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Old 09-30-2013, 05:24 PM   #91
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No Duplicates

I missed marking Gilmer on my list....i am using a hi tech paper map with a highlighter..... i'm sure there is a better way!

I better get on the move.... the group is one up on me.
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Old 09-30-2013, 07:42 PM   #92
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I missed marking Gilmer on my list....i am using a hi tech paper map with a highlighter..... i'm sure there is a better way!

I better get on the move.... the group is one up on me.
I''m going to print out a map and do the same. It's getting to big to go by memory now. Do you think you can grab the other 98 by Saturday? :
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Old 10-01-2013, 04:33 AM   #93
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maybe..... not.

I'll be trying for a few more. Not sure of my route yet.
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Old 10-01-2013, 06:25 AM   #94
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I'll be trying for a few more. Not sure of my route yet.
Just so we don't duplicate our efforts, I'm planning on grabbing Bleckly, Laurens, Dodge, Wheeler and Telfair this weekend.
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Old 10-01-2013, 07:01 AM   #95
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That's the direction I was planning on heading. I can go farther south. Maybe worth, colquitt, cook, tift, Irwin and ben hill. might add a couple of others!



Yellow by me...blue by others.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:33 AM   #96
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That's the direction I was planning on heading. I can go farther south. Maybe worth, colquitt, cook, tift, Irwin and ben hill. might add a couple of others!



Yellow by me...blue by others.

sent from my droid maxx with tapatalk...
Travis

Travis, you might be able to grab the ones I was going to do. It seems the wife wants to go to the gun range Saturday and shoot off a few rounds. She mentioned something about buying me a hand gun of my choice if I go with her. We'll see. I'll give you a definitive answer by Friday. If you get the ones I wanted to get, then I'll probably head down towards Waycross on Sunday (weather permitting) and try to fill in the southeast somewhat.
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:35 PM   #97
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I've got a 387 mile route planned to the south. Hmmmm a new gun or a ride.... Decisions, decisions.......
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Old 10-05-2013, 04:51 PM   #98
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Worth County Courthouse, Slyvester GA and 10 more....

Came out to 425 miles miles today. Started off with very heavy ground fog and smelling of recently dug peanuts.







Location: Sylvester

GPS Coordinates: 31.52794, 83.83590

Date Built: 1905 (substantially rebuilt after 1982 fire)

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: J.W. Golucke




There have been four courthouses since Worth County was created in 1853. The first courthouse was a two-story frame structure on the public square in Isabella, which was then Worth's county seat. This building burned down in 1879, and a schoolhouse was used as a temporary courthouse until a new courthouse could be built in 1893 -- but that structure soon burned also. A new courthouse was constructed the following year, but in 1904 the legislature changed the county seat from Isabella to Sylvester. The next year, a new courthouse was built on Sylvester's public square. In January 1982, the Worth County courthouse suffered major fire damage, requiring substantial rebuilding.

he legislation creating Worth County named the small settlement of San Bernard [named for Saint Bernard of Clairvaux] as temporary seat of government. The act empowered the justices of the new county's inferior court to pick any site they saw proper for a permanent county seat, and in 1854, tthey chose a site a mile to the east of San Bernard. The new settlement was amed Isabella [named for the wife. of Gen. Worth]. In 1872, a railroad built to connect Albany with Brunswick, missed Isabella by three miles to the south. Though a rail stop known as Isabella Station was built on the railroad, the county seat suffered by not being directly served by the railroad. Soon, other communities sprang up along the railroad in Worth County. By 1893, the small community of Isabella Station was known as Sylvester [the origin of the name refers to forests, though why it was chosen is unknown (though it may have been associated with one of the first settlers of the community)]. On Dec. 21, 1898, Sylvester was incorporated. By the early 1900s, Sylvester residents had launched a move to have their city designated as Worth's county seat. In 1904, a county-wide election was held and the vote favored the move. On July 1, 1904, the General Assembly formally designated Sylvester as the new seat of government for Worth County.
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Old 10-05-2013, 04:57 PM   #99
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Colquitt County, Moultrie GA







Location: Moultrie

GPS Coordinates of Courthouse Main Entrance: 31.17940, 83.78851

Date Built: 1902

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Andrew J. Bryan & Co.

At the time of Colquitt County's creation on February 25, 1856, there were no incorporated towns in the new county. Initially, superior court sessions were held in a large one-story wooden house built by George Tucker on Land Lot 196 in the Eighth Land District (see photo). Known as "Mim's House," the temporary courthouse was located four miles northwest of the small settlement of Ochlockoney. Shortly afterwards, the justices of the new inferior court desginated Ochlockoney as county seat. At some point between 1856 and 1859, the court authorized construction of a "sizeable log building" to serve as Colquitt County's first real courthouse. In 1859, the General Assembly incorporated the settlement at Ochlockoney and named it Moultrie. The legislation designated that the new city consist of the fifty acres surrounding the courthouse. Unfortunately, the log courthouse burned in the spring of 1881, with all land deeds and other county records destroyed. Thereafter, litigation continued for years over land ownership and boundaries in Colquitt County.

According to a local newspaper account, "Shortly after the fire a one-story, box-like building was erected of unfinished timbers, with the boards running up and down-and covered with strips of lumber to keep out the cold and wind." After a few years, the building was sold to local Methodists for use as a church. The building was removed and in its place a new two-story wooden courthouse constructed. Rectangular in shape, a wing was later added, creating an "L" shaped structure.

During the 1890s, Colquitt County's population almost tripled due to the rapid growth of timber and naval stores industries. By 1898, county officials were calling for a larger courthouse. They were also fearful of another courthouse fire. So, in 1901, officials decided to build a larger and safer structure. The courthouse was dismantled and sold to a local resident.

Bids for construction of new two-story brick courthous were opened on April 6, 1901, and the project was awarded to J.H. Harris for his bid of $19,250. Construction of the new courthouse was completed in August 1902, with county officials moving in on September 1.

In 1938, the federal Work Project Administration proposed modernizing the 1902 courthouse, including adding four more stories (with the top floor to serve as the jail). The WPA would pay 45 percent of the cost, with Colquitt County responsible for the remainder. County commissioners were tempted to accept the offer, but in the end declined because the county was alredy in debt because of the Depression. As a result, the Work Project Administration undertook a less ambitious courthouse restoration in 1940.

In 1952, county officials had the courthouse's tan brick exterior painted white. Four years later, in conjunction with Colquitt County's centennial, county commissioners authorized a complete remodeling and modernization of the courthouse in 1956-57 at a cost of $285,000. Using convict labor, the interior of the building was stripped to the first floor, and a new second and third floor created--with 12-foot ceilings instead of the former height of 20 feet. The original windows were bricked up, and new smaller windows installed for each floor. Also, some of the distinctive architectural features of the 1902 building were removed.

In 1994, residents of Colquitt County approved a one cent local option sales tax to renovate the courthouse. In 1998, a major rehabilitation of the courthouse was begun. Completed in March 2001, the $1,889,000 project replaced many of the features of the 1902 courthouse removed in the 1950s though not restoring the interior to two main floors. Unfortunately, some of the wood used in the 1998-2001 rehabilitation soon began to rot, requiring further rehabilitation in 2005.

And a very nice eternal flame memorial to the fallen....

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Old 10-05-2013, 05:07 PM   #100
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Thomas County Courthouse, Thomasville, GA






Location: Thomasville

GPS Coordinates: 30.83881, 83.98177

Date Built: 1858, remodeled 1888

Architectural Style: Greek Revival (1858), Classical/Victorian elements added 1888

Designer: John Wind (1858), unknown (1888 remodeling)




The legislation creating Thomas County provided that superior and inferior courts initially would be held in the house of Charles Kingsley. Reportedly, a log cabin was subsequently built in Thomasville to serve as the county's first courthouse. This simple structure was followed by a larger courthouse, presumably built of wood. The present courthouse -- a three-story brick building -- was originally constructed in 1858. It underwent a major remodeling in 1888, with subsequent renovations in 1909, 1918, 1922, and 1937.
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:12 PM   #101
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Lowndes County Courthouse, Valdosta GA -- and its SEVENTH courthouse





Location: Valdosta

Date Built: 1904-05

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Frank P. Milburn



This is the seventh courthouse in the history of Lowndes County. The first was a log structure built in Franklinville in 1828. When Lowndesville was named county seat in 1833, the wooden courthouse was moved from Franklinville. The next year, a new courthouse was built in Lowndesville, which in 1837 was renamed Troupville. Here, Lowndes County's third courthouse was built in 1842. This courthouse burned in 1858. The next year, the legislature moved the county seat from Troupville to Valdosta. Here, the county's fourth courthouse was built -- but it burned in 1869. A new courthouse was built on the city's public square in 1871. This structure was replaced in 1875 by a two-story red brick courthouse. After serving thirty years, this structure was torn down in 1904, with the current courthouse completed the following year. The Lowndes County courthouse is widely acknowledged as one of the most beautiful county courthouses in Georgia.

If salsa (the spread/dip) is your thing.....then there were people set up at the courthouse to sell it to you....
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:18 PM   #102
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Echols County Courthouse, Statenville GA... and a mispelled name for the county seat!

A sad modern courthouse, grand and functional clock towers replaced with radio towers.....






Location: Statenville

Date Built: 1956

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: W. Conner Thomson



The 1858 act creating Echols County named Harris Tomlinson, Guilford Register, and William B. Cruise as commissioners with authority to select the site and purchase land for location of the county seat. The legislation further provided that voters of the county assemble at the town of Troublesome on the first Monday in April 1859 and elect county officials. If, by the time of the election, the commissioners had not selected a county seat, the newly elected justices of the inferior court would be empowered to select the county seat. In 1859, either the commissioners or the inferior court designated Statenville as county seat. The settlement had been named for the community's first store owner, Capt. James Staten. The General Assembly incorporated Statenville by an act of Dec. 13, 1859 (Ga. Laws 1859, p. 200). (Unfortunately, the act incorrectly identified the new town as "Statesville" rather than "Statenville" -- a mistake that has never been corrected. Nevertheless, highway maps and local residents identify the town as "Statenville.")

In 1958, the General Assembly approved a local act redrawing the boundaries of Statenville. According to the legislation, the town's new boundaries consisted of the Echols County courthouse square -- meaning that the city had no official population. In 1965, the legislature approved a local act giving Statenville a new city charter (and one that spelled its name correctly). The legislation required approval in a referendum, but Statenville voters turned down the new charter.

By the early 1990s, Statenville was one of over 100 official towns that provided few if any services to their citizens. Some of these towns had long been inactive-- but legally they retained the status of an incorporated municipality. In an effort to deal with this problem, the General Assembly enacted legislation mandating that any incorporated city in Georgia must provide its citizens with at least three municipal services or lose its charter (O.C.G.A. sec. 36-30-7.1). Though given a grace period to comply, over 100 small or inactive towns -- including Statenville -- lost their municipal charters on July 1, 1995. At that point, they became unincorporated communities under the jurisdiction of their county governments. Today, Echols, Columbia, and Crawford are the only Georgia counties with an unincorporated community serving as county seat.
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:26 PM   #103
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Lanier County Courthouse, Lakeland GA...... and an al fresco lunch





Location: Lakeland

Date Built: 1973

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: Thomas Sanders



In an act of Aug. 11, 1919, the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Lanier County from Berrien, Clinch, and Lowndes counties (Ga. Laws 1919, p. 68). An act of Aug. 7, 1920 amended the constitutional amendment to redefine the boundaries of the new county (Ga. Laws 1920, p. 45). Georgia voters approved the constitutional amendment on Nov. 2, 1920, which marks the official date of Lanier County's creation (although a state historical marker on the courthouse grounds incorrectly lists Aug. 11, 1919 [the day the legislative act proposing the constitutional amendment was approved] and Aug. 7, 1920 [the day that act was amended] as the dates Lanier County was created).

Locals were raising money to help an man with medical bills related to cancer treatment. I traded legal tender for a half a chicken dinner. The old bird didn't put up much of a fight after laying out on that grill for a while. A coke, a smile and an Aleve were also enjoyed as i sat on the curb.
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:30 PM   #104
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Clinch County Courthouse, Homerville GA






Location: Homerville

Date Built: 1896

Architectural Style: Victorian functional with Neoclassical Revival additions

Designer: Unknown



The 1850 act creating Clinch County named a five-member commission with responsibility for selecting the county seat and erecting a courthouse built (Ga. Laws 1849-50, p. 126). Until the courthouse was built, the act directed that elections and superior and inferior court sessions be held in the house of Jonathan Knight. The first courthouse, built in 1852, burned in 1856. A new courthouse built in 1859 burned in 1867. The present courthouse was completed in 1896. In 1936, the WPA financed a major rehabilitation of the courthouse as well as construction of an addition to the structure.
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Old 10-05-2013, 05:35 PM   #105
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Atkinson County Courthouse, Pearson GA





Location: Pearson

Date Built: 1920

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: J.J. Baldwin



On Aug. 15, 1917, the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Atkinson County from the southern half of Coffee County and a small portion along the northern border of Clinch County (Ga. Laws 1917, p. 41).

Georgia voters ratified the constitutional amendment in the Nov. 5, 1918 general election, which is considered the date of Atkinson County's creation (although a state historical marker on the county courthouse grounds incorrectly cites the 1917 act proposing the constitutional amendment as the date of the county's creation). Georgia's 153rd county was named for former governor William Y. Atkinson (who served 1894-1898).

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