ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-09-2013, 08:19 AM   #46
Colorado Col Rider
Wee Stromming Now
 
Colorado Col Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 195
Cool2

Quote:
Originally Posted by ibafran View Post
ALL: They don't take bikes to the skid pad for G numbers like they generate for the cages. Recently, Cycle World posted something like 0.82g for the BMW 1600. The Can-Am Spyder generates 0.53g before the electronic safety crap kicks in and stops the fun before it can get started. In the distant past, Cycle World has timed a very good rider on a stretch of secret road (Mexico?) against what was described as a cage enthusiast with mediocre skills. It was noted that there was a lot of wind blown sand in the corners on the test roadway. Results posted in the mag were that it took one very skilled rider to go fast and deal with the sand without crashing to barely beat the cager. It was noted that the cager has a much easier time 'recovering' from small driving errors with less consequence for errors than the bike (duh, added by me). Whereas, the biker very much needs to be skilled at the edge of traction while knowing that dropping the bike means loss of contest.

From the above scenario, we can conclude that most cagers do not care to run at higher g-loads as it spills their coffees and makes for an uncomfortable ride what with complaints from passengers and barfing little kids. So it doesn't surprise me that the occasional solo cager might easily take an x-way ramp at a safe for a cage high g-load and stay out in front of a very good bike which is approaching its limits while being ridden by someone who is not on his game at the moment for a long list of reasons.

Before the performance jockeys go nuts with this post and start telling me that the bike line on a ramp is much faster than a cage line, etc and that the bike should be faster, on and on; I remind them that the OP notes that he is sharing the ramp with the cage. Rolling on the bike's power for an easy pass on the ramp's exit line is do-able only if the rider wants to risk sharing a lane with an unknown cager who may merge early or do something unexpected in a risky place. So bikes are usually somewhat faster than the cages in most conditions due to other reasons but not because bikes pull better Gees by design. Most piss-poor cages can pull better g than most hot bikes on sticky DOT rubber. Good luck trying to stay with a Vette pulling 0.90g out 1.0g possible on a ramp. The Vette's tires won't even be moaning.

And let us remember that itty-bitty, 2 seater sports cages of old used to come with very good bucket seats to allow for more comfortable support during high lateral g. And the cagers of old used to put good after-market driving seats in cages all the time when they wanted to have fun behind the wheel. As bikers, we should count our blessings that the cagers by and large do not have good lateral support. That kind of seating support would only encourage the cagers to drive poorly at a higher speed. Fortunately, most cagers do not know how to use their belts to get more lateral support. So, they rermain slow enough that it is still easy for bikers to deal with them.

Thinking how I do, I am not embarassed that the occasional cager gets around a ramp better than me. And when it happens, I am grateful that the cager was moving fast enough to stay out of my way while I enjoyed my lean angle as I can on the day.

And to the clowns who have nothing better to do than complain about enthusiastic forum users' english skills, fyyff; get some perspective. ibafran-not putting up with the usual forum crap today for who knows what reasons?
Sweet Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by drclaypool
I found the most popular, beautiful canyon run in Colorado last summer on my old Tiger. Ended up behind a Lotus Elise who's driver appreciated the curves as much as I. I was dragging pegs trying to keep up with him. Had to back off before I screwed up and landed in the river, which leads me to believe hot cars can outcorner most bikes, hands down. I got schooled. And I always thought otherwise. Now somebody confirm that skis out-corner snowboards.
Not alone, I got worked by a BMW M3 on Loveland pass yesterday morning. I barely caught up in the straights on the Keystone side. Oh and I can confirm skiers are faster and can boost higher than snowboarders in a pipe. Been living in breck for 15 years, I'm an aggressive snowboarder, my aggressive skier friends can always bomb a little faster if they have the balls. Edges man.
__________________
Sitting on top of a mountain
Colorado Col Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 02:50 AM   #47
Ray of Sunshine OP
Meat Donut 2 Some
 
Ray of Sunshine's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: 42deg 40' 3"N 73deg 46' 54"W
Oddometer: 16,840
Ahem, OP is a girl...
__________________
For the love of Baldy, would someone please buy my bikes?

Life is better, but why not?
Ray of Sunshine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 02:56 AM   #48
Ray of Sunshine OP
Meat Donut 2 Some
 
Ray of Sunshine's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: 42deg 40' 3"N 73deg 46' 54"W
Oddometer: 16,840
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibafran View Post
ALL: They don't take bikes to the skid pad for G numbers like they generate for the cages. Recently, Cycle World posted something like 0.82g for the BMW 1600. The Can-Am Spyder generates 0.53g before the electronic safety crap kicks in and stops the fun before it can get started. In the distant past, Cycle World has timed a very good rider on a stretch of secret road (Mexico?) against what was described as a cage enthusiast with mediocre skills. It was noted that there was a lot of wind blown sand in the corners on the test roadway. Results posted in the mag were that it took one very skilled rider to go fast and deal with the sand without crashing to barely beat the cager. It was noted that the cager has a much easier time 'recovering' from small driving errors with less consequence for errors than the bike (duh, added by me). Whereas, the biker very much needs to be skilled at the edge of traction while knowing that dropping the bike means loss of contest.

From the above scenario, we can conclude that most cagers do not care to run at higher g-loads as it spills their coffees and makes for an uncomfortable ride what with complaints from passengers and barfing little kids. So it doesn't surprise me that the occasional solo cager might easily take an x-way ramp at a safe for a cage high g-load and stay out in front of a very good bike which is approaching its limits while being ridden by someone who is not on his game at the moment for a long list of reasons.

Before the performance jockeys go nuts with this post and start telling me that the bike line on a ramp is much faster than a cage line, etc and that the bike should be faster, on and on; I remind them that the OP notes that SHE is sharing the ramp with the cage. Rolling on the bike's power for an easy pass on the ramp's exit line is do-able only if the rider wants to risk sharing a lane with an unknown cager who may merge early or do something unexpected in a risky place. So bikes are usually somewhat faster than the cages in most conditions due to other reasons but not because bikes pull better Gees by design. Most piss-poor cages can pull better g than most hot bikes on sticky DOT rubber. Good luck trying to stay with a Vette pulling 0.90g out 1.0g possible on a ramp. The Vette's tires won't even be moaning.

And let us remember that itty-bitty, 2 seater sports cages of old used to come with very good bucket seats to allow for more comfortable support during high lateral g. And the cagers of old used to put good after-market driving seats in cages all the time when they wanted to have fun behind the wheel. As bikers, we should count our blessings that the cagers by and large do not have good lateral support. That kind of seating support would only encourage the cagers to drive poorly at a higher speed. Fortunately, most cagers do not know how to use their belts to get more lateral support. So, they rermain slow enough that it is still easy for bikers to deal with them.

Thinking how I do, I am not embarassed that the occasional cager gets around a ramp better than me. And when it happens, I am grateful that the cager was moving fast enough to stay out of my way while I enjoyed my lean angle as I can on the day.

And to the clowns who have nothing better to do than complain about enthusiastic forum users' english skills, fyyff; get some perspective. ibafran-not putting up with the usual forum crap today for who knows what reasons?
:facepalm
__________________
For the love of Baldy, would someone please buy my bikes?

Life is better, but why not?
Ray of Sunshine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 02:58 AM   #49
henshao
Bained
 
henshao's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2013
Location: The Commonwealth
Oddometer: 233
I can definitely entry most turns way hotter in my Firebird than on my Buell, I sometimes rely on understeer scrubbing off excess speed. Front wheel skid is about the last thing you want on a bike though!

Of course, on my bike I can always take a much straighter line, but with my car it's just so much easier and more forgiving. No hanging off, countersteering, watching for sand/oil/wet leaves/cardboard/ sandy cardboard on a pile of oily leaves. One time taking an on ramp at twice the posted speed I hit a fucking SANDBAR in mid turn. Calmly applying maximum antilock brakes while continuing to turn, nothing (much) happened. On my bike I could have been out of gas and walking and still would have dropped it
henshao is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 09:13 AM   #50
Colorado Col Rider
Wee Stromming Now
 
Colorado Col Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Rocky Mountains
Oddometer: 195
Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray of Sunshine View Post
Ahem, OP is a girl...
What's that got to do with it

Edit: Oh I see what's happening here...#latetoparty, #needmorecoffee
__________________
Sitting on top of a mountain
Colorado Col Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 06:23 PM   #51
tokyoklahoma
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2011
Location: N.W. Arkansas
Oddometer: 1,166
slang

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorzok View Post

i'm still trying to figure out what "ten pennied" was supposed to mean.
Any progress?
__________________
You can call me TKO
tokyoklahoma is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 09:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014