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Old 10-04-2013, 04:23 PM   #31
kosh
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dang dude... you are making me jealous. what's the mileage so far?
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Old 10-06-2013, 09:56 AM   #32
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Wink



Also, the skeptical third world kid in me wanted you to see this.
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:08 AM   #33
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Also, the skeptical third world kid in me wanted you to see this.
The shit we "people" do. I keep asking for directions to places and asking for the longer route or the dirt road. They look at you funny like "why?".

I don't know how many miles so far (I didn't take note of what it was when I left) but I think around 3-4k. Taking my time poking along. You want to zip down on you rocket ship? I'll stock the fridge.
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Old 10-06-2013, 12:25 PM   #34
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Keep it coming!!
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Old 10-06-2013, 02:40 PM   #35
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12. El Pescadero - West Coast'n

It’s the morning of 10/5 and I’ve been in La Paz now for 3 nights. This is a fun city. I’ve gotten a feel for it, met some people, and had a good time. This is a city that seems to have a bit of everything. You can have anything you want here, for the right price. Do you want a nice family vacation on the beach, or wild nights of debauchery? Maybe a historical getaway, or some time with the darker seedy underworld that quietly pulses throughout the city? If you look in the right places, it can all be had, and quite easily. This seems to be a Mexico thing.

The Hostel where I’ve been staying is called Baja Backpacker. For anyone wanting to stay in La Paz, this is a great place. Typically priced for hostels in the city ($250 pesos per night, current exchange is about 12.5/1usd) but is very well run and very professional. The owners (Rick and Eva) are very helpful and great hosts. The location is a couple blocks from the typical bar grinds and food places.

If you are traveling by moto there is also great gated parking.



The motos also can’t be seen from the street and there’s plenty of space for several bikes.



Time to head out though. I now have my camera fixed and am ready to roll. I haven’t seen the west coast since Ensenada, which was a couple weeks ago. I’m pretty close to the bottom of the Baja peninsula now and will be returning at some point to La Paz to catch a ferry to the mainland. At the bottom of the peninsula is Cabo San Lucas, I am told that it's a show of sorts and I can't leave without seeing it. Kind of like vegas, whether you want to see it or not, you have to go at least once. I like watching lots of shows, circus shows, freak shows. I even like to play a role in them every now and then. I’ll try anything once so might as well. Lots of other places to see on the way too Cabo as well.

First stop, Pescadero. A small surf community near the larger town of Todos Santos. It’s about an hour or so drive. The road is nice and big to accommodate the hordes of people going to and from Cabo.



Just on the south side of the town of Pescadero is the Pescadero Surf Camp. This place is close to two of the best surf breaks in all of Baja, Los Cherritos and El Pedrito are both just down the road. The “camp” is basically a hostel designed around the idea that lot’s of surfers want to be here. It’s a rad place and only 10 bones a night if you are willing to camp.






Looks like the dutchies (Michele and Erica) got word of the place as well.



They have a pool for lounging.





The pool sports a swim-up bar that you can also bring your own booze to.







If you want to get all Gordon Ramsay on it there is also an open-air communal kitchen that has a full gas range.



They have a camping available so I took that. It doesn’t really seem like camping though. I pull my bike right inside.



The inside is big, with power and lights. $10 per night ain’t bad, ain’t bad at all.

I went out to drive around the area and see what the town is like. First I went to take a look at the beach.



Then went out to drive around the little communities outside of town that all reside by the beach. There is a main area that has a network of dirt roads connecting all the houses.



Beautiful place to have a home and pass the days.



If you follow the roads as they wind around, between some of the houses closest to the beach will be little paths that lead down to the water. These beaches can be just as good as the main surf breaks, but are more remote.





Stomach is grumbling for some food. Don’t know what I want?


Shiieeeeeet who am I kidding. I want me some TACOS.



Got back to the spot and kicked it at the swim up bar for a while. You can get BIG beers here for 24 pesos, which is less than $2. I ended up chatting with Michele (the dutch guy driving around in the sweet old Volvo war ambulance) for quite a while. Asking him about how his journey came about, what lead up to it, what (if anything) he plans to do next. I like asking other people about their lives and the experiences they’ve had. Him and his girlfriend have been traveling for about 7 months. They started by shipping their vehicle to the US from the Netherlands. They both resigned from good jobs in the Netherlands to go and explore. They gave up and sacrificed a lot for this trip. Through the ups and downs and inherent uncertainty of what will happen in the future for both of their lives, they are confident it’s been the right thing to do. We talked on and on about the prospect of starting over after the accounts run dry, politics in each of our countries, and what we think things will be like in the future. Really interesting guy to chat with.

The next day I woke up and went straight down to the beach to surf for a bit. The wind is really low in the early morning and the water is less crowded. One of the locals let me use one of his boards for the morning which was sweet.



Not sure how long I’ll stay. Don’t really need to know either. This guys got the right idea.









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Old 10-08-2013, 09:31 AM   #36
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Great RR. I am enjoying it immensely.
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:49 AM   #37
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Great RR. I am enjoying it immensely.
Glad to hear it. More coming.
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:48 AM   #38
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13. Huffing Dirt

Been hanging out at the Pescadero Surf Camp for a couple days now.

Iíve explored the local areas.



Ate some damn fine tacos.





Adopted a new dog.



Michele got some work done on his whip.



I ate some more kick-ass tacos (this was all for only 44 pesos, less than $4)



And got a bit of lounging in.



Pescadero Surf Camp, you are a nice place. I like your chill atmosphere. I like your style. What I mean to say is, I really like you. But I also need to tell you something, you're great, but you're too comfortable. I'm a rambling man baby, and I need the unknown. I need excitement. Iím sorry, but I need the road. Goodbye for now, Pescadero.

A girl I met in La Paz and her friend are celebrating her birthday in Cabo San Lucas tomorrow at the southern most tip of Baja. Iím going to meet up with them there. I need to get my dirt fix satisfied first though. I picked up the GPX track files for a section of the Baja 1000 race route that ends in Cabo. I can pick up the trail about 10 miles north of where Iím at now and then ride dirt all the way down to Cabo. Saweeeeet.


I packed up my shit and headed north until the GPS told me it was time to get off the pavement and hit the dirt.



Right away I can tell taking this way to Cabo was the correct decision. This is going to be great.



The track is pretty remote, and runs north to south sort of near the Mex 1 hwy but a few miles inland from it. I shut my motor off to take a picture. It is beautiful and quiet here.






The first few miles are really pretty. The road is relaxing. Isn't this part of the Baja 1000? Whatís so difficult about this section of the race? If I was unloaded I would flyyyyy down these roads, and I'm on a beater. They are nice and smooth, relatively solid. Seems perfect.

Oh, that's more like it. As soon as I got cocky, I got stuck in a rut.



Iím still running my 16 tooth sprocket arenít I? Maybe I should swap out for my smaller one if Iím going to be doing more of this... I guess now isnít exactly the best time. I unloaded the bike a bit instead to get some weight off the rear. This did the trick and got her to the top.



The route crisscrosses a few other tracks.



Again I got cocky with the weight of the bike and spun out around a corner on a down-hill section. The bike hocky-pucked on the pannier and spun around 180 degrees before stopping. Iím familiar with ejecting off a small and light dirtbike, bit different getting free of this little piggy though. I was wondering when I would start getting into some decent off road and start coming off a bit. Maybe today will be the day.



Bent the shifter underneath the case. Metal was nice and hot so I carefully bent her back into a shiftable position. Back to work little lady.



Itís really pretty here.



And real dry.



And real hot.



There are lots of little creak beds running through the area. They are usually full of deep sand, and no water.



As I got further south the elevation started to climb and drop quite a bit. The terrain got a bit greener too.



I started seeing signs of inhabitants. A little old lady came out and stared at me after I took this picture. I waved. She looked at me like I was a martian. I waved again. She stared more confused. Maybe waving isnít a universal thing anymore.





More greenery, more elevation change.




The killer was getting tired and wanted another dirt-nap. This time she wanted it in deep sand.



Well shit, thatís fresh water right? Forgot what that looked like.



As I pushed further south the road opened up and hardened out. I could pick up the pace a bit. Hello horse.



Nevermind. More sand.



Like a junky diving into a pile of blow, my bike again couldnít resist a lay-down in the soft stuff. This time she wanted me to lay with her and as she went into the sand she pinned my right leg underneath the right pannier. Glad I got these big SIDI boots. I pushed the bike up just enough with my left arm to reach around and awkwardly dig out the sand under my right leg with my other arm. Leg is perfectly fine. Good engineering SIDI. Get back to work bike, quit horsing around!



Is that a mirage, or is that pavement?



Yep pavement, hello Cabo.






Found the girls and the hostel. Hey Cabo, you like to party right?



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Old 10-13-2013, 08:53 PM   #39
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14. Cabo Wabo

I would like to be able to say that I saw a lot of Cabo over the last two days. I would also like to be able to say that I took a lot of photos to share with you. Unfortunately, I’ve spent the last two days inebriated in one way or another and have thus taken zero photos, and everything that I did see, was seen through a hazy blurry filter. Luckily though, the girls that I met up with (Caszara and Ariane) are far more responsible than I, and they were able to juggle the adult task of both drinking and clicking a couple photos. Really though, we were only able to manage a few.

I pulled into the hostel parking area and was greeted from the balcony by Ariane and Casz. “How was the ride? Hurry up and get cleaned up, we are grabbing drinks!” Get cleaned up? I only have 2 shirts anyways?

Package deal for 2 margaritas, 2 shots of tequila, and 3 lobster tacos to get each of us started? Deal



We then continued the party at a series of locations. I started to pull out my amazing neolithic dance moves. The local women naturally loved it. So we partied more.



Went to bed eventually, then woke up and brushed off the last nights haze with more tequila and a dip in the pool.



Followed by yet more tequila, push-up challenges for buckets of beer, and wet t-shirt contests. Sorry guys, like I said, it was the girls taking photos, so we only get the push-up contest.



Rest was had eventually and my time in Cabo was complete.



This is a place where pretty much anything goes. It’s weird, funky, and fast paced. No matter what you pursue while here, eventually the stay goes by in a blur, one way or another. For most, it's not a long term destination. It's a place to be dabbled in, not a place to settle in. For me, I’ve stepped over and into the dark side for a bit. I even drank the cabo fever cool-aid, and let me tell you, it tasted pretty damn good. But what I’m left with is having my party itch scratched and I’m now ready to step back out of this weird alter-reality that is Cabo, and back into the real Mexico. I think I’ll head back to a place where there will be more locals than tourists. Maybe back to a place where the ATMs dispenses Mexican pesos rather than US dollar bills. Thanks for the good time Cabo, I’ve enjoyed my little vacation away from...well, my vacation. Now, back to Mexico.



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Old 10-14-2013, 10:07 AM   #40
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Iím now ready to step back out of this weird alter-reality that is Cabo, and back into the real Mexico. I think Iíll head back to a place where there will be more locals than tourists. Maybe back to a place where the ATMs dispenses Mexican pesos rather than US dollar bills. Thanks for the good time Cabo, Iíve enjoyed my little vacation away from...well, my vacation. Now, back to Mexico.


Well said. Vaya!
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Old 10-14-2013, 03:13 PM   #41
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Epic adventures! I love that you're letting the trip guide you. Thanks for taking us along!
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Old 10-14-2013, 04:15 PM   #42
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well done

Great trip!!! been on many a mexico trip-my thoughts are right in line with your words and how each town feels. Right with ya on San felipe, cabo, lorreto, todas, coco's, mulege!! keep on travlin!!!
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Old 10-14-2013, 08:30 PM   #43
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nice trip

Looks like some amazing riding. I'm enjoying the ride along. Stay safe and enjoy!
I believe we met at the d2d in 2012. I've got a good pic of you and your dad at the dinner.
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Old 10-15-2013, 07:39 AM   #44
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Glad you guys are enjoying it.

SOLOKLR - D2D is a rad time, when you have a minute you should blast me that pic if you can find it. Would be cool to have it.
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Old 10-15-2013, 11:43 AM   #45
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15. Voy A Mazatlan

After two days of partying I’m tuckered out and ready to gas up and hit the road. It’s Thursday morning (10/10/13) and I’m pretty sure that there is a freighter ferry leaving from La Paz to Mazatlan (on the mainland) Saturday afternoon. First though I want to check out a place called Canyon De La Zorra, which can be found roughly halfway between Cabo San Lucas and La Paz. There is supposed to be granite here, and waterfalls. Which means I can hopefully do some climbing and also jump off some tall shit into water. Yes, this sounds good.

First stop, San Jose del Cabo, the next major town east from Cabo, and where you switch directions to head north towards La Paz. It’s more laidback than Cabo, and seems to have itself a nice little thing going. It attracts the less intense vacationers that want the beach and the rays, but not the mayhem that is Cabo.



They even have a nice and relaxed eco building with plants growing on it. Aww isn’t that relaxing.



After I head north from San Jose Del Cabo the road becomes nice and curvy. The plays I’m heading towards is called CanyonDe La Zorra, so I guess that makes sense.



So much greener here in the South of Baja compared to the North.



After about an hour or so I turned west onto a dirt road towards the canyon.



Here I found a little town that had, no you didn’t guess it, a Zoo. Why there would be a zoo out here in the middle of nowhere is beyond me. Also the military. Maybe they came for the zoo.



I stocked up on some food and headed further west out of town towards the canyon.



Again I found sand.



After a few miles I also found a sign that reassured me I was actually in the right place. Looks like I’m close.



DAAAYUUUUMMMNNN, someone’s got a pretty driveway.



I got to the end of the driveway and found two evil looking dogs.



They were completely black and hairless, so all their coloring came from their funky sandpapery skin. They looked super fit, they demanded fear from you, but were oddly regal. They probably were birthed straight from the underworld and spend their days hunting souls to eat. I want one.



After I was done being intrigued by the dogs, I realized they were standing in front of a closed fence. I’m pretty sure that there were people somewhere on the property. But my bike isn’t quiet, and their isn’t exactly much else out here to make noise. So if they wanted me to come in and enjoy the Canyon they would have come to the gate. I waited for a while and enjoyed the dogs eary company some more. Nope, nobody is coming, alright, well I guess I’ll just go all the way to La Paz today. There’s a free beach that I can stay at there too. That’ll save me some pesos and help make up for all the money I spent getting silly in Cabo.

I headed back out the driveway and according to the GPS at the end of the driveway I was able to go left rather than turn back right and go down the way I had come. I don’t like backtracking so this was good. This road was much sandier though. Again I dumped the bike and again I pinned my leg under the metal pannier.

This time it was my left leg, which has my bum knee from a previous injury attached to it. It’s a very weird experience when your mental state changes gears so rapidly, things go from “everything is the norm” to “well shit”, very quickly. One minute I’m grinding along in soft sand thinking about my body position, thinking about what side of the sand rut will have better traction, wondering about what breed of dog that was back there, who actually lives all the way out here, can I make it to La Paz before sunset? Then boom. I’m forcibly thrown back into the present moment. I catch a particularly soft patch wrong and me and the bike are now down in the sand, pinned together awkwardly. I start assessing the situation.

Am I badly hurt?
No, nothing hurts, it was a slow spill. But I am stuck.
Is anyone else around to help lift the bike?
Mmm (I look around hoping yes). Who am I kidding though, I haven’t seen anyone for 3 hours.
Am I pinned against anything hot, is anything burning me?
No.

Cool, so I’m not in any immediate danger.

Alright, next, I can tell from looking at my leg that this is not good. How long can I stay in this position before it gets too painful and my strength to move the bike goes away?
I focus my attention on my left knee now. I can feel the pressure of the bike, and the unnatural angle of my leg, torquing on the surgical bolts that keep everything in place. My muscles and ligaments are working hard to keep shit together. Mmmmmm, not long. Maybe 3 minutes?

Alright then, it’s now or never. I’m pinned awkwardly enough that I can’t use my arms or core for any leverage to heave the bike up. Instead I need to use my pinned leg to leverage the bike up and wriggle free. I think for one last time, do I have any other options that don’t involve putting more strain on my knee and possibly wrecking it? Nope, if I wait too much longer, my window of opportunity to physically get out on my own is going to shut. I grit my teeth together and start to point and flex my boot as much as possible to loosen up the sand. I torque up on my knee and my leg starts to budge. I can feel all the ligaments working to their limit to stay attached, but after a few more seconds I am able wriggle free of the bike. With my knee back in line and the pressure and torque removed, I crawl away from the bike and roll over onto the ground. My knee is sore but nothing popped or went out so I’m golden. Relieved that I’m out now and the situation is solved, I chuckle to myself. It’s funny how again, your mental shift can go back from the “well shit” seriousness of a situation, to the “hah, well that could have sucked” attitude.



With everything in the just peachy again, I stand up carefully and go over to pick up my bike. With the bike upright, again I chuckle to myself at the juxtaposition of how close a fun time and shitty time can reside. Glad I came out on the ‘fun time’ side on this one.

Irony aside though, having low-speed tumbles in the dirt is normal, getting my leg stuck under the bike (now twice) however, is not normal, and can be a serious issue if I’m all alone in a place like this. It’s something that really shouldn’t be happening. I thought for a while about what it was that I did when going down that caused it, and how I could possibly have done with my body position to prevent it. I have an idea of what to do differently for the next time, and I’m sure I’ll have plenty of opportunities to practice. Hopefully I won’t be writing anymore about getting stuck under my bike.

After several hours I made it to La Paz and made it to the beach just after dusk.



By the time I got in I was exhausted and my body was sore. It felt good to be on a nice comfy beach with a cool ocean breeze and soft sounds of waves lapping on beach. I layed down on the beach and put in my headphones to listen to a full Alt-J album and take in the killer night sky. The milky way galaxy is pretty clear tonight. The music flowed and my body relaxed. Hard to find a concert venue this good anywhere else. Not too shabby, mother nature. Not too shabby at all.



The next day I lounged at the beach.



At some damn good ceviche.



And accidently put a whole in my sleeping mat.



There are two ferries that go from La Paz to Mazatlan, one is predominantly a commuter ferry (more luxurious) and the other is a freight/cargo ferry. I decided to take the freight ferry as this seemed more interesting than a posh commuter ferry. It’s a 15 hour trip so maybe I can interact with the locals a bit more too.

The next day I went to the terminal and booked my spot on the ferry. There were some paperwork issues but I was actually able to work through it with my broken spanish. Holy shit am I learning spanish?? There was a guy that I met and spoke to for a while at the docks. He offered to just load my bike into the back of his semi trailer, pay the passenger fee, and then ride across with him on the ferry. In hindsight this would have been a good deal, but my spanish wasn’t good enough at the time to really understand what he was offering and work out the specifics. I aired on the side of caution and just paid the individual motorcycle toll instead. This is the exact reason why knowing more spanish can be so helpful. Next time, Jhonathan.



Here’s the water steed we’ll be taking.



Hey, look who else is catching the same boat. The Dutchies and their dog Dunya.



We loaded up.



The dutchies (Michel and Erica) black rig on the left looks so small compared to the other rigs.



Dunya seemed pleased with her spot.



I got my bike strapped in.



Got some goats for neighbors.



Looks like things are lax in terms of where you can and can’t go around here. There’s the other commuter boat.





We took a look around the deck and then the boat set off.





Dinner was basic ferry food, but it’s pretty hard to mess up tacos. Nom nom nom nom.



The ferry is a night ferry which makes the 15hr commute really reasonable. This is the cargo ferry and there are few actual passengers, the majority of the cargo is just semi containers without their drivers. This means there are no real passenger accommodations, and those that are on board just sleep in their rigs. I found a nice spot on an empty gangplank above my bike to sleep.



Pretty top-notch sleeping spot if you ask me. Even have an open air window straight out the side of the hull. It’s maybe 30ft off the water and the breeze is perfect.



Being an island boy it’s nice being on the ocean again. The slow pitch and yaw of the boat as it rocks across the sea is comfortable and calming. Relaxation sets in. With the boat now well under way, headed away from Baja and towards the mainland, it feels like I’m moving to a different place, a new chapter. Although I know I could easily spend MUCH more time in Baja, I’m ready to go to the mainland. The Baja peninsula has served as a great set of training wheels for me. Baja is sort of like a watered down Mexico. It’s super safe, it’s very easy to travel, and there are still lots of people that speak a bit of english. As a person who doesn’t speak much spanish and has never been to Mexico, These are all good things for me. By traveling Baja first, I’ve been able to slowly dip my toes into the culture and get a feel for how things are done. Baja has given me a preview of Mexico, and I like what I’ve seen. I want the real thing now though. Catch you tomorrow Mazatlan.




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