at the centre of the south line of the twenty-fourth, and running due north to the north line of the twenty-fifth, and so much of the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh districts of said second section, as lies east of a range of mountains running north and south through said district, shall form and become one county, to be called Gilmer.
In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County. Cherokee lands were distributed to whites in a land lottery, but the legislature temporarily prohibited whites from taking possession of lots on which Cherokees still lived. By 1833, however, whites began occupying areas of Gilmer County.
Georgia's 85th county was named for George R. Gilmer, who served two terms as Georgia governor (1829-1831, 1837-1839), as state legislator, and as U.S. congressman. Gilmer -- a strong proponent of state sovereignty over Cherokee lands in Georgia -- was governor at the time of the Cherokee's forced removal to the west.
As originally constituted, Gilmer County extended to the Tennessee border (see map). Later created in part or whole from its original boundaries were Pickens, Fannin, and Dawson counties.
County Seat:The Dec. 1832 act creating Gilmer County authorized election of county officials in March 1833 and provided that the first justices of inferior court select a location to serve as county seat. Subsequently, the inferior court chose Ellijay as county seat. On Dec. 20, 1834, the state legislature designated Ellijay as permanent county seat of Gilmer County. That legislation also named town commissioners for Ellijay and gave them the "power and authority to make all such by-laws for the government and good order of the said town of Ellijay as may be necessary . . . ." In effect, the Dec. 20, 1834 act incorporated Ellijay as an official town, although not using the terms "incorporate" or "incorporation." On Dec. 19, 1840, the legislature passed new legislation for Ellijay, this time specifically incorporating the town.
Ellijay originally was a Cherokee town named Ellija, a name believed to have been a Cherokee reference to a green place -- perhaps because the town was settled on a river. The town was located on the Ellijay Road, which branched off the Cherokee Federal Road just west of Talking Rock and traveled northeastward into North Carolina. By 1833, whites had settled the site of Ellija, calling it Ellijay.
__________________
Where shall we ride today??
Iron Butt Association No. 48951
Coastal Empire TOR Map



Mr&MrsErnbo screwed with this post 09-12-2013 at 06:07 PM
Mr&MrsErnbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014