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Old 11-01-2013, 11:52 AM   #76
buzzardair
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I am enjoying the journey. What an adventure. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:18 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowknife View Post
minute 3:58 "I think it's good"
minute 4:00 "just joking"
minute 4:09 - dump the bike


Thanks for putting a smile on my face today with your video. (any excuse to avoid the paper work waiting for me on my desk). This looked like an awesome section to ride.

Keep posting this enjoyable RR.

YK
I'm much better at dumping the bike than I am spanish, I'll do my best to keep you from working.

Part 2 coming soon, maybe tomorrow? (I get to be on Mexico time too right?)
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Old 11-02-2013, 12:35 PM   #78
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22. Getting Dirty In Hidalgo (Part 2)

After a night of free drinks and dance we awoke and rubbed the sleep out of our eyes. I’m glad it was dark last night, as my choice of clothing was pretty terrible. Jose said to pack light for the weekend, I took it literally and brought no normal clothes to wear while not riding. So I improvised and wore my motorcycle liners to the wedding and sweet 16 party last night. I used a GPS cable as a belt to keep my silky smooth pants up. Jose and Dano decided it was easier to just tell people I was from Germany so that other people wouldn’t question my clothing style.



We then went searching for some food. The climate and elevation here does cool stuff with the sky.



We walked to the town square where we were told there would be good street food for breakfast.



We found this lovely lady, and of course, she knew exactly what the fuck was up with good tamales.



She had several different kinds, I tried one of them all.



She also had a magical green beverage. Can’t remember the name, it tastes like some sort of hot and thick juice drank, but apparently it is not juice at all but rather it is made with maize? Either way, it’s my new favorite hot beverage and I felt like a newborn champion after imbibing it.



Topped it off with one of these fancy things. Again, some sort of tamale.



Full and content we said thanks and walked around the town center. Didn’t take long as this is it.



There is a nice little garden though.



And here’s the big man himself, Nicholas Flores, the hombre the town is named after.



This is some sort of church I believe.



And here’s a statue of an important guy doing something important.



After walking and chatting for a bit we came back to the bikes and our rooms.



I apologize to the cleaning person, all my stuff was pretty darn muddy.



We packed up the bikes, and topped up on gas bought from the the place we stayed at.



We headed out of town and back onto the dirt.



The roads looked like they would be good.



And of course, they were.



The good roads looked like they would continue for longer still.



And again, they did.



Dropping down into the valleys we found small creeks.



And seemingly randomly placed churches.



There were bridges as well.



And kids going about their business down below in the river.



We also found a river without a bridge.



It needed to be crossed so we checked it for any big rocks that would dump us into the wet.



Here’s a little video of us crossing (0:41 sec).



After the bikes were across we stopped for a wee snack.



“Hey look, it’s a cow-asaki” - Jose



The roads got bigger now and more open.



Still nice and scenic though.



We would come in and out of towns, some bigger than others. But none larger than a handful of buildings and maybe a small town square like this one.





We stopped here for a minute as Jose had spotted something unique.



In the town square there was a wall that was full of phrases and cool saigns. The wall says “Typical phrases and words that identify us”. Little places like this are exactly why traveling by motorcycle is so special. When you aren’t reliant on public transportation or tourist buses, you are able to slow down, make an effort to experience stuff outside the box and maybe even get out into some remote places. When you can do that, you will often find a unique experience and a cool view into the unadulterated culture of an area. Pretty cool.









A little while later and we found pavement again.



We were hungry and this guy seemed inviting, so we stopped at his restaurant.



They whipped us up some food pretty quick.



And we also tried some of their home brew apple wine. It was more rocket fuel than wine.



After eating we hopped back on the tarmac of what used to be the main highway through Mexico to Texas. Now that there are much better options this one happens to be pretty empty. It also happens to be absolutely fucking radical. The number of perfectly cambered turns flowing into opposing and equally perfectly cambered turns is uncountable. In my opinion this is the best scenic curvy road that I have ever been on. The great part is that it’s not just a couple miles long, it’s at least a solid 1hr+ of exactly this.





In addition to the turns, the road sliced right along the side of some pretty drastic scenery.



After the turns subsided we began exiting the mountain range and coming back down towards the flatter plains.



On our final exit off the mountain we crossed a bridge and stopped for a view.







From here on we would be heading back towards the immense urban sprawl that is DF (mexico city) and away from the rural simplicity of where we had been throughout this lovely weekend. There are pros and cons to both, but I have very much enjoyed my little backroads trip through the state of Hidalgo. I’ve had a pretty damn good weekend in the dirt, thanks Jose and Dano for a great time. On the way back into DF I picked up a flat on the freeway. There wasn’t much of a shoulder and not much light to patch a tire with, but I didn’t really care. It’s hard to have a little ol’ flat sour such a fantastic weekend.








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Old 11-02-2013, 02:56 PM   #79
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Hidalgo RULES!

Incredibly fun weekend.
I need that T-mod on my bike soon.
So glad you took care of Bernal, reckless drunken kid. You missed the dancing at the wedding thanks to Bernal.
A video should be edited pretty soon, will share.
More riding to come Chon!
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Old 11-02-2013, 04:51 PM   #80
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"There was a paper sign back there that said go the other way...but that doesn't mean we can't go through here"..

Haha, I nearly lost it when I heard you say that. If I had a dollar for every time I've heard you say that... Glad you are alive
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Old 11-06-2013, 07:18 AM   #81
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23. DualSport In Mexico (Video)

Jose put a video together from the footage that we shot throughout the ride into the state of Hidalgo. Thanks Jose for a fun visual memory of the weekend.

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Old 11-06-2013, 08:36 AM   #82
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great video! really cool to see video of the places you've written about and posted stills. looks like you guys were having a blast, awesome!
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:30 AM   #83
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Awesome!
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Old 11-06-2013, 08:00 PM   #84
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Wow, just wow.



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Old 11-06-2013, 09:13 PM   #85
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Dude, enjoyin' the hell outta this ride report!

It's funny... At the beginning, all I could think was "wow he's stoked on a $3.29 beer... I can't wait until he gets to Mexico/Central America!"

Cheers!!
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:35 AM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagespeed View Post
great video! really cool to see video of the places you've written about and posted stills. looks like you guys were having a blast, awesome!
Thanks Vintagespeed, I think it's a fun video, tip of the hat to Jose (jocejas) for putting it together.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KiLO View Post
Dude, enjoyin' the hell outta this ride report!

It's funny... At the beginning, all I could think was "wow he's stoked on a $3.29 beer... I can't wait until he gets to Mexico/Central America!"

Cheers!!
If I had only known that the land of cheep beer, good food, fun riding, and beautiful women was so close, I wouldn't have taken this long to get here. Looking at a map I'm under the impression that there's much more of all these things as well.

All I have to do is just keep riding south, correct? Sweet, that sounds easy enough.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:07 AM   #87
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24. Chilling In Tlalpan, DF

Back in the endless city of DF, Jose has been kind enough to put me in touch with one of his friends, Dante. Dante just so happens to have a spare room in his apartment and said I could flip him a few bucks and crash as long as I want. This would be cheaper than a hostel and I would get my own room? Deal. Dante lives in an area of DF called Tlalpan.



The apartment complex that he lives in is in all senses of the word, massive. There are 32 separate towers, each tower has two main columns of apartments. As you enter and progress through the area there are two separate security checkpoints and countless foot security patrolling the area, clicking in and out on their walkie-talkies. There are a lot of students and working class families that live in the towers. The place seems like a nicer place for people to live. Although it may be a little bougie for my tastes personally, the location is good, and I don’t have to worry about my bike being out on the streets at night, getting caught up in peoples tomfoolery. As a bonus, Dante is also a climber, and being in Tlalpan we are situated just about 20 minutes from some pretty damn good outdoor climbing. More on that later though.

Here’s the joint.





Insurgentes is one of the main streets that splits DF in two, from the north to the south. Tlalpan is located south of the centro area and is nestled right in at the southern tail of Insurgentes. It’s a relaxed area with a lived in feel to it. Sort of like the burbs, but with a bit more laid back cool and less highbrow. The area is a place for people to live that don’t want the mayhem and hecticness of the center of DF. It’s a place that university students and working class families live in and commute elsewhere for school and work. This demographic leads to a lot of people fluxing in and out throughout the day, and a busy bus system.



Here is the tail end of the vehicular river that is Insurgentes. Jump on this and soon it becomes several lanes wide in both directions and in 20 minutes you can be in the center of DF. IF you are on a motorcycle of course. Try to commute it in a car expecting 20 minutes and you’re gonna have a bad time. With so many people in DF there is alllllways traffic, having a bike allows you to split lanes, maneuver around the plethora of smog belching buses, and ride the occasional sidewalk to get through it all. Although I don’t do anything the locals aren’t doing, having a big bike and a foreign license plate is similar to painting a bullseye on your back in terms of police attention. A couple hundred pesos slipped into the passport usually gets you out of any infraction. Nobody wants to do paperwork, and everyone gets to get on with their day.



The community of Tlalpan revolves around the “Centro Historico” area. This is the perk of living here, as it’s laid back and full of cafe’s, small restaurants, and little bars.





In the center of the neighborhood, as with many places in Mexico, there is a main square and usually some sort of garden.







No town hall is complete without some entrenched protesters either.



There’s some cool street art to be found if you take the time to look.







This time of year (end of Oct. early Nov.) is important in Mexico because of Dia De Muertos (Day Of The Dead). It’s similar to Halloween but it’s history is rooted in indigenous culture and Aztec festivals. It does encapsulate Halloween though and is typically celebrated from Oct. 31 - Nov. 2nd. Explosions from fireworks lit from rooftops and sidewalks can be heard starting in the early morning and trickle on throughout the three days.





I’m not sure how much I’ve mentioned this, but I like to eat. In fact, I like to eat quite a bit. I would maybe even go so far as to say that I pick places to travel to partly based on the food that is available. Luckily, good food is easy to come by in Mexico. For example, my homeboy Ruben here slangs tacos at this stand all day long. 5 tacos of any kind for 25 pesos (less than $2) is the deal. Sometimes I come twice a day for snacks.



There’s also a nice sized indoor market if you are wanting a bit more variety. Pretty much anything can be found in these central food-hubs, every now and then mangos that are the size of your face.



On a good day I can identify 10% of the stuff sold, I’ll give most anything a try once though.



Sometimes I do want something more familiar. Something a little closer to home. I’m a fan of fruits, luckily baking with apples is a culturally universal thing in the Americas. Familiar treats such as this can be found at certain locations (~$1.50).



Eventually I do get bored though and blast into Mexico City centro to shoot the shit with Jose and Dano. Here we can go out and grab a bite somewhere else, for example maybe some rotten fruit that’s repurposed and baked into a delicious dessert.



This little morsel with sugar?/milk?/cream? drizzled on it, is similar to your grandmas baked bananas. Yes it looks worse than g-ma’s, but I believe it tastes even better.



After all the mud in Hidalgo, we needed to get the bikes cleaned and give mother earth her dirt back.



After cleaning the bikes, Jose showed me a neighborhood spot for some authentic Yucatan cuisine. It’s a good sign when you see lots of people outside patiently waiting to fill their face with whatever happens to be on the menu.



For us the menu included beer with a bunch of salt, spices, and salsa. Feeling hung over? Drink this and then go run a marathon.



We had some sort of sandwiches as well. This one had octopus in it I believe.



I sampled a number of things here to try and get a variety of flaves. Now let’s be clear. I have never had Yucatan cuisine, and this place is on the fancier end of the continuum and thus possibly not completely indicative of what people eat on the regular. But lean a bit closer and let me tell you something. IT’S FUCKING DELICIOUS. Whatever they have going on over in that peninsula, I want more of it. If this is an indication of the food I’m going to find when I head that way, ohhhh buddy help me now. If my belly wasn’t so full after eating this, I would have jumped on the bike right then and blasted out to the Yucatan, smothering my body in all of the food I could find along the way.

Soon enough though, soon enough. Right now, it’s time to work off all that grub and get out to do some climbing.



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Old 11-07-2013, 10:27 AM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeanPNW View Post
All I have to do is just keep riding south, correct? Sweet, that sounds easy enough.
Hahah you got it! Panama is amazing!!!
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Old 11-07-2013, 12:37 PM   #89
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You are doing it right!

I normally don't join in the group back slapping that goes on around here, but I just wanted to say that you are traveling through Mexico on your stomach, and that is the right way to do it! Well done, sir!

I have eaten in a lot of countries, and in my opinion the food and food culture in Mexico is as rooted in history, nuanced, complex and delicious as anywhere, and frankly more so than most.

I spent a few years living in Central Mexico (Mexico, Hidalgo, Queretaro, Guanajuato and Oaxaca). Most tourists totally miss out on the best parts of Mexico by skipping straight to the beaches and resorts. I especially like that you are taking the time to make friends, which is another thing that your casual vacationer misses out on: people who are genuinely friendly and hospitable and are not paid to be that way. Keep up the great work on this report! Que le via muy bien! Andale!
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Old 11-07-2013, 02:07 PM   #90
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thanks for the refreshing ride report

I needed this as the life-sucking weather has returned to the PNW
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