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Old 11-07-2013, 08:51 PM   #1
Brian011952 OP
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A Loop through California, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon.

Well, this past August my riding buddy and I left from my driveway on our two dual sport bikes. Mine is a Husaberg FE570S and his is a KTM 525. Our goal was to ride the Tour of Idaho (T-1) trail.

We considered how to accomplish getting the bikes to the trail and then getting picked up again at the other eend of the trail, and the only logical thing we could come up with was to just ride it all.

I sat for approximately a week with my map program and GPS in hand and looked for routes to get to and from the trail. The only real criteria was that asphalt in any form was to be avoided if at all possible. the priority was to ride USFS, BLM, and and trails we could find in between.

After deciding on a route, I attempted to download the route to my GPS. Here was the first real obstacle, the data port on my Garmin GPS broke loose from the circuit board disabling any transfer of data. A quick call to Garmin and I discovered they had quit supporting my GPS the previous year. Uh-oh! Ebay to the rescue, I was able to locate parts from a source in Russia (seriously). I immediatly ordered the data port and then received a notice that it wouldn't arrive until after we were scheduled to leave. Crap, drat, and other things were said, then back to Ebay. I located a used model of my GPS at a reasonable price and purchased it to replace my now broken unit. I thought about upgrading, but motorcycle mount and all my software and map programs work perfectly with my old unit, so I just bought another one. Then, go figure, a couple days before our departure date the Russian parts show up and I was able to fix my original GPS. I thought this was ok because now I had a spare in case I somehow smashed the new unit.

Our gear was discussed and what to carry per bike. Weight was a huge consideration as we knew the T-1 trail would have some challenges. We split up essentials as best we could and then decided on a date. We found two weeks in August that fit both of our schedules. As the date to leave approached, we discussed our maximum range with our fuel, how we were each going to pack our bikes, and what clothing to wear and bring with us. With weight being our primary concern, these discussions were quite important. Knowing that we would be in the back country for most of the trip, we decided upon certain essential items. I could share our list if anyone would like to see that, but for now lets just say we still didn't quite pare it down enough and I wish we had left more gear at home. That said, if we had, I'm sure we would have needed exactly what we left behind.

The week before we leave, we are both doing last minute maintenance and mechanical checks on our bikes, and we both find issues. My buddy finds a problem with his lights, and hurriedly robs a replaceement lighting set up from his Husquvarna and attaches it to the KTM. his problem is solved easily. Me, I notice a slight clunking sound coming from the rear of my bike. I place it on the stand and find a tiny bit of free play in what feels like the rear wheel, no problem. I dismount the wheel and install a new set of bearings and seals. As I check the old bearings, I notice dirty grease in one bearing, but no play in either of them? I reassemble, and the free play is still there. Hmmm...., must be a swing arm bearing. That seems odd to me since my old KTM has over 35,000 miles on the odometer without a bearing issue and this Husaberg has less than 10,000 miles since new. I decide I must find the clunk. I remove the shock and rear swing arm. As I remove the swing arm, the drive side bearing falls out in rusty pieces. I'm not particularly bright, but I think that I have found the problem. I have less than a week and I'm hundreds of miles from the nearest parts source for a Husaberg. Crap, drat and dang are said again, then phone calls are made.

The dealer has a bearing kit, and it will take three days to mail it to me. I buy it and hold my breath until it arrives. The kit arrives with a day and a half to spare, I can breath again, and I'm very happy I didn't have that problem out on the trail.

With the bike fixed, I begin packing gear on to it and trying to load it for a long ride off road over rough terrain. I cover a couch with gear and realize that Packing is going to be a real challenge. I decide to just park the bike on the patio and try packing it. On my third or fourth attempt, I think I have it loaded as well as I can. The couch still has gear, but I've now deemed those item non-essential and they are headed back to the garage and the gear shelf. Loaded and with all my gear, I take a shake down cruise. I jump the bike, I wheelie it, I run some whoops and realize my light weight Hussaberg with all the power I love is now an overloaded heavy weight; well, not really a heavy weight, but much fatter and slower than she normally is. She's also suddenly got a soft suspension, and I'm very thankful I lost thirty five pounds this year. If I was still weighing her down with extra belly, she'd probably be horrible to ride, but as it is, I just have to watch hitting really harsh stuff hard because she'll bottom out, and I hate the sound of tires contacting the fenders.

For tonight, I think I'll stop here. I will contribute more tomorrow night. I hope you all like the start, the ride we end up taking is twelve days long and covers just over 3300 miles. I will break it down by each day and try to share this semi epic adventure that we had this summer.
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:48 PM   #2
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Sounds great!!!
Can you share a map of your travels?

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Old 11-07-2013, 10:50 PM   #3
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Great start

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Old 11-08-2013, 12:25 PM   #4
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Sounds like a great trip - a map would be great to see, or if you have the tracks that would be even better.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:46 PM   #5
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Update.

I'm horrible at uploading anything to this site, although I've tried many times. I have tons of photos, a full map, and I have the GPS routes. I also have a super clunky computer and limited High Speed internet access, so up loading mmaps or routes or pictures is almost impossible. I'll try again, but I don't forsee good results. Sorry.

The day of our departure finally arrives. My buddy came up early the night before our departure and stayed the night at my home. My wife cooked us a great dinner and we had a drink or two and talked through the details of the trip. We knew we had fourteen days to complete the entire trip, and we had an average of 250+ miles per day required. We had made two reservations for the entire trip.

Our first reservation and must make spot was at Salmon, Idaho. We had arranged with the Wildhorse motorcycle shop to have tires waiting and for the use of their shop for maintenance. This was near the mid-point of the trip, and we had a date with the shop, so to speak (there will be more on this later, but for now I'll just say the shop was great and really went above and beyond). Our next reservation was at a lodge along the Lochsa River in the Lolo Pass. I found a blog by two riders that showed the lodge and we decided it would make a great place to relax for an evening. That was our schedule in its entirety. The only other plan we had was to camp in the back country for two days and then try and get a place where was a hot shower available on the third day.

Departure morning and we departed at first light. On this first day, we were headed into country that was fairly familiar for the first two hundred miles. We discussed our route and didn't rely on the GPS until the early afternoon. We left my driveway in Alturas, Ca. wearing our heavy riding jackets and headed east over Cedar Pass at 6000'. It was a bit chilly even in August and the heavy jackets were a must this first morning. We imagined the heavy riding coats would be a must in the higher elevations of Idaho. Both my buddy and I have experienced Idaho in the summer, and we are quite aware of the afternoon rain showers. The funny thing is, we wore our heavy jackets this first morning and never again. They were packed away and remained there for the next eleven days. This was one of those equipment areas we couldn't skimp on, but if we had only known.

At Cedarville we both had enough fuel for another 80+ miles where we knew we would find fuel on a ranch. Being in Northern Nevada and skirting along the north edge of the Black Rock Desert, fuel is precious. Knowing ranchers and where fuel is located is an essential in this area. Soldier Meadows is a nice ranch house that has guest quarters. The Soldier Meadows ranch has a very long history dating back to Fort Mcgarry (sp?). Fort Mcgarry was the largest calvary fort west of the Missisippi until the 1870's. It was vital in protecting the travelers along the route to Idaho. The Soldier Meadows ranch house sits on the site of the calvary stables. there are still remaining Officer's quarters, a barn, and a couple of enlisted lodgings. It is one of my favorite places to visit, and they have FUEL!

From Soldier Meadows, we rode due east over the mountians and out onto the Black Rock playa near the location where the pioneer Peter Lassen was murdered. As we entered the playa, we turned north towards the Leonard Creek ranch and road by the same name. By this time, the day had warmed and the riding weather was absolutely perfect. We crossed the Quinn River (this river was refered to in the old west as the Queen's River), and we entered Nevada 140 Our first piece of asphalt since leaving Cedarville. We rode the pavement from here to Paradise Valley. At Paradise Valley, we fueled everything we were able to carry. Our next leg was pressing our fuel capabilities to their limits.

In preparation for this trip, I built a tank for my Husaberg that I've detailed on here in another post. This placed my fuel capacity at 5.3 gallons on board. If ridden carefully, I can count on 50 MPG leaving me with approximately 250 miles of range. My buddy had added a similar tank and was able to carry a little over 6 gallons. His bike gets slightly better mileage than mine in most situations, but on this trip this role reversed. Once leaving California and finding fuel that was not as high in Ethanol and in Idaho with zero Ethanol, my mileage increased to a maximum of 62 MPG. The KTM with a carburetor didn't see the same gains with the loss of Ethanol.

From Paradise Valley, to our next fuel stop, we had 274 miles to travel in remote back country areas. So, to make up for our lack of fuel tank capacity, we improvised. 2 liter cola bottles are the time honored tradition of dirt bikers, at least the ones I have ridden with. So, with an extra four liters of fuel on board each, we left Paradise Valley and headed out into the Qwyhee Desert. Entering the Owyhee, the road which I had selected from the comfort of my couch began as gravel, changed to a two track, and finally turned into two tracks side by side that were being used by cows more than vehicles. It is exactly the type of road I'd hoped to find there.

The Owyhee, were we rode through, became quite flat. Eventually, we could just make out the mountains surrounding it as dim shapes in the distance. The grasses, shrubs, and sage were interspersed with lava rocks and cows. In Northern Nevada, cows are always there. If there is ever an apocalypse, the cow will be my most likely to survive animal based solely on its sheer numbers and how it survives in the wastelands of America's out back. The Owyhee is beautiful. It's a very beautiful and lonesome place. I enjoyed it immensly. It literally seemed like we were riding across some portion of maybe Mongolia with the lack of civilization, but insteadd of taking days to cross, the Owyhee takes a few short hours to cross. Of note, it would be a really bad place to break down and need someone to rescue you with a pickup. So, why did I have to get my first flat of the trip. The first day and the first flat, either it was a bad sign or I was getting the inevitable out of the way early.

The flat was easily fixed, a puncture caused by a nail, but there was one hang up. I had decided to run a Mefo Super Explorer rear tire in hopes of making this entire trip without a tire change. The Mefo is a hard tire and fairly stiff. When I remounted the tire using several Co2 cartridges, the bead refused to seat completely on one side. I figured with a little riding and heat, it would loosen and seat. Funny thing, 3000 miles later that tire was still not seated, but it had made the whole trip.

More tomorrow.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:59 PM   #6
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.....are you hosting your pics first to something like photobucket? ..... A report on a trip such as this really needs pics.
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:06 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by obrianmcc View Post
.....are you hosting your pics first to something like photobucket? ..... A report on a trip such as this really needs pics.
I wish, I've tried. None of them upload with my old clunky computer. I'll try again, maybe get my wife to help me. Sometimes that will do the trick.
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Old 11-09-2013, 05:27 PM   #8
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Sounds great, hope you can post some pics!
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Old 11-09-2013, 08:14 PM   #9
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With the tire fixed, we again headed east. We hit asphalt at Nevada 225 where we turned south towards Wildhorse reservoir. There were rumors of gasoline at Wildhorse reservoir, but I had not been able to confirm them during my pre-trip planning. I knew there was Fuel further east at Jarbridge, Nv, but that required almost a forty mile detour from our planned route. Southbound on 225 to Wildhorse was beautiful as we entered a canyon between two sizeable bluffs with the highway following Machado Creek. I would have liked to stop and camp right there with a good fresh water creek to camp beside, but we needed to press onward.

We knew there would be days with low mileage ahead and we wanted to build a comfortable cushion while we were still in familiar territory. As we exited the canyon, we came into sight of Wildhorse reservoir. Knowing there might be fuel at this location and that Wildhorse reservoir is a sportsman/fisherman's destination, I turned off into the first camp ground planning to inquire with a camper if there was in fact fuel available nearby.

The first camper I spotted was an elderly man wearing a cast on his leg and hobbling along on a pair of crutches. Since he was slowed by his injury, he couldn't outrun us before we could pull up and engage him in conversation. I explained that we were looking for fuel and wondered if there was a place to buy fuel around Wildhorse. He informed me that there was no public fuel station, but he knew where we could get a small amount of fuel. He hobbled down two campsites to a neighbor and inquired if he'd like to sell us some fuel? I figured if someone wanted to spare a couple of gallons of fuel and sell it to me I was willing to play a short game of follow the man on crutches.

As it turned out, the camper two sites down was the camp host and he had some extra generator fuel he didn't mind selling. All of this reminded me of a previous trip when we were in a remote area of Baja canvassing the local watering hole for fuel and finally having a guy agree to sell us the fuel out of his pickup; which he siphoned personally for us. Anyway, we wern't in Baja, but we were getting an extra gallon of fuel apiece and some piece of mind about making this long leg. As it turned out, without the gallon we bought here, we'd have made it to our next fuel stop with approximately one quart of reserve fuel. That would have been a little tight for my comfort level.

After buying our fuel, we left Wildhorse on 225 south for another few miles and then exited the asphalt again heading towards the Jarbridge Mountains and the Charleston Deeth road. We wanted to reach the Marys river before dark and it was getting towards late afternoon. As we entered the south edge of the Jarbridge mountains, the scenery and elevation began to change. We were leaving the sage and lava desert for a higher grasslands with Aspen trees and small streams. It was absolutely gorgeous scenery and required stops for pictures and just to look at some beautiful views. Evidently, it is also home to Elk and this was hunting season, so most the good camp sites were occupied.

We kept riding for the Marys river. Just before dark we descended a narrow canyon and dropped onto the Marys river. The Marys river is a small stream in actuality, but there was good grass meadow and some trees to camp in beside the river. We had the place to ourselves, and that night we slept in our tents listening to coyotes howl in the surrounding hills for most of the night. Our first day we had covered 411 Miles.
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Old 11-10-2013, 09:19 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian011952 View Post
I wish, I've tried. None of them upload with my old clunky computer. I'll try again, maybe get my wife to help me. Sometimes that will do the trick.
Are your files too large..... You might need to resize. Once you have the pics downloaded it's a simple copy paste procedure of the IMG tags at that point.

You have a really good narrative going ..... Would be cool if you could get some pics inserted.
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Old 11-10-2013, 08:01 PM   #11
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We awoke to our tents covered in frost and with the morning quite cool. As the sun creeped over the horizon, I fixed my coffee and breakfast using my MSR stove. I love this stove. It is a multi fuel stove tthat will burn gasoline. To me that serves two purposes, I can carry a fuel cannister empty to save weight or full for extra fuel. If I carry it empty, I just siphon some from the bike at the end of the day, and if I carry it full, I can always drain it into the tank if fuel gets that scarce (I've done this before). Since the bike is my fuel reservoir, there is no need to carry a bunch of propane canisters and this stove is quite compact too. I've got over ten years of use out of the stove with no issues at all. The other nice part with the stove is that I've climbed Mt. Shasta twice and at above 10,000 feet altitude this stove boils water in a very short time.

Back to breakfast, we had decided to carry only one day worth of food apiece since we were routed through some sort of civilization each day. I just couldn't do this. I'm a weanie when it comes to food and water and I always operate on the never enough theory (it's same with fuel). I paired it down as best as I could, but I still carried enough for several days of emergency rations. I have however learned what light weight foods keep me going so this is not a real issue. My breakfast is usually two packets of Quaker instant oatmeal, and two cups of Folgers coffee. I carry beef Jerky for snacks in an easy to reach spot, and there is never a lunch packed. Lunch is a couple of energy bars. Dinner is usually some type of meat product (fried Spam) and Idahoan instant mashed potatoes. With the simple addition of water, all this gourmet cooking happens within minutes of setting up camp. I also carry a couple of full back packing meals like Chilli and some sort of pasta and three cheese meal. I can't stand the beef preservatives, so I stay with cheese sauses and the red sauces. That's about it for food supplies, well I usually throw in one can of Sardines somewhere and maybe some foil tuna packs for quick energy.

As to the water situation, I carry a MSR water filtration pump. It works great, and on this morning, I filtered all of our water bags full out of the Marys river before we left, and thank God we are always filling our water at every chance we can get. On this second day, that became a real comfort and could have been a literal life saver had we not been able to get things band-aided together in the middle of the day.

We waited for the sun to creep up and dry the frost off of our tents, ate, filled our hydration packs, packed the bikes and were back on the trail with a good early start to our day. Our goal was to reach the begining of the T-1 trail at the south end of the Caribou Mountians and northeast of the Great Salt Lake.

It's hard to describe exactly what it's like to navigate with a GPS from a bar mount over country you have never even seen before. I know many of you do this in your local areas or follow along as someone else guides you by GPS, but being the leader is diferent. I am always balancing fuel against a wrong turn. Occasionally, the road I've selected no longer exists or is on private property and I have to re-route on the spot. For this reason, I print out a series of black and white topo maps of each days ride and place these maps in a binder. Each day before I begin the day, I take out that days maps and put them in my tank bag so I can use them for reference (they make great fire starter in the evening). the GPS is good, but the screen never shows enough area to make good course corrections, so I often will stop and check the maps when it seems my GPS route may be closed off or impassable. It's my system and it has taken me through literally almost 50,000 miles of back country without a glitch. I also carry a compass, when all else fails, I can resort to that if necesary.

We leave our camp and use secondary roads to reach the O'neil Basin road which we follow south to Nevada 93 (asphalt) then south to the Wilkins Montello road which is gravel. We stay on this road all the way to Nevada 30 and the town of Montello. This whole route is a ride across cow country. there is no place like the west for cows, at least no place that I know of, and the American Cowboy is alive and well out here. We pass a few remote line camps, but mostly just cows, sage, dusty two tracks, and endless views. I so love these areas and riding out west. I can't imagine what i would do without these open spaces. As we turn on to the Montello road, we are surrounded by BLM and a very large private cattle ranch. For miles, we follow the cattle ranch fence on the south side of the road and BLM signs on the north side of the road. The country is amazing, we are on hard gravel now and we pass not a single soul for literally seventy miles or more.

It is my type of country. I love lonely country and having a motorcycle to go through it on. I imagine myself in the old west sometimes and think what it must have been like to do this by horse and wagon. Funny, I never imagine myself with a wagon, it's always me and just my horse. Maybe I'd have been a trapper back then operating far from home amid the wild parts and the wild people, I don't know, but something out in these lands calls to me deep in my bones. As I write this, I seriously get the urge to be back there now. I can't explain it.

We arrive at Montello and the fuel station is closed. I had specifically called ahead to assure they would have fuel and be open, bu there is a funeral. Montello, as you turn onto its main street (Nevada 30), is a serious one horse town. Dusty, windy, and with a tumbleweed rolling across the highway. There is one general store and a bar/restaurant. We are sytymied with no fuel and decide it's close enough to lunch to see if the restaurant is open. It is, and we are the only customers in a room that has seen its prime at least 40 years ago; if not 60. There are three slot machines, a bar, and a pool table with a kitchen buried behind all that and some swinging doors. The bartender is also the waitress, so when she's cooking, drinks are on hold. My advice is have a full drink before you order.

As we order, we learn that there is funeral and that the store with the fuel pumps will open back up in an hour after the owner returns from the funeral. We relax and order lunch. We are able to place quick calls home and inform our spouses that so far no heinous calamity has befallen us. Mine actually already knew this because of messages I'm able to send through my SPOT beacon. If you don't pack a SPOT and ride on adventures like I do, you really need to get one. Our lunch arrives and is quite tasty despite the bow in the roof above the bar that looks like a serious leak if it ever rains here. As we finish lunch, people begin to trickle in from the funeral and we know the store will be opening soon. We end up staying long enough to see that Elmore Leonard would have a ball writing about the charachters in this town. I love America and the hardiness in the west that I see. That tough breed with a self reliance that says I'll still be here after you are long gone stranger. It just makes me proud of these hardy souls who live in one horse towns in the middle of deserts.

With both the bikes and us fueled and properly watered, we top off our hydration packs and head onto Nevada 30. The temps are reaching into the 100 degree range and it's warm but not uncomfortable riding. It's just on the verge of too hot, but as long as you keep the wind moving and don't over exert yourself it feels about right. We ride north and east with no fuel again in our future until Golden Spike, Utah.

I've mapped a route across the north edge of the great salt lake and through an area surprisingly devoid of any civilization. It's my type of place, but soon it becomes a real challenge too. I've choosen to ride a route shown on my map as an old railroad grade that runs almost due east across this country for over seventy miles, then through a mountain range, and into rolling farm land before it crosses a major highway and enters Golden Spike. I guess the whole Golden Spike and old railroad grade might have been a clue, but little did I know that we were about to ride the original first Trans Continental Railroad grade. I was so glad we didn't miss this one section of history. It plays right into my old west mindset. It was a good pull across completely uninhabited country, not even cows, but for us the distance isn't diffficult; unless, we have mechanical issues, and we do.

Tomorrow More.
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Old 11-16-2013, 04:18 PM   #12
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I'm not finished, I've just gotten a good start. I had to go out of town for the week, but I should be able to add some tonight.
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Old 11-16-2013, 05:48 PM   #13
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I am in.
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Old 11-16-2013, 06:29 PM   #14
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We need pichurs
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Old 11-16-2013, 07:07 PM   #15
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This sounds interesting.We just need photos!
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