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Old 08-20-2013, 09:35 AM   #91
SxyRdr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tennyis View Post
trip was amazing! did 850km (little over 500 miles) and had a lot of good times and sight seeing. Already thinking of Lake Placid trip next month :)

The bike is a bit on the cramped side for me though, I think a V-Strom will be in my driveway next year. Possibly a KLR but the V-Strom just seems like its worth the extra money.
Glad you had a great trip.


FWIW, my son had a KLR650 and recently acquired a V-Strom 650. He liked the KLR... he LOVES the Wee.
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Old 09-25-2013, 09:20 PM   #92
tennyis OP
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Thanks wound up buying one now, good deal came along so I figured why wait until spring :)

I am the proud new owner of a 2004 dl650 v-strom!
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Old 09-25-2013, 10:31 PM   #93
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Originally Posted by tennyis View Post
Thanks wound up buying one now, good deal came along so I figured why wait until spring :)

I am the proud new owner of a 2004 dl650 v-strom!

sweet, congrats! this is good. more comfort and capability with plenty of room to grow. I'm thinking there is some riding in your future for sure. today just hopped back on my bike for the first time in a few weeks... had broke my foot and doctor was making a big issue out of not riding the bike. (ok so I snuck a couple short rides in just don't tell the doc) I have a clear go now and am back on and thinking I need to get a couple more miles out... perhaps a long weekend trip to Colorado is in order.

edit: yet another nice aspect of this is the mpg... even at $4 a gallon you can ride without feeling too guilty about it. I think your vstrom must get in the high 50's at least.

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Old 09-26-2013, 04:12 PM   #94
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Congrats on the V-Strom.

The day you feel totally comfortable on a motorcyle and have no fear is the day you need to sell it.
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Old 09-26-2013, 05:31 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by Newby1 View Post
The day you feel totally comfortable on a motorcyle and have no fear is the day you need to sell it.
If I had to ride every day scared and uncomfortable, I wouldn't be riding. You're just projecting your own feelings onto other people.

There's a way around all that. It's known as "proficiency".
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Old 09-26-2013, 05:45 PM   #96
Red9
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Wow...

I can't believe some of the people here advocating not to ride until you have taken "the course."

Makes me wonder how us old folks survived! Believe it or not junior, many of us here took up motorcycling long before there were any courses to take.

Throw a leg over the damn thing and go on out into the country and ride.
Don't head out into heavy traffic or down any super twisty roads but dammit man, ride! Even if it's in an empty parking lot or up and down an empty street.
Learn how to operate and get a feel for the controls, the brakes and throttle. How to balance at a stop etc.

And don't listen to the pussies who didn't throw a leg over until somebody ran alongside and held their hand. They'll tell you you're going to learn bad habits and blah blah blah....

I strongly recommend you do take a riding course but did you take a course to learn how to ride your first bicycle?
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Old 09-26-2013, 06:12 PM   #97
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i've been riding for almost 10 years, have done track days, track schools, race schools, BRC, ARC (in that order), and still do not always feel 100% confident on the bike. i'll still occasionally lock-up when something unexpected happens, although with what i've learned i can recover a lot faster than i used to be able to. at first i would lock-up, target fixate and sometimes crash, whereas now the training usually will kick in and i can fix the problem, then sort of shake my head at making a newbie mistake when i get in a little over my head.

one thing that i have found is that my feel for a bike is very tire pressure sensitive. a change of 3 or 4 psi seems to have a huge impact on my confidence on a bike. too low and i can feel the bike sort of hunting for a line and not taking a set mid corner, while too high and the bike seems to flop over on entry which kind of ruins the rest of the corner for me.


to be honest, the BRC was probably the least helpful training i've received due to the slow speeds and dogmatic teaching. conversely, the ARC was the most revealing in terms of what a rider can "get away with" in terms of control inputs to the bike.

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Old 09-26-2013, 06:20 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red9 View Post
Throw a leg over the damn thing and go on out into the country and ride.
Don't head out into heavy traffic or down any super twisty roads but dammit man, ride! Even if it's in an empty parking lot or up and down an empty street.
Learn how to operate and get a feel for the controls, the brakes and throttle. How to balance at a stop etc.
...
i have advocated this method in the past, and this is how i learned. however, a buddy of mine recently lost his spleen and a kidney because he followed my advice on how to learn. he rode for an hour or so in a parking lot getting used to the feel of his new to him monster 750, then rode to the gas station to fill the tank. upon exiting the gas station he managed to completely lose control of the bike and ram in to a concrete wall.

i am no longer sure that the 'throw a leg over and ride' method is a good one. maybe it depends on the person.
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Old 09-26-2013, 06:25 PM   #99
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Originally Posted by marty_uiuc View Post
he rode for an hour or so in a parking lot getting used to the feel of his new to him monster 750

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Old 09-26-2013, 06:37 PM   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red9 View Post
Wow...

I can't believe some of the people here advocating not to ride until you have taken "the course."

Makes me wonder how us old folks survived! Believe it or not junior, many of us here took up motorcycling long before there were any courses to take.

Throw a leg over the damn thing and go on out into the country and ride.
Don't head out into heavy traffic or down any super twisty roads but dammit man, ride! Even if it's in an empty parking lot or up and down an empty street.
Learn how to operate and get a feel for the controls, the brakes and throttle. How to balance at a stop etc.

And don't listen to the pussies who didn't throw a leg over until somebody ran alongside and held their hand. They'll tell you you're going to learn bad habits and blah blah blah....

I strongly recommend you do take a riding course but did you take a course to learn how to ride your first bicycle?
Yup, taught myself, back in the mid 1950s. Started with Cushman scooters because we had a scooter law that allowed 14 yo kids to operate anything 5 hp or less. Back then, kids got out of the house and DID things, because there was no Internet and daytime TV sucked. There was one phone in the back hall, and we were on a party line. I rode a bicycle to school year round and it was my main transport. Times were different, and most of the guys could ride and drive by the time they got a license.
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Old 09-26-2013, 08:13 PM   #101
joexr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marty_uiuc View Post
i've been riding for almost 10 years, have done track days, track schools, race schools, BRC, ARC (in that order), and still do not always feel 100% confident on the bike. i'll still occasionally lock-up when something unexpected happens, although with what i've learned i can recover a lot faster than i used to be able to. at first i would lock-up, target fixate and sometimes crash, whereas now the training usually will kick in and i can fix the problem, then sort of shake my head at making a newbie mistake when i get in a little over my head.

one thing that i have found is that my feel for a bike is very tire pressure sensitive. a change of 3 or 4 psi seems to have a huge impact on my confidence on a bike. too low and i can feel the bike sort of hunting for a line and not taking a set mid corner, while too high and the bike seems to flop over on entry which kind of ruins the rest of the corner for me.


to be honest, the BRC was probably the least helpful training i've received due to the slow speeds and dogmatic teaching. conversely, the ARC was the most revealing in terms of what a rider can "get away with" in terms of control inputs to the bike.
Quote:
Originally Posted by marty_uiuc View Post
i have advocated this method in the past, and this is how i learned. however, a buddy of mine recently lost his spleen and a kidney because he followed my advice on how to learn. he rode for an hour or so in a parking lot getting used to the feel of his new to him monster 750, then rode to the gas station to fill the tank. upon exiting the gas station he managed to completely lose control of the bike and ram in to a concrete wall.

i am no longer sure that the 'throw a leg over and ride' method is a good one. maybe it depends on the person.
You were both too old already when you started.
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Old 09-27-2013, 04:30 PM   #102
txwanderer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red9 View Post
Wow...

I can't believe some of the people here advocating not to ride until you have taken "the course."

Makes me wonder how us old folks survived! Believe it or not junior, many of us here took up motorcycling long before there were any courses to take.

Throw a leg over the damn thing and go on out into the country and ride.
Don't head out into heavy traffic or down any super twisty roads but dammit man, ride! Even if it's in an empty parking lot or up and down an empty street.
Learn how to operate and get a feel for the controls, the brakes and throttle. How to balance at a stop etc.

And don't listen to the pussies who didn't throw a leg over until somebody ran alongside and held their hand. They'll tell you you're going to learn bad habits and blah blah blah....

I strongly recommend you do take a riding course but did you take a course to learn how to ride your first bicycle?
Back in "the day" there weren't the dangers on the road there are now. Bikes didn't go and stop like modern ones either. Plenty has changed. I took my first course 20 odd years after learning to ride from my dad, uncle and grand father. All had been life long bikers. Not riders, bikers. They were all concerned about my interest until they figured out the kind of riding I fell in love with. What could a "course" possibly teach me they couldn't? Answer? PLENTY
I took it so a friend who had never ridden would have someone he knew in the class. I'm not sure I didn't get more out of it than he did. Lots of bad habits to break and a mound of info I didn't know. Never even thought about.
Too many teach, or try to teach a buddy to ride and it ends in disaster. Professional instruction isn't always the end all, but it is a good start. Are you one who think slow speed parking lot drills don't help in the so called "Real World" too. This faulted thought can't be farther from the truth.
I had a great instructor, so all aren't created equal, but it is time and money well spent, just go in open minded and ready for criticism. If you can handle it, the course is great. The ARC is even better, IMHO.

YMMV
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:18 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by txwanderer View Post
Back in "the day" there weren't the dangers on the road there are now. Bikes didn't go and stop like modern ones either. Plenty has changed. I took my first course 20 odd years after learning to ride from my dad, uncle and grand father. All had been life long bikers. Not riders, bikers. They were all concerned about my interest until they figured out the kind of riding I fell in love with. What could a "course" possibly teach me they couldn't? Answer? PLENTY
I took it so a friend who had never ridden would have someone he knew in the class. I'm not sure I didn't get more out of it than he did. Lots of bad habits to break and a mound of info I didn't know. Never even thought about.
Too many teach, or try to teach a buddy to ride and it ends in disaster. Professional instruction isn't always the end all, but it is a good start. Are you one who think slow speed parking lot drills don't help in the so called "Real World" too. This faulted thought can't be farther from the truth.
I had a great instructor, so all aren't created equal, but it is time and money well spent, just go in open minded and ready for criticism. If you can handle it, the course is great. The ARC is even better, IMHO.

YMMV
If you go back and read my post I suggested drills in an empty parking lot and to take the course.

As to dangers on the road back in the day....

My first bike was a 2 stroke with a power band about 2 seconds long, a front wheel that wouldn't stay down and brakes that provided as much stopping power as riding across a strip of flypaper. There were a lot less of us on the roads and less cars too, which also meant people were'nt near as aware that we even existed. Add to that wheels that were just a tad wider than most mountain bikes.

You can say any age or time was more or less dangerous...

But you'll never convince anyone near my age or older that a general pussification of the population hasn't occurred since.

We've all got stories of a person getting hurt trying something new.
Soon some people will be suggesting "why not go all the way and nobody fucking move!"

Get on the damn thing and ride or start taking estrogen.
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Old 09-27-2013, 08:37 PM   #104
txwanderer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red9 View Post
If you go back and read my post I suggested drills in an empty parking lot and to take the course.

As to dangers on the road back in the day....

My first bike was a 2 stroke with a power band about 2 seconds long, a front wheel that wouldn't stay down and brakes that provided as much stopping power as riding across a strip of flypaper. There were a lot less of us on the roads and less cars too, which also meant people were'nt near as aware that we even existed. Add to that wheels that were just a tad wider than most mountain bikes.

You can say any age or time was more or less dangerous...

But you'll never convince anyone near my age or older that a general pussification of the population hasn't occurred since.

We've all got stories of a person getting hurt trying something new.
Soon some people will be suggesting "why not go all the way and nobody fucking move!"

Get on the damn thing and ride or start taking estrogen.
LMAO, I'll bet you are a hoot at parties. Yes, you said take the course after a full out assault on anyone who thought there might be a better way. "Just throw a leg over and ride" is not always a good idea. We all have had our lumps. Learning wrong is still learning and still wrong. Chances are it will bite you sooner or later.
I don't care if you managed to survive for 75 years doing it "your" way. Probably no one else does either.
That doesn't mean you are wrong, there have just been better ways of doing thing found out during that time.
Some of us check out new ideas, and find out they are pretty good.
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Old 09-28-2013, 09:56 AM   #105
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Originally Posted by txwanderer View Post
LMAO, I'll bet you are a hoot at parties. Yes, you said take the course after a full out assault on anyone who thought there might be a better way. "Just throw a leg over and ride" is not always a good idea. We all have had our lumps. Learning wrong is still learning and still wrong. Chances are it will bite you sooner or later.
I don't care if you managed to survive for 75 years doing it "your" way. Probably no one else does either.
That doesn't mean you are wrong, there have just been better ways of doing thing found out during that time.
Some of us check out new ideas, and find out they are pretty good.
They are only new ideas to people that have no idea.
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