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Old 10-09-2013, 04:33 PM   #121
tsimmons
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sorting out this weekend's ride......

I was thinking of doing a 'borders' run......catching all the counties on the state line that haven't been gotten. It came out to 1100 miles and I don't really have the time to make that happen now. Now I have to sort something else out. Might head southeast to the coast.
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Old 10-09-2013, 09:19 PM   #122
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Well if I didn't have a prior engagement this weekend I would probably be doing some tagging or courthouses or something. Gotta take out the new bike and break it in. So weekend after next I should be out and about.
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Old 10-12-2013, 01:17 PM   #123
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Calhoun County, Morgan GA








Location: Morgan

Date Built: 1930

Architectural Style: Colonial Revival

Designer: T.F. Lockwood, Jr



Calhoun County's first courthouse was built in Morgan shortly after the county was created in 1854. That structure burned in 1888, and a new courthouse was built on the site -- but it too burned in 1920. What served as courthouse for the next 15 years is not clear, but the county's present courthouse was constructed in 1935. The courthouse was renovated 1972.

After the founding of the county, there was a public debate on the location of the county seat with the towns of Concord and Whitney the principal contenders. The controversy finally was resolved when it was agreed to have a site exactly half way between the two towns. Here, a town was laid out and named Morgan. The origin of the town's name is debated but may have been to honor either Hiram Morgan (one of the town's first five commissioners) or Revolutionary War general Daniel Morgan. On Mar. 5, 1856, the legislature incorporated Morgan as a town (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 381).

In 1923, voters of Calhoun County petitioned for a referendum to move the county seat from Morgan to Arlington. In a 975-456 vote, county residents approved the change, and on July 27, 1923, the General Assembly formally designated Arlington the new county seat of Calhoun County (Ga. Laws 1923, p. 217). However, the majority of county residents soon became uphappy with the new county seat and in 1929 petitioned for a referendum to return the county seat to Morgan. In the election, 1033 voters favored Morgan, 496 chose Arlington, and 5 voters preferred Edison. Consequently, on Aug. 6, 1929, the legislature designated Morgan once again county seat (Ga. Laws 1929, p. 550).

The courthouse square was surrounded by flags.

Picked up Calhoun County Friday afternoon after work to fill in that void for southwest Georgia. Somewhere along the ride i must have pinched a nerve in my shoulder or neck with my big ole head bouncing around. It was still hurting enough Saturday morning that i stayed off the motorcycle. I'll try to get out there Sunday and get a few more.
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Old 10-13-2013, 02:24 PM   #124
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Bleckly County, Cochran Georgia






Location: Cochran

Date Built: 1914

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Sayre & Baldwin

Other Information: It is unclear what served as Bleckley County courthouse from 1912 to 1914, when the present courthouse was built. Since then, there have been several renovations and additions to the courthouse.

County History: On July 30, 1912 , the General Assembly proposed a constitutional amendment to create Bleckley County from a portion of Pulaski County (Ga. Laws 1912, p. 38). In that year's general election, Georgia voters ratified the proposed amendment on Oct. 2, 1912, which marks the official date of Bleckley County's creation (although a state historical marker on the courthouse grounds incorrectly cites the county's creation as the day the legislative act proposing the constitutional amendment was approved).

Georgia's 147th county was named for former Georgia Supreme Court chief justice Logan Bleckley, who held the post 1887-1894.

Why was Bleckley County created by constitutional amendment instead of an act of the General Assembly? In 1904, Georgia voters had approved a constitutional amendment limiting the number of counties in the state to 145. The next year, the General Assembly created eight new counties, bringing the total number to 145 -- the constitutional limit. Nevertheless, there was continuing pressure to create more counties. Beginning in 1906, lawmakers got around the 145-county limitation by creating new counties through constitutional amendments that were not subject to the limitation. By 1924, Georgia had 161 counties -- 16 of which had been created by constitutional amendment. On Jan. 1, 1932, Milton and Campbell counties merged with Fulton, leaving 159 counties. In 1945, Georgia voters ratified a new constitution -- one which provided an absolute limit of 159 counties, with an additional provision (see text) that no new country could be created except through consolidation of existing counties.

County Seat: The 1912 constitutional amendment creating Bleckley County designated Cochran as county seat. Cochran, initially known as Dykesboro, was first settled in the 1850s. After the Macon & Brunswick Railroad was built through Dykesboro, local residents renamed the town after that railroad's president, Arthur Cochran. On March 19, 1869, the legislature incorporated Cochran (Ga. Laws 1869, p. 75).


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Old 10-13-2013, 02:29 PM   #125
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Dodge County, Eastman Georgia





Location: Eastman

Date Built: 1908

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: E.C. Hosford

Other Information: After the county creation, William Dodge had a two-story frame courthouse built at his expense -- presumably in appreciation for the county having been named in his honor. In 1906 or 1907, this courthouse was torn down and replaced by the current two-story brick courthouse (see early photo).

County History: Dodge County was created on Oct. 26, 1870 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1870, p. 18). Formed from portions of Montgomery, Pulaski, and Telfair counties, Dodge County's original boundaries were defined as:

That there shall be a new county laid out and formed of the thirteenth, (13th) fourteenth, (14th) fifteenth, (15th) sixteenth, (16th) nineteenth (19th) and twentieth (20th) land districts of originally Wilkinson county, (except that portion of said land districts numbers thirteen, (13) sixteen (16) and nineteen (19) which now lie in and constitute a part of Laurens county) now forming parts of the counties of Pulaski, Telfair and Montgomery; that said new county shall be called the county of Dodge. . . .

Dodge County's borders with Pulaski and Telfair counties were adjusted in 1872, 1874, 1875, and 1876.

Georgia's 136th county was named for former New York congressman and industrialist William Dodge (1805-1883). After the Civil War, Dodge served one term in Congress and then began purchasing large amounts of land in the area that would become Dodge County. Here, he established a number of lumber mills and is credited as one of the pioneers of Georgia's timber industry.

County Seat: The act creating Dodge County directed that its county seat would be station No. 13 on the Macon & Brunswick Railroad, which the act also recognized as being known as Eastman. The community that would eventually become Eastman was first settled around 1840. When the route of the Macon & Brunswick Railroad came through after the Civil War, the settlement became a train depot known as Station No. 13. In 1870, the town was named for William P. Eastman, a business associate of William Dodge who settled here that year. Eastman was incorporated on Oct. 27, 1870 by an act of the General Assembly


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Old 10-13-2013, 02:35 PM   #126
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Telfair County, McRae Georgia





Location: McRae

Date Built: 1934

Architectural Style: Colonial Revival

Designer: Dennis & Dennis

Other Information: The date of completion of Telfair County's first courthouse is not clear. In an act of Dec. 14, 1815, the legislature incorporated Jacksonville and directed the new town commissioners to assemble "at the court-house in said town" (Ga. Laws 1815, p. 68). However, in Dec. 1816, the legislature authorized Telfair County's inferior court to levy a special tax for building a courthouse and jail. In Dec. 1818, additional legislation was enacted authorizing the inferior court to levy a special tax and to continue it from year to year until a courthouse and jail were completed. So unless the first courthouse was built on borrowed money, it seems probable that it was not completed until around 1820.

Little is known about the fate of Telfair County's first courthouse and how many other courthouses were built during the following half century. A wooden, two-story courthouse was built in Jacksonville around 1860 (see photo). In 1871, the county seat moved from Jacksonville to McRae. In an act of Aug. 27, 1872, the legislature authorized Telfair County officials to borrow the necessary funds "and apply the proceeds to the completion of the new court-house now being erected in said county" (Ga. Laws 1872, p. 470). The new courthouse -- a large, two-story brick structure -- was completed in 1873 (see photo). This building, however, burned in the early 1930s. It was replaced by Telfair County's current courthouse, which was completed in 1934.

County History: Telfair County was created from Wilkinson County by an act of the General Assembly approved Dec. 10, 1807 (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 37). Georgia's 35th county was named for former governor and congressman Edward Telfair (1735-1807).

In 1812, the legislature transferred the portion of Telfair County between the Oconee and Little Ocmulgee rivers to Montgomery County. In 1819 and 1825, the legislature transferred respectively land lots 1 and 6 in Appling County to Telfair County (Ga. Laws 1819, p. 45 and 1825, p. 61). These transfers (see map) gave Telfair a substantial area of land south of the Ocmulgee River. However, in 1854, the legislature transferred this area to newly created Coffee County (Ga. Laws 1854, p. 294).

The last loss of land came in 1870, when areas of northern Telfair County were used to form Dodge County (Ga.Laws 1870, p. 18 ). However in 1872 and 1875, areas of Dodge County were transferred back to Telfair County (Ga. Laws 1872, p. 408 and 1875, p. 275). The last boundary adjustment came in 1877, when the lands of Bradley Harralson (land lots 265, 266, 272, and 273 in the 10th district) in Montgomery County were shifted Telfair County (Ga. Laws 1877, p. 277).

County Seat: The 1807 act creating Telfair County provided that courts and county business initially be conducted at the house of Jesse Bird. On Dec. 22, 1808, the legislature provided that effective immediately, county elections and other business would be held at the home of John Patterson (actually Peterson). An act of Dec. 8, 1810 repealed the 1808 act and authorized the justices of the inferior court to pick any site for a county seat, so long as it was in the 8th land district and on the Ocmulgee River. The act further directed that elections and other county business be conducted at the residence of Mark Pregon (actually Pridgen) in the 8th district until a courthouse could be built.

An act of Dec. 13, 1811 directed that the Telfair County courthouse and other public buildings be built on land lot 79 in the 8th district on the Ocmulgee River on land purchased from Jesse Wiggins, Jr. The justices of the inferior court were authorized to contract for the building of a courthouse and jail. Until a courthouse was completed, the legislation provided that court sessions, elections, and other county business take place in the house of Jesse Wiggins or such other place in land lot 79 as the inferior court should determine.

Still, nothing happened -- so in an act of Dec. 7, 1812, the legislature provided that the inferior court purchase between 50 and 202 acres of land for erecting a courthouse and other public buildings. The act directed that the site be within two miles of the center of the county and on or near the Ocmulgee River. [At that time, the Ocmulgee River flowed through the middle of Telfair County.] Until the courthouse was built, courts and elections were to be held at the house of Mark Pridgen.

Despite the acts of 1810, 1811, and 1812, Telfair County still did not have a courthouse or county seat. In Nov. 1813, the legislature passed a new act authorizing the inferior court to build a courthouse and jail on land lot 340 in the 8th district (Ga. Laws 1813, p. 76). The legislation further provided that as soon as a courthouse was built on lot 340, that site would become the permanent county seat of Telfair County.

For whatever reason, the inferior court failed to implement the 1810, 1811, 1812, or 1813 acts, so in 1814 state lawmakers passed another act confirming land lot 340 as the site for building a courthouse (Ga. Laws 1814, p. 53). However, rather than wait for completion of a courthouse, this act declared that land lot 340 henceforth was Telfair County's permanent county seat. Subsequently, the land lot was surveyed and subdivided. One lot was reserved for a courthouse and jail, with the other lots to be sold for settlement of a new town. On Nov. 25,1815, the General Assembly provided that Telfair County's new seat of government be named Jacksonville (Ga. Laws 1815, p. 126). In an act of Dec. 14, 1815, the legislature incorporated Jacksonville and directed the new town commissioners to assemble "at the court-house in said town" (Ga. Laws 1815, p. 68). As for the town's name, the legislation specifically noted that "the name of Jacksonville is here intended to perpetuate the name and memory of the late hero of New Orleans." That hero, of course, was Gen. Andrew Jackson, who on Dec. 8, 1815 had defeated British forces at the Battle of New Orleans.

After the southern half of Telfair County was transferred to newly created Coffee County in 1854, the county seat of Jacksonville no longer was in the center of the county. In fact, it was now just a few miles north of Telfair County's new southern boundary -- the Ocmulgee River. As a result, many Telfair County residents began calling for removal of the county seat to a more central location. In an act of March 3, 1856, the legislature authorized the inferior court to call an election on removing the county seat. The act further provided that if a majority of voters approved removal, the inferior court was to purchase at least twenty acres as near the center of the county as possible and lay out a new county seat, which was to be named Ridgley (Ga. Laws 1855-56, p. 481). It is not clear whether the inferior court ever called a referendum-- but if an election actually was held, supporters of removal lost. The outbreak of the Civil War brought a temporary end to efforts to move Telfair's county seat.

After the Civil War, the Macon & Brunswick Railroad was built through eastern Telfair County, bypassing Jacksonville by twenty miles (see map). This fact, plus Jacksonville's location near the southern boundary of the county, led to renewed agitation for removal of the county seat to a more central location In Oct.1870, the General Assembly passed legislation calling for an election on designating a new county seat and allowing Telfair County officials to levy a special tax for erecting of a suitable courthouse and jail (Ga. Laws 1870, p. 29).

The Oct. 1870 legislation did not authorize a referendum on whether or not to move the county seat. Rather it provided for election of five commissioners "whose duty it shall be to select a suitable site on the Macon & Brunswick Railroad, as near the center of said county as practicable, for the capital or county-site of said county of Telfair." The election took place on Dec. 20, 21, and 22 of 1870. It is not known how long the commissioners deliberated on selecting a new county seat -- but presumably they made their decision during the final week of 1870 or in early 1871.

The site selected as Telfair County's new county seat was the railroad station of McRae on the Macon & Brunswick Railroad. Before the Civil War, the McRaes and several other groups of Scottish Presbyterians from the Carolinas had emigrated to this area. Around 1870, track for the Macon & Brunswick was laid through the plantation of Daniel McRae. A railroad station was built here and named for the McRae clan. A town quickly sprung up, and the legislature incorporated McRae as a town on March 3, 1874 (Ga. Laws 1874, p. 157). According to that act, McRae's city limits included everything within one-half mile of the courthouse.


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Old 10-13-2013, 02:40 PM   #127
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Laurens County, Dublin Georgia





Location: Dublin

Date Built: 1962

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer: Cunningham and Forehand

Other Information: The current courthouse is the fourth courthouse in Laurens County history. At the time of the county's creation in Dec. 1807, there was no county seat or courthouse. The act creating Laurens County provided that courts and public business initially be held at the house of Peter Thomas (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). Sumterville was designated county seat in 1809, but it is not clear what served as courthouse. The legislature moved the county seat to Sand Bar on the Oconee River in 1810, and then to Dublin in 1811. A temporary courthouse was built in 1811 in either Sand Bar or Dublin. At some point after Dublin became county seat, a two-story courthouse was built. The third Laurens County courthouse -- a large, two-story brick structure with imposing clock tower -- was built in 1895 [see postcard 1, postcard 2, and postcard 3]. This building served until a new one-story courthouse was constructed in 1962.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here

County History: Laurens County was one of six new counties created by an act of the General Assembly approved Dec. 10, 1807 (Ga. Laws 1807, p. 3). According to that legislation, Laurens County's original boundaries were specified as:

. . . all that tract or parcel of land herein after pointed out, long and being in the county of Wilkinson, beginning at the mouth of Big Sandy Creek, on the Oconce river, running south sixty degrees west to the Ocmulgee river; thence down the meanders of the same to the upper corner of the fourteenth district on said river; thence north sixty degrees cast to the Oconee river; thence up the same to the beginning. . . .

Georgia's 34th county was named for Col. John Laurens of South Carolina. Laurens, who had been aide-de-camp to George Washington, was involved in numerous battles -- including the siege of Savannah -- and was killed in battle in 1782.

On Dec. 13, 1808, the legislature created Pulaski County from Laurens County (Ga. Laws 1808, Nov.-Dec. Sess., p. 52). On Dec. 11, 1858, portions of Laurens County were used to create Johnson County (Ga. Laws 1858, p. 32).







This postcard, printed and hand tinted in Germany, was published by the Dublin Courier Dispatch and bears a Dec. 10, 1909 postmark from Dublin. Because the address side of the postcard has an area for a personal message, which was only allowed after March 1907, the postcard was printed between 1907 and 1909 -- which would mean that the photo likely was taken before 1909.

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Old 10-14-2013, 10:48 AM   #128
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Sharpen your highlighter.....

That looks close to what i have..... Sharpen your highlighter.....



Looks like i am done hunting courthouses for a few weeks. My saddle is off to Russell this week for a modification so it will be the end of the month before it returns.

Good to see you got out and put a few more on the done list.

Highlighters and paper maps -- we are so high tech!
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Old 10-14-2013, 12:13 PM   #129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsimmons View Post
That looks close to what i have..... Sharpen your highlighter.....

Looks like i am done hunting courthouses for a few weeks. My saddle is off to Russell this week for a modification so it will be the end of the month before it returns.

Good to see you got out and put a few more on the done list.

Highlighters and paper maps -- we are so high tech!
I have a Corbin seat and it is so much better than the stock seat, still, after a tank of gas I'm happy to get off. I've heard the Russel seats are pretty good so you should be able to do that 1100 mile stint you were talking about and as a plus, you can get an Iron Butt Certificate!

High Tech? My GPS is a plastic map I keep in the trunk!
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Old 10-20-2013, 02:45 PM   #130
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Camden County, Woodbine GA



Couldn't find the Marker, According to the Georgia Info site it's on a street location that is about a block away. So I am just linking to their picture.





Location: Woodbine

Date Built: 2004

Architectural Style: Modern

Designer:

Other Information: Camden County's first courthouse was a frame structure built at Jefferson in the early 1800s, before the county seat moved to St. Patrick, then finally to Woodbine.

County History: The land that would form Camden County was ceded to the English by the Creeks in the Treaty of Savannah on May 21, 1733, confirmed and expanded by agreements of 1735 and 1736. By an act of March 15, 1758, the colonial legislature created seven parishes. With the outbreak of the American Revolution, Whig forces took control of government in Georgia. On Feb. 5, 1777, they adopted the state's first constitution -- the Constitution of 1777. Art. IV of that document transformed the existing colonial parishes into seven counties, with Indian ceded lands forming an eighth county. Camden County, which was last on the list and thus is considered Georgia's eighth county, consisted of Saint Thomas and Saint Mary parishes (see map). The county was named for the Earl of Camden, who supported the American colonies' cause prior to the Revolution. In 1854, the legislature took land from Camden County to form Charlton County

County Seat: On Feb. 10, 1787, the General Assembly designated the community of St. Patrick's as county seat of Camden County. In 1792, that act was repealed and the legislature appointed commissioners to select a new site for the county courthouse and jail. Apparently, Camden County was without an official county seat from 1792 until 1800, when the legislature designated Jefferson [later Jeffersonton] seat of government. Jeffersonton served as county seat until 1869, when the General Assembly named St. Marys as the new county seat. In 1923, an act was approved moving the county seat to Woodbine. Incorporated on Aug. 13, 1908, Woodbine presumably was named for the honeysuckle plant of the same name.

This is a picture of the old Courthouse



Date Built: 1928

Architectural Style: Twentieth-Century Gothic Revival

Designer: J. deBruyn Kops
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Old 10-20-2013, 02:52 PM   #131
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Charlton County - Folkston, GA







Location: Folkston

Date Built: 1928

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival/Georgian Revival

Designer: Roy A. Benjamin

Other Information: It is not clear what served as Charlton County's courthouse for the first two years after its creation in Feb. 1854. The legislature had provided that Trader's Hill served as temporary county seat until a county referendum could be held in April 1855 to choose a permanent county seat. In that election, voters chose Trader's Hill -- but the county did not have sufficient funding to build a courthouse. In March 1856, the legislature authorized the Charlton County to levy a special tax to fund construction of a courthouse and jail. Subsequently, a two-story wooden courthouse was built in Trader's Hill. That building burned in 1877. Presumably, a second courthouse was built, though details are missing out as to when and the building's appearance and composition. In 1901, the legislature designated Folkston as the new county seat, and a courthouse was built here in 1902 (see postcard). That structure burned down in 1928, and the current courthouse was built the same year. In 1978, an annex was added to the courthouse.
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Old 10-20-2013, 03:15 PM   #132
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Bulloch County, Statesboro GA







Location: Statesboro

Date Built: 1894

Architectural Style: Queen Anne, with Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Bruce & Morgan (1894), J. Bruyn Kops (1914)

Other Information: After its creation in 1796, Bulloch County functioned without a courthouse while local officials debated where the county seat should be located. During this time, superior court sessions were held in private homes and other places. Following Statesboro's designation as county seat in 1803, a wooden courthouse was built. In 1807, the first courthouse was replaced by a larger wooden building, which served until burned during Sherman's March to the Sea in 1864. In 1866, the legislature authorized county officials to levy a tax for rebuilding the courthouse. Proceeds of this tax were used to build a two-story wooden building, which served until the present courthouse was built in 1894 (see photo). As part of a renovation in 1914, pedimented porticos supported by columns were added to the entrances to the courthouse.
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Old 10-20-2013, 03:30 PM   #133
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Glynn county, Brunswick, GA

This is not the current courthouse. It apparently was replaced in 1991. This is the old courthouse, I did not get a picture of the new one, so someone will have to go back.

[edit]Jub said he was OK with just using a file photo of the new courthouse the old ones are more interesting anyway. So I finished out the post.[/edit]



Location: Brunswick

Date Built: 1907

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: C.A. Gifford and E.S. Betts



Location: Brunswick

Date Built: 1991

Architectural Style: Neoclassical Revival

Designer: Hansen, Lind, Meyer, Inc.
Associate Architect: W.S. Ledbetter





Other Information: In addition to creating Georgia's first eight counties, the Constitution of 1777 provided that: "A court-house and jail shall be erected at the public expense in each county, where the present [constitutional] convention or the future legislature shall point out and direct." However, because of the war with Great Britain, it is not clear if this provision was ever implemented. In 1791, the state legislature enacted a law providing for commissioners to designate a site for a Glynn County courthouse and oversee its construction -- but whether a courthouse actually was built is not known. In 1817, the legislature authorized county officials to levy a tax to build a courthouse, but again it is not clear what happened. In Dec. 1825, the legislature authorized the county's superior and inferior courts to meet in the Glynn County Academy. The law also made reference to "the house formerly occupied as a court-house at Brunswick," which suggests that Glynn County did not have an actual courthouse at the time. A courthouse was built at some unknown date, but apparently it was less than satisfactory. For example, in Dec. 1845, the legislature enacted an act allowing Glynn County superior and inferior courts to meet "in the new academy building in the town of Brunswick, instead of the court-house." An act of Dec. 1849 allowed Glynn County's inferior court and the court of ordinary to meet in the county clerk's office "instead of the Court-house."

For the following three decades, Glynn County apparently functioned without a real courthouse, instead renting space for use as courtrooms. Finally, in 1883 county officials authorized construction of a new courthouse. In 1884, the new three-story brick courthouse was completed (see photo). Twelve years later, it was badly damaged in the great hurricane that hit Georgia's coast in 1896. The following year, county officials began a campaign for a bond referendum to finance replacement of the damaged courthouse. However, that referendum failed, so the 1884 courthouse continued in use.

Construction of a new courthouse was completed in 1907 (see photo). This building was used until 1991, when a new courthouse was completed across the street. In the mid-1990s, Glynn County built the W. Harold Pate Courthouse Annex several blocks away (see photo). Renovation of the 1907 courthouse was begun in the late 1990s, with the intent to use the restored building as offices and a meeting hall for the Glynn County Commission. Completion of that project was subsequently delayed on several occasions due to lack of funding, and as of 2000 is still not complete.

GAVic screwed with this post 10-21-2013 at 07:39 AM
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Old 10-21-2013, 01:00 AM   #134
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Looks like you did some riding this weekend Mike! Nice haul!

I like the Glynn County Courthouse much mo better!
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Old 10-27-2013, 10:34 AM   #135
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Floyd County, Rome, GA



Pano




Other Information: Floyd County's first courthouse was a log cabin built in Livingston in 1833. On Dec. 20, 1834, the General Assembly designated Rome as county seat. It is not known what initially served as the county courthouse, but around 1840 a new courthouse and jail were built, as evidenced by the fact that in an act of Dec. 19, 1840, the General Assembly authorized the justices of Floyd County's inferior court to levy a special tax "for the purpose of paying the debt already incurred by the erection of a Court-House and Jail in said county" (Ga. Laws 1840, p. 184). It is not clear how long the 1840 courthouse was used, but apparently a third courthouse was built sometime prior to the Civil War (as indicated by war-time references to the "old courthouse" in Rome). Though Rome was occupied by Union troops for six months in 1864, the courthouse was spared -- despite Sherman's order that his troops burn all public property upon departing.

What is believed to be Floyd County's fourth courthouse -- a new two-story brick courthouse with clock tower --was built in 1892-93 (see photo and profile). Though no longer used as a courthouse, this building still stands as the most prominent structure in the Floyd County government complex in downtown Rome.

Floyd County's fifth courthouse (see photo) originally served as the U.S. Post Office for Rome. Construction began in 1895 and was completed in January 1896. Opened for business on Jan. 30, 1896. the facility was subsequently remodeled in 1904, 1911, and 1941. The post office moved to a new federal building constructed in 1974. The next year, Floyd County purchased the old post office building for use by county agencies and courts. Between 1975 and 1978, the building was renovated and modernized, finally opening as the new Floyd County Courthouse in June 1978.

Lack of space forced Floyd County to construct its sixth and present courthouse in 1995. Built in conjunction with a new civic center, the multi-purpose county government building is located behind the old 1893 courthouse. Officially known as the Administrative Courthouse Building, this three-story brick structure houses the offices and courtrooms for Floyd County's superior court and other county courts, additionally serving as offices for various administrative agencies. Meanwhile, the 1893 courthouse continues in use, housing the tax commissioner and other county offices. Also, the old U.S. Post Office (which still bears the designation "Floyd County Court House" above the front entrance) continues to be used by county agencies, though it no longer serves as a court house.

Completing the buildings in the Floyd County government complex is the Rome-Floyd County Law Enforcement Center (see photo) build in 1998 across the street from the front of the 1893 courthouse. It houses the city and county police departments and jail, while the county sheriff's department has been moved to new facilities outside the downtown Rome area.

County Courthouse Historical Marker: Click here

County History: Floyd County was created from Cherokee County on Dec. 3, 1832 by an act of the General Assembly (Ga. Laws 1832, p. 56). [Click here for complete text of legislation.] According to that act, Floyd County was to consist of the 22nd, 23rd, and 24th districts of the 3rd Section, and the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 14th, 15th, and 16th districts of the 4th Section of the original Cherokee County (see map).

In way of background, by 1830, the Cherokee Nation consisted of most of northwest Georgia (see map), plus adjoining areas in Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Even while Cherokee Indians remained on their homeland in Georgia, the General Assembly on Dec. 21, 1830 enacted legislation claiming "all the Territory within the limits of Georgia, and now in the occupancy of the Cherokee tribe of Indians; and all other unlocated lands within the limits of this State, claimed as Creek land" (Ga. Laws 1830, p. 127). The act also provided for surveying the Cherokee lands in Georgia; dividing them into sections, districts, and land lots; and authorizing a lottery to distribute the land. On Dec. 26, 1831, the legislature designated all land in Georgia that lay west of the Chattahoochee River and north of Carroll county as "Cherokee County" (see map) and provided for its organization (Ga. Laws 1831, p. 74). However, the new county was not able to function as a county because of its size and the fact that Cherokee Indians still occupied portions of the land. On Dec. 3, 1832, the legislature added areas of Habersham and Hall counties to Cherokee County, and then divided the entire area into nine new counties -- Cass (later renamed Bartow), Cobb, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Murray, Paulding, and Union -- plus a reconstituted and much smaller Cherokee County. Cherokee lands were distributed to whites in a land lottery, but the legislature temporarily prohibited whites from taking possession of lots on which Cherokees still lived. By 1833, however, whites began occupying areas of Floyd County.

The official basis for Georgia claiming possession of all Cherokee lands in Georgia was the Treaty of New Echota of Dec. 29, 1835. In this treaty, a faction of the Cherokees agreed to give up all Cherokee claims to land in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and North Carolina and move west in return for $5 million. Though a majority of Cherokees opposed the treaty and refused to leave, the U.S. and Georgia considered it binding. In 1838, U.S. Army troops rounded up the last of 15,000 Cherokees in Georgia and forced them to march west in what came to be known as the "Trail of Tears."

Georgia's 88th county was named for Gen. John Floyd, who was involved in various campaigns against the Creek Indians in the early 1800s and later served in the Georgia General Assembly and U.S. Congress.

Portions of Floyd County were used to create Chattooga County (1838), Gordon County (1850), and Polk County (1851). Between 1840 and 1856, the General Assembly transferred land between Chattooga and Floyd counties on ten occasions.
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